UCI "shocked" and "indignant" about Tyler Hamilton's "unfounded" 60 Minutes allegations

All guns blazing response from the blazer of Aigle

by Tony Farrelly   May 23, 2011  

UCI logo on white

In a strongly worded press release issued this afternoon the UCi has strongly rejected the claims made by Tyler Hamilton on the CBS 60 Minutes programme that a representative of cycling's world governing body intervened to suppress a laboratory report on a positive test for EPO by Lance Armstrong at the 2001 Tour de Suisse.

In the statement (reproduced in full below) the UCI pronounces itself "deeply shocked by the seriousness of the allegations" slightly more surprisingly the statement then adds "…and by the extent of the media interest in the case", maybe Aigle is a more exciting spot than previously credited.

The UCI then goes on to re-state the organisation's postion on the allegations surrounding a failed test by Armstrong at the 2001 Tour de Suisse – it didn't happen. Lance Armstrong "has never been notified of a positive test result by any anti-doping laboratory" although some may point out that although Armstrong may not have been informed others could have been.

However the statement goes further seeming to cast doubt on the ability of the testing regime in 2001 to detect EPO: "…the UCI also wishes to point out that in doping cases it must abide by the rules of evidence; any statutory or scientific evaluation must necessarily be made on the basis of the rules, knowledge and detection methods available at the time. In fact blood and urine testing for EPO was in place for the 2000 Olympics and by 2003 WADA felt confident enough in the urine test to allow its use  as a stand alone test for EPO. Under WADA rules a verifed test can be used retrospectively on samples that are up to 8 years old – which would seem to rule out re-testing any samples from 2001.

As with Landis the UCI is scathing of Hamilton and his credibility as a witness denouncing him as "a cyclist who has not hesitated to abuse the trust of all followers of cycling on several occasions in the past. At no time did he see fit to inform the UCI of the events he claims to have witnessed ten years ago, and which he is now using in his attempt to harm the UCI."

Like Floyd Landis Tyler Hamilton can also cross Switzerland of any future travel plans unless he's bringing a lawyer:

"The UCI will continue to defend its honour and credibility by all means available, and reserves the right to take any measures it deems necessary against Mr Hamilton or any other person."

However, unless the UCI is willing to take action in the US courts such threats will probably be viewed as posturing by both Hamilton, Landis and any lawyers of their acquaintance.

While the UCI "confidently awaits the results of the inquiry being conducted by the US justice system" the amount of evidence piling up for the counter argument suggests the possibility that the UCI's "confidence" may prove to be misplaced and that Hamilton, and by extension Landis, may be vindicated by the grand jury investigation. If this statement is anything to go by that is too bleak a prospect for those in charge at cycling's world governing body to engage with yet, at least in public.

UCI press statement

UCI rejects allegations made by Tyler Hamilton

The International Cycling Union categorically rejects the allegations made by Mr Tyler Hamilton, who claims that Lance Armstrong tested positive for EPO during the 2001 Tour of Switzerland and had the results covered up after one of his representatives approached the Lausanne laboratory responsible for analysing test results from the event.

The UCI is deeply shocked by the seriousness of the allegations made on the “60 Minutes” programme aired by US television network CBS, and by the extent of the media interest in the case, and wishes to state once again that it has never altered or hidden the results of a positive test.

The allegations of Mr Tyler Hamilton are completely unfounded. The UCI can only express its indignation at this latest attempt to damage the image of cycling by a cyclist who has not hesitated to abuse the trust of all followers of cycling on several occasions in the past. At no time did he see fit to inform the UCI of the events he claims to have witnessed ten years ago, and which he is now using in his attempt to harm the UCI.

The UCI can only confirm that Lance Armstrong has never been notified of a positive test result by any anti-doping laboratory.

Aside from the fact that no legal action may now be taken in respect of events that occurred in 2001, the UCI also wishes to point out that in doping cases it must abide by the rules of evidence; any statutory or scientific evaluation must necessarily be made on the basis of the rules, knowledge and detection methods available at the time.

Once again, the UCI wishes to state that no manipulation or cover-up has occurred in respect of its anti-doping procedures. The UCI will continue to defend its honour and credibility by all means available, and reserves the right to take any measures it deems necessary against Mr Hamilton or any other person.

The UCI confidently awaits the results of the inquiry being conducted by the US justice system. It hopes that the investigations may be concluded swiftly and the truth ascertained, so that the sport of cycling may be spared further unnecessary damage.
 

2 user comments

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One of the things I dislike about the UCI is their assumption that "the sport of cycling" and the UCI are one and the same thing.

two wheels good; four wheels bad

posted by cat1commuter [1358 posts]
23rd May 2011 - 20:16

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'the UCI this' 'the UCI that' 'the UCI states'!! has McQuaid been gagged?

antonio

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posted by antonio [964 posts]
23rd May 2011 - 20:31

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