Home
All the key things every new cyclist needs, from a bike to padded shorts and jerseys

Are you new to road cycling? The good thing is that it’s pretty easy to get into road cycling, and apart from the main purchase of a bicycle, it’s not the most expensive pastime you could pick from a long list of regular hobbies that British people partake in.

If you are looking to get into road cycling and you’re not sure what you need to get started, we’ve listed some of the key things you might want to consider. Top of the list is a bike, obviously, but beyond that, you really don’t need much else - just plenty of enthusiasm and energy to turn the pedals. As you find yourself getting more into cycling, there are a few useful things that can make cycling more comfortable and enjoyable.

We’ve listed some key road cycling products in order of importance, starting with...

1. A bike

BTwin Triban 520 - riding 3

BTwin Triban 520 - riding 3

An obvious one this, but if you’re going to take up cycling of any sort, you’re going to need a bike. Now is a really good time to buy a new road bike, there is a lot of choice at a huge range of prices, and the quality of bikes across the board is really good.

Sure, you can easily drop £10,000 on a Tour de France replica, but there are lots of bargains to be had for under £500 if you don't want to spend too much.

Read more: The Best Road Bike Bargains for under £500

Bikes come in many guises, this guide gives a good overview of the different types of road bike available on the market.

Read more: Beginner's guide to bike types

And if you're not sure where to start with buying a road bike, let us guide you to making the right decision, with this helpful guide.

Read more: Buying your first road bike — everything you need to know

2. Padded shorts

ashmei-mens-cycle-bib-shorts-riding.jpg

ashmei-mens-cycle-bib-shorts-riding.jpg

If you’re just planning on very short cycle rides, to the office or college, for example, you can get by just fine with regular clothes. There’s no need to wear anything special.

If you want to get into road cycling properly and tackle some longer distances, perhaps even enter a sportive or join your local club, a really good investment is a pair of padded shorts. Your bum will thank you.

They can be worn on their own, or concealed under baggy shorts if you prefer, and they provide a thin padding that provides a bit of cushioning against the saddle, and can substantially improve comfort on longer rides. Just remember, no underwear under padded shorts.

Read more: Cycling shorts — everything you need to know

You can spend anything from about £40 to over £300, so there really is something for all budgets. Here’s our buyer’s guide

Read more: Best cycling bib shorts — your buyer’s guide & 9 great choices

Read more: Best cheap cycling shorts

3. Cycling jersey

Bontrager RL Jersey.jpg

Bontrager RL Jersey.jpg

A cotton t-shirt might be just fine for shorter rides, but they’re not really designed for the demands of a longer cycle ride.

A cycling-specific jersey is made from a fabric designed to keep you cool in the heat, and keep you dry when you break a sweat. They also have a long zip for ventilation, and three rear pockets for carrying food and other supplies that you might need on longer trips.

Cycling jerseys also come in many varieties designed for different conditions, from cold weather to hot weather jerseys, and can be worn with other clothing accessories like arm warmers and gilets.

You can pay anything from £5 to £130 for a jersey, here’s our buyer’s guide.

Read more: Buyer's guide to summer cycling jerseys — plus 14 of the best

4. Water bottle and bottle cage

Camelbak Podium water bottle.jpg

Camelbak Podium water bottle.jpg

Cycling can be thirsty work, especially in the summer heat, so keeping hydrated on longer rides is of paramount importance. Most road bikes have bolts on the frame (down tube and seat tube) that allow you to fit a special bottle cage into which a cycling bottle can be fitted.

You can stick a bottle of Coke or Lucozade in a jersey pocket or even a bottle cage, but the former isn’t very comfortable and the latter isn't the most secure. A cycling water bottle can also be reused hundreds of times, is easy to clean and is easy to drink from on the move.

5. Pump, spare tube, basic tools and chain oil

Slime Pro Pre-filled Lite inner tube crop.jpg

Slime Pro Pre-filled Lite inner tube crop.jpg

There are two things that any cyclist embarking on a ride really shouldn’t leave home without, and that’s a spare inner tube and pump. Nobody plans to puncture, but they do happen from time to time, so it’s worth being prepared so you don’t have to phone home for a lift.

A local bike shop will help you choose the right size spare inner tube (or you can read our guide below), and a pump doesn’t have to cost a lost. You can carry both in a jersey pocket or backpack, or better still is to stash the inner tube in a saddle bag, and mount the pump to the frame with the often supplied brackets.

