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Hi all,

Just got a lovely pair of S-works road shoes for my birthday, and I'm deliberating over what pedals I should use to get the most out of them. Managed to narrow it down to the Dura-Ace SPD-SL 9000 pedals which I can get for £130 or so, and the Speedplay Zeros in Chromeoly which are around £110.
The extra float of the Speedplays is really appealing since I used to have a few joint issues, but I haven't actually had any knee issues for quite a while now so I'm wondering if I really need them in that respect. The double sided entry is always handy too, and I'm anticipating it will be particularly helpful at traffic lights where I already have a bit of tendency to get in a flap clipping into my commuting SPDs!!
I'm really stepping up my training at the moment and looking to make up lost ground over the Easter holidays, so I guess what I'm looking for is a pedal that will keep up with the beating my bike and I will take on the road this spring!
Does anyone have any suggestions or anecdotes about using these pedals?

12 comments

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spin sugar [48 posts] 2 years ago
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I have recently started using Speedplay Zeros on my "best" bike and am a total convert. I love the range of float. I found I adjusted to them quite quickly and now I find I have increased comfort on the bike. Factors to consider: that there is adjustment time. I would perhaps bea bit reluctant to instal them on a commuter bike (if that would be your intention) if it takes a hammering as they do require regular maintenance/greasing and the cleats, I find, are slightly more susceptible to damage. If you do go for Speedplays, I recommend buying the coffee shop covers for when you're off the bike and also asking someone to update your bike fit to help you get the positioning spot on as it's different compared to SPDs - you may also need to adjust saddle height a fraction as the stack height is different.

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Yorkshie Whippet [530 posts] 2 years ago
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I've used X-series for over ten year and Zeroes for a couple of years after going through various spd style. If you want more float and less adjustment seriously look at X-series. I find the spring on the X-series is easier than the Zeroes. Or even look at the Light range. Look on ebay as for around £130 you can upgrade to better bearings and stainless axle.

Bad points, the cleats are expensive and I change mine every year. The instructions say every 3500km. They take quite a while to set up correctly. X-2s have a needle bearing that's near impossible to remove.

Good points, knee saving, double entry. You can walk on them without worrying about the cleat itself, just don't fill it with mud. There are places on ebay that sell plastic covers that you walk on and don't need to remove (much reccommended). Apart from pumping grease into the pedal evey now and then, they seem to be bombproof.

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n8udd [42 posts] 2 years ago
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Reading your post above, is there any reason *not* to buy the speedplays? They seem to match your criteria, with the added bonus of being cheaper than the DA pedals.

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TripperMint [7 posts] 2 years ago
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Thanks for the advice, guys.
Not looking to use them on a commuter bike, it will be for my race bike. Looking to get a good time in the London-Surrey 100 this summer!
I've heard from a few people that they've clipped out of speedplays on occasion when they're really putting down the watts in sprints or on the track because the angle required to clip out is directly proportional to the amount of float you have. But, since I'm neither a sprinter nor in possession of a pair of legs that could grind out even a 1/4 of the power of Cav, I don't suppose it really matters  1
What I'm looking for is a really secure, tight platform, since the wiggle I get in my current SPDs is really irritating me.

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therevokid [948 posts] 2 years ago
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Speedplays - good enough for Spartacus, good enough for me  1

The light action ones I can just about pull my foot out, but the Zeros ... not
a chance. I now have light action pedals on the GF-Ti with zero cleats and
this works a treat. Yes you do need to lube them, especially if you're riding
in a lot of wet/rain etc and having the float fully open makes for an odd
sensation first time out of the saddle - feels like the cleat has come loose !!
cleats are expensive which is another reason for coffee shop covers but I've
not worn a cleat out yet and one pair is over 2 years old - just make sure you
have the post coffee mantra of "covers covers covers" as 1/2 a mile of not
being able to clip in then realise why is a touch embarrassing  1

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Farky [183 posts] 2 years ago
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I tried Speedplays cuz theyre 'Pro'......tart

Best decision ever - so much more feeling of power transition through the full pedal stroke and so much easier to use - double sided, take abuse.

