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D-Fly adds wireless data transmission to new PRO cycling computer

Shimano has launched D-Fly for its Di2 electronic groupsets, enabling you to track gear selection and battery life through a handlebar-mounted cycling computer.

The D-Fly Data Management system, to give it its full name, is compatible with Dura-Ace 9070, Ultegra 6870 Di2 and Ultegra 6770 E-tube groupsets. It simply plugs into the E-tube wiring and is powered by the main Di2 battery. The wireless unit weighs just 5g and is small, measuring just 38mm long, 25mm wide and 12.5mm high.

It uses a proprietary private ANT wireless protocol to communicate data to the new PRO Scio ANT+ cycling computer, a new addition to the Pro 2014 catalogue. Shimano says the computer lets you monitor gear position and battery life from the Di2 groupset, as well as the other typical functions most cycling computers provide. It adds that future compatibility with Mio and other computers is planned for the spring.

The SM-EWW01 Wireless unit, that its official name, costs £69.99. The PRO Scio computer costs £99.99, is available in white or black, and should be in shops now.

There’s no sense of the full capability this wireless system might be able to provide, could it for example suggest gear changes based on cadence?  Could it be used to tailor the function of the shift buttons, as you can by plugging the groupset into a computer.

There’s also no indication from Shimano if there’ll be compatibility with other ANT+ cycling computers, such as the popular Garmin Edge series. We also imagine Shimano will package this wireless transmitter more cleanly in a future update of its Di2 groupset, perhaps concealing it inside the shifter body.

It’s an interesting move from Shimano, but we suspect there might be more scope for this technology in the future.

David has worked on the road.cc tech team since July 2012. Previously he was editor of Bikemagic.com and before that staff writer at RCUK. He's a seasoned cyclist of all disciplines, from road to mountain biking, touring to cyclo-cross, he only wishes he had time to ride them all. He's mildly competitive, though he'll never admit it, and is a frequent road racer but is too lazy to do really well. He currently resides in the Cotswolds.