Hello from a newbie.....and some advice needed please

by goldtop   July 9, 2013  

My first post, although I have been lurking here for a while now.

I've been commuting on my Cannondale Bad Boy for a couple of years now (fairweather only) around 8 miles down
railway walks and canal towpaths, but have recently started getting out on the back roads for 20/30 mile rides
and loving it. However, on these rides I do suffer from wrist/hand pain and numbness even stretching up my forearms to my elbows,
which is spoling the fun for me. Not much fun being continually past by much less fitter looking riders on their
shiny new road bikes either. I realise the alu frame and forks coupled with the flat bars don't help, so I'm thinking of getting a road bike.

I've been to my lbs who recommended a Giant Defy 3 as a good starter, but I'm worried about buying one only
to find I have the same problems. I've also been looking at buying an old steel frame bike just to try in the hope it will be a bit
kinder but still be more suited to roads than my Bad Boy. Maybe something like this....

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/mens-gents-raleigh-vintage-road-racing-bike-/4...

Any advice appreciated..and apologies for such a long winded first post!

15 user comments

Oldest firstNewest firstBest rated

Welcome.

The good thing about drop bars is that you can change hand position so that should help.

A good (well designed) alu frame doesn't have to beat you up.

posted by Super Domestique [1641 posts]
9th July 2013 - 13:27

8 Likes

Welcome along. This may be an obvious thing to say but do you have any gloves? Passed track mitts really do help to soak up the bumps and potholes, and are not to expensive. £30 will get you a pair that will last you for ages. ANd they'll stop you from grazing your palms to shreds should you ever come off the bike.

posted by Meaulnes [45 posts]
9th July 2013 - 21:13

1 Like

I bought a Bianchi Impulso just before Christmas. Its got an Aluminium Frame and carbon forks and its ace. Really comfy. Make no mistake though, cycling still hurts but you do get used to it. I couldn't type for a few days after my first long ride and my backside still aches even now. That's after Assos shorts, Gore Gloves, comfy shoes blah blah blah. But its worth it.

As for being passed, so what, try and keep up. I get dropped all the time - this evening by a chap on a single speed in the ruddy peak district. However I did Blaze Hill the other week in one go. The first time I tried I stopped 15 times and nearly had a heart attack.

Get the best bike you can afford and go for it - just get used to other cyclists not waving or recognizing you until its winter!

posted by dunnoh [176 posts]
9th July 2013 - 22:14

6 Likes

Meaulnes wrote:
Welcome along. This may be an obvious thing to say but do you have any gloves? Passed track mitts really do help to soak up the bumps and potholes, and are not to expensive. £30 will get you a pair that will last you for ages. ANd they'll stop you from grazing your palms to shreds should you ever come off the bike.

Thanks for the welcome.

Yes I always wear padded fingerless gloves for both these reasons. I've also tried various seat and bar positions, but has made no difference. Strangely I don't have this problem on my commute which is mostly railway walk/towpath.

I've got some spare time over the next few weeks, so I'm going to buy an old steel road bike and see how I fare with that.

posted by goldtop [12 posts]
9th July 2013 - 22:17

4 Likes

dunnoh wrote:
I bought a Bianchi Impulso just before Christmas. Its got an Aluminium Frame and carbon forks and its ace. Really comfy. Make no mistake though, cycling still hurts but you do get used to it. I couldn't type for a few days after my first long ride and my backside still aches even now. That's after Assos shorts, Gore Gloves, comfy shoes blah blah blah. But its worth it.

As for being passed, so what, try and keep up. I get dropped all the time - this evening by a chap on a single speed in the ruddy peak district. However I did Blaze Hill the other week in one go. The first time I tried I stopped 15 times and nearly had a heart attack.

Get the best bike you can afford and go for it - just get used to other cyclists not waving or recognizing you until its winter!