I dont get people saying they need maintenance - I bought Stainless ones - I just squirt spray stuff in the shoe cleats every now and then and replaced the show cleats after 12 months just as its a routine.
The outter side fo the cleats are a soft metal and do damage easily when walking but they have NO effect on use as its the innerside that is in contact with the pedal, just dont get them filled with mud as mentioned.

Pedal stack height is lower - im not good enough to benefit from the aerodynamics of this.

They are more fiddly to fit to the shoe and you do need to use loctite to secure the screws...I did that with spds anyway as im not daft and I never found spds non-fiddly to start with either. You get used to it - its just different.

Why would you buy plastic, easy to brake, annually replaced cleats that are less comfortable for the average rider is the question.

A decent bike fit/show fit, will reduce the comfort issues one type has over the other though.

I like em cuz theyre double sided and way better than mtb-spd.  21

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Nick T [913 posts] 2 years ago
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If it's a race bike then it really doesn't matter what you use regarding the clip action, once you're in you're in do double sided clips are pretty meaningless. Float is something to consider, but unless you think you need more then it's best not to try more - too much movement can create as many problems as it solves. Personally I like the same pedals for all my bikes instead of mixing them up, it means all my shoes are interchangeable and I'm well versed in how they work - for me that means Speedplays are out of the question, I don't want to get mud and grit in the cleats from a commute and have to stop to clean them all the time. Also the only time I've ever seen anyone unintentionally unclip was a club mate who rides Speedplays, sort of put me off after watching it happen for the third time in a morning.

So the right answer for me is Keo Blades.

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cs6xuk [5 posts] 2 years ago
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I recently got a new carbon bike and too new shoes which meant I had to choose pedals too, I for the last few years have used look keo but this time I wanted something better I have been using my speedplay zero about 4 times, about 120 miles, they are great pedals they do take time to set up (30 mins or so) so I put my bike on the turbo so I could sit clip in adjust the cleats, once adjustment were made I have had no trouble with them, what i will say is with float it took me the first ride to sort out, (i personally prefer 0-3 degree of float) I would go with the speedplay pedals I dont think your be disappointed.
While riding the pedalling feels really secure firm in and out the saddle when clipped in .
Clipping in is stiff at first and once you get the knack its second nature.
The pedals feel bigger then they look when pressing through the pedal if that makes sense.
Hope this helps

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bikerdavecycling [73 posts] 2 years ago
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Been riding Speedplay X (and Speedplay Frog off road) for over 10 years. Ease of clipping in and out excellent (as long as cleats aren't worn out), love the float, they're light, I've never accidently clipped out. Not a lot else I can add....

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herlihy [9 posts] 2 years ago
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I had these for a while. Didn't find any real difference between using these and normal ( Look or Shimano) pedals. What was a problem was the faff of having them;the lubrication, the glue, the shoe covers. Too much effort for marginal gains. You can find Look or Shimano cleats to give you reasonable float

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ajmarshal1 [411 posts] 2 years ago
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I've also seen speedplay users unclip unintentionally. Not just once either. Just going to throw another hat into the ring here: Time ICLIC 2 or Xpresso. I have them on all my bikes and love them. They're hardy, easy, positive engagement and contrary to belief the cleats last plenty long enough. (Nearly 3000 miles on my current set, they're now due a change, £12 boo-hoo). Never accidentally clipped out and nearly stacked my bike on a sprint or climb with them either.

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Yorkshie Whippet [530 posts] 2 years ago
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How do you unitentionally unclip speedplays? I've used them for over 10 yrs and can not remember doing it once. It is impossible to pull up out of them unless they have not been fully engaged, which it a feat in itself. The only other way I can see is that people are swinging their heals around, in which case wouldn't any pedel unclip?