Read more: How to repair a punctured inner tube

Read more: Video: Greg LeMond shows how to quickly change an inner tube

Read more: Buyer's guide to inner tubes — how to save weight, ride faster or prevent flats with new tubes

GT All-Terra Multi tool.jpg

GT All-Terra Multi tool.jpg

Another thing you might want to consider is a multitool. Multitools are the cyclist's equivalent of a Swiss Army knife, with a range of tool bits that can be used to make adjustments to the bike, such as raising or lowering the saddle height or tweaking the gears.

If you are really getting into cycling and doing regular rides, you’ll want to keep the chain well oiled so the gears work smoothly and quietly. Chain oil, or lube as it’s commonly called, is available from any good bike shop and a small bottle lasts a long time and doesn’t cost much.

Juice Lubes Chain Juice Wax.jpg

Juice Lubes Chain Juice Wax.jpg

Read more: How to clean and lube your bike's chain

Read more: The best multi tools — get the right bits to fix your bike's bits

6. Computer

Garmin Edge 520 GPS Bike Computer.jpg

Garmin Edge 520 GPS Bike Computer.jpg

Because everyone wants to know how fast and far they’ve cycled, don’t they?

This isn’t an essential product at all, but as any cyclist knows all too well, the most likely question you get from friends, a partner or family after a ride is how far did you ride and how fast did you pedal? And if you are new to cycling, it’s fun to track your distance of a ride and use that to measure your progress as you get into road cycling.

Cycle computers can also show you how fast you’ve ridden, your average and max speeds, how much climbing you’ve done, and other measurements like cadence and heart rate. And as this guide below shows, they don't have to cost a fortune.

You can use a smartphone to record your ride using one of the many available apps, and this is another option, but a small dedicated computer fitted to your bike will cope with rain and hte battery will last a very long time. More expensive computers use GPS and can be plugged into a computer to download all the data.

Read more: Cycle computers — everything you need to know

BTwin 700 Road cycling Helmet.jpg

BTwin 700 Road cycling Helmet.jpg

And yes, we thought about including a helmet in this list, but as it’s not law to wear a helmet when cycling, we feel it’s up your own discretion whether you choose to wear a lid. If you feel safer wearing a helmet then go for it. Good cycling helmets can be bought for as little as £20, just make sure they comply with European standards, to look for certification stickers inside the helmet .

Read more: Best cheap cycling helmets

Is there anything we’ve missed? Let's hear your suggestions in the comment section.

David has worked on the road.cc tech team since July 2012. Previously he was editor of Bikemagic.com and before that staff writer at RCUK. He's a seasoned cyclist of all disciplines, from road to mountain biking, touring to cyclo-cross, he only wishes he had time to ride them all. He's mildly competitive, though he'll never admit it, and is a frequent road racer but is too lazy to do really well. He currently resides in the Cotswolds.

102 comments

Avatar
reippuert [70 posts] 1 year ago
9 likes

cycleings shoes & clipless pedal comes in way before the computer. A computer, come on its not exacly somthing that you need.

  1. Bike
  2. Padded shorts
  3. shoes (your feet will kill you if you ride in your sneakers)
  4. clipless pedals (your bike handleing improves hugely)
  5. pump
  6. patch-kit
  7. chain-oil
  8. Helmet (I know that it may be controversial anno 2016 - but 20 years ago people actually manged to ride without, among bikeracers with decent handling skills and trafic awareness i doubt that the helmet does anything to improve your safty. On a bicycle safty is foremost active - the helmet is a passive safty procedure)
  9. Jersy - nice to have, but not a must have. Though you'd look stupid if you dont have it, but not as stupid as if you are riding arround in a Team Sky  or Team Saxo jersy. (unless you are actually employed by either, i assume youre not driveing  you car wearing a policeuniform or firefighter uniform unless you are actually woriking as a policeman or firefighter).
  10. Bottle & cage (any plastic waterbottle from the supermarked can fit in your backpocket and it can be refilled too - big surprise. I managed to be a rodie for 5-10 years until i actually bought a bottle w. cage)
  11. multitool-kit (you dont need it, evryone has an allenkey or two laying arround from the last Ikea purchase, everyone has a flathead screwdriver as well)
  12. extra tubes - nice to have, but tubes can be patched and it doesnt take any longer than changeing the tube. Swapping tubes instead of patching is a behaveur introduced in the last 20 years. Throwing away a perfectly fine tubea is a total waste of resources, secondly people are throwing away their tubes roadside which really pises me off. Ride up mont Ventoux or your local roads after a rainy grand fondo and you will see way too many tubes roadside - somtimes you can even find tubular tyres - those i do pickup and recycle, i have found qiute a few expensive Vittoria Corsa's and Conti  Competitions roadside - perfectly repairable - some even only requres a drop of superglue and 10ml latex fluid).