Must admit I've been lusting over Bianchis these last few weeks. They look fantastic Cool

I'm reasonably fit and in good shape for an old un, but I rode along chatting to an even older chap last week on his Trek roadie and I was struggling, while he was just breezing along. And most of the conversation was him pointing out all the reasons I should get a road bike

posted by goldtop [12 posts]
9th July 2013 - 22:42

3 Likes

My arms & wrists definitely get more tired on my MTB than my road bike.
Could be something as simple as your positioning on the bike, or the frame size too big/small? investigate that before shelling out. Unless of course you're wanting an excuse for t'other half. Wink

posted by Guanajuato [14 posts]
10th July 2013 - 8:26

3 Likes

Guanajuato wrote:
My arms & wrists definitely get more tired on my MTB than my road bike.
Could be something as simple as your positioning on the bike, or the frame size too big/small? investigate that before shelling out. Unless of course you're wanting an excuse for t'other half. Wink

Smile Always good to have an excuse and I reckon that will do nicely. I might get the "Why do you need two then?" response though Thinking

posted by goldtop [12 posts]
10th July 2013 - 8:47

4 Likes

There is always the n + 1 rule so meaning there is always room for one more bike!

Trust me Wink Cool

posted by Super Domestique [1641 posts]
10th July 2013 - 9:28

4 Likes

Super Domestique wrote:
There is always the n + 1 rule so meaning there is always room for one more bike!

Trust me Wink Cool

n + 1 rule applied and a 2012 Bianchi Nirone 7 is now on it's way.

I'll get my camera charged up for the pic thread Smile

posted by goldtop [12 posts]
10th July 2013 - 20:57

4 Likes

goldtop wrote:
n + 1 rule applied and a 2012 Bianchi Nirone 7 is now on it's way.

Nice one.

But I hope you realise that there's now a risk of being seriously embarrassed if you're even overtaken by a chav boy on a BSOs or hipsters/fakenger riding fixed Wink

Simon E's picture

posted by Simon E [2037 posts]
10th July 2013 - 21:29

3 Likes

Congrats and enjoy.

posted by Super Domestique [1641 posts]
10th July 2013 - 21:31

2 Likes

Thanks chaps Smile

Incidently, I fitted some 1.5 Schwalbe City Jets to my Bad Boy this morning (to replace the 1.95 CJs that I've been using). Went out for a 17 mile hilly ride and.....big difference both in pace and even more so in ride quality. Didn't expect that.

I'll let you know how I get on with the Bianchi.

posted by goldtop [12 posts]
10th July 2013 - 22:08

6 Likes

Hello There and welcome.

Firstly for the wrist/hand pain and numbness have you had A bike fit, to try and elimination factors . you could also toyed with the idea of two much pressure on your hands, try raising your handle bars to close to level with your seat . One thing that comes to mind is The pectoral and deltoid mussels, thinking about it you could be overpowering the rear deltoid, when this happens the head of the humerus to slip forwards. Try rotator cuff exercises to reduce numbness. If problem stills occurs try minimally padded gloves, grip improvers as we call them.

As or a new road bike you could have the same problem. Once again
• A bike fit
• Corked bar taped
• Gloves

To try and elimination the e wrist/hand pain and numbness have you had.

Knowing that you have choosing your road bike I will not say what I would of choosing at the end it is down to you to choses and not us.

I am sorry if this does not make scenes it is late in the night.

posted by Ashleyhoaken [37 posts]
10th July 2013 - 22:26

7 Likes

In the short term - while you decide on a new bike - try changing the handlebar grips to ones with more cushioning. Are you wearing gloves? Try investing in some gel gloves. Also, how much pressure do you have in your front wheel? 50psi should be your maximum I would think. Lastly, try rotating the bars slightly - rise bars can sometimes put your hands in strange positions - try loosening off the brake levers and shifters and experiment with different angles. Good luck!

posted by andy753 [7 posts]
13th July 2013 - 19:58

3 Likes

andy753 wrote:
In the short term - while you decide on a new bike - try changing the handlebar grips to ones with more cushioning. Are you wearing gloves? Try investing in some gel gloves. Also, how much pressure do you have in your front wheel? 50psi should be your maximum I would think. Lastly, try rotating the bars slightly - rise bars can sometimes put your hands in strange positions - try loosening off the brake levers and shifters and experiment with different angles. Good luck!

Thanks for this advice Andy....but please read further up the thread Wink

Thinner tyres seemed to have helped with my Bad Boy...a much smoother and swifter ride (26x1.5 at 85 PSI).

I've only given my new (used) Bianchi a couple of short rides out so far, just to get it set up and to sort out a few niggles. Think I'll also need to work on my technique to balance my weight more towards the rear of the bike and away from the bars. I believe this might have been part of my problem.

posted by goldtop [12 posts]
14th July 2013 - 9:05

3 Likes