∞ -1. Expensive carbon bike with 2 different sets of carbon wheels an a teamcar with driver.

    ∞.  Bicycle computer

Avatar
rix [172 posts] 1 year ago
8 likes
road.cc wrote:

...we feel it’s up your own discretion whether you choose to wear a lid.

I would say that it is very irresponsible on road.cc part to give such an advice, especially to new cyclists. New cyclists should be encouraged to wear helmets. There is no reason not to wear them.

Avatar
drosco [315 posts] 1 year ago
3 likes

+ Strava

Avatar
Topcat [39 posts] 1 year ago
5 likes

I would say a snood/buff is fairly important when riding in any sort of colder weather. You can layer  up and still be cold without one. It can help stop you getting a sore neck from a cold breeze over it. Even on warm days it will help keep the early morning chill off and can be worn over your mouth as you warm up to help stop throat burn.

 

The same goes for gloves in any less than perfect conditions!

Avatar
hawkinspeter [780 posts] 1 year ago
16 likes
rix wrote:
road.cc wrote:

...we feel it’s up your own discretion whether you choose to wear a lid.

I would say that it is very irresponsible on road.cc part to give such an advice, especially to new cyclists. New cyclists should be encouraged to wear helmets. There is no reason not to wear them.

There's lots of reasons to not wear a helmet: http://www.howiechong.com/journal/2014/2/bike-helmets

Also, there's precious little data to support the view that helmets increase riders' safety, so it's not irresponsible at all to leave it up to someone's discretion.

However, I do think they should have mentioned gloves. In my view, they're the number one safety item on a bike that are also beneficial for comfort as well. Whenever I've come off my bike, I've instinctively used my hands to protect me and I've been glad to have the gloves take the brunt of the damage.

Avatar
kukubau [1 post] 1 year ago
2 likes

[/quote]

There's lots of reasons to not wear a helmet: http://www.howiechong.com/journal/2014/2/bike-helmets

Also, there's precious little data to support the view that helmets increase riders' safety, so it's not irresponsible at all to leave it up to someone's discretion.

However, I do think they should have mentioned gloves. In my view, they're the number one safety item on a bike that are also beneficial for comfort as well. Whenever I've come off my bike, I've instinctively used my hands to protect me and I've been glad to have the gloves take the brunt of the damage.

[/quote]

 

biased and unfundamented.

 

Avatar
zanf [932 posts] 1 year ago
3 likes
hawkinspeter wrote:
rix wrote:
road.cc wrote:

...we feel it’s up your own discretion whether you choose to wear a lid.

I would say that it is very irresponsible on road.cc part to give such an advice, especially to new cyclists. New cyclists should be encouraged to wear helmets. There is no reason not to wear them.

There's lots of reasons to not wear a helmet: http://www.howiechong.com/journal/2014/2/bike-helmets

Also, there's precious little data to support the view that helmets increase riders' safety, so it's not irresponsible at all to leave it up to someone's discretion.

However, I do think they should have mentioned gloves. In my view, they're the number one safety item on a bike that are also beneficial for comfort as well. Whenever I've come off my bike, I've instinctively used my hands to protect me and I've been glad to have the gloves take the brunt of the damage.

Actually, lights need to be on that list, and in quite a high position. In the UK, they are a legal requirement, and will do more to prevent you being in a collision with another vehicle, than a helmet will at saving your noggin after one.

London Cyclist had a really good article a few years back by an RAF pilot on why you should always commute (or even on solo rides) with flashing lights even during the day [saccadic masking].

Avatar
HalfWheeler [620 posts] 1 year ago
2 likes
L.Willo wrote:

This is a cycling as sport article and has very little relevance for cycling as a viable transport option

And. So. What.

Avatar
FluffyKittenofT... [1642 posts] 1 year ago
7 likes
rix wrote:
road.cc wrote:

...we feel it’s up your own discretion whether you choose to wear a lid.

I would say that it is very irresponsible on road.cc part to give such an advice, especially to new cyclists. New cyclists should be encouraged to wear helmets. There is no reason not to wear them.

Pushing new cyclists to wear helmets risks discouraging new cyclists. Certainly when I first started it pissed me off when occasionally complete stranger cyclists would ask why I didn't have a helmet on.

Do people giving advice to new drivers start by suggesting it would be safer to not use a car for travel if any alternative is available? Stop strangers in cars and ask if they couldn't have walked or taken a bus?

Yet the reduction in total mobidity from a driver choosing another mode of transport where possible is greater than that which would result from a cyclist adding a helmet, so I don't see why people nag about one but not the other.

If one must give safety advice, I reckon it would be more useful to point out things like the dangers of the door-zone or riding in the gutter, and warn about how dangerously misleading a lot of painted-on "infrastructure" is. And even then one should be careful about how patronising one is about saying it.

Avatar
HalfWheeler [620 posts] 1 year ago
5 likes
L.Willo wrote:
HalfWheeler wrote:
L.Willo wrote:

This is a cycling as sport article and has very little relevance for cycling as a viable transport option

And. So. What.

And. So.....

I wrote a list of essentials for cyclists who don't give a toss about Strava but would like to get around safely and efficiently on the roads using a bicycle.

And. So. Do you want to comment on that list, or would you rather be a muppet and play the man not the ball, as usual?

 

Your point seems to be "My version of cycling is superior to others, we are we bothering about anything other than what I approve of? Step into line!".

But then that seems to be your MO in other threads: you alone have a monopoly on wisdom, everyone else is a dolt. I'm not the only one to notice.

Incidentally I see you couldn't resist it, another cyclist has died and you're wanking yourself blind with condescension on another thread about it. Enjoy.

Avatar
HalfWheeler [620 posts] 1 year ago
5 likes

You're accusing me of picking pointless fights? Haha, physician heal thyself!

Avatar
Simon E [3052 posts] 1 year ago
6 likes

Clipless pedals? Not needed. Pro cyclists, TTers, audaxers and tourists have all ridden perfectly well for decades without them.

Helmet? Not needed. It should go without saying, really (see above).

Computer? Not needed (see above).

Cycling jersey? Not needed. It's only a variation on a t-shirt, just buy a decent cut and/or size smaller if you don't like it to flap.

Water bottle? Not needed. Unless it's really hot a normal person can easily ride for up to 2 hours without needing a drink. This does not apply to fools who've bought into the hydration/electrolyte sales hype.

If you have tightened the bolts up properly you're unlikely to need a multi-tool.

Yes all these things can make cycling more enjoyable but they are definitely not *needed*. But since some people seem to put more effort into (or have more interest in) shopping than riding then these rather pointless listicles will continue to be published.

Avatar
Kadinkski [682 posts] 1 year ago
1 like

This is literally the most pointless thing i have ever read in my life. I blame myself. i don't understand why i kept reading. I knew it wouldn't get any better or suddenly become interesting after the dull opening gambit. Reading this was akin to watching a car crash and I feel dirty.

Avatar
Mungecrundle [807 posts] 1 year ago
21 likes

Six things that all new road cyclists need:

1. You must have a strong opinion about helmets. Don't worry, you need not actually have any understanding of materials science, neurological injury or statistical analysis.

2. Ditto the above re disc brakes. You don't even need to have tried them, there are plenty of tried and trusted phrases on both sides of the argument which you will quickly pick up from most cycling forums.

3. You must get a Road.CC account. This will provide you with a platform on which to pontificate on the above subjects and others: lights, mandatory insurance, hi vis clothing, shared cycle paths, steel v carbon v aluminium, tyres etc, there's pretty much something for everyone. Don't be shy!

4. Do not, whatever you do, spend more than £1k on your first bike. If you do spend more than £1k, tell people that it cost £1k. They will be suitably impressed, tell them it cost any more and they will think you are a dick.

5. A mobile phone - Bollocks to all that fixing punctures at the side of the road crap. Call the missus at the first sign of trouble or bad weather to come pick you up.

6. Spend some time developing a keen sense of paranoia. Trawl youtube for 'bike rage' helmet cam videos. You will quickly get an understanding that most car drivers are crazed homicidal lunatics and that most helmet cam posters are crazed suicidal lunatics. With a bit of practice you should not be able to ride more than 100yds without coming into conflict with another road user. Then come here and bitch about it.

 

Enjoy

Avatar
rjfrussell [390 posts] 1 year ago
16 likes

The thing every new cyclist needs the most:  below a well meant article to help him/ her, a vitriolic, finger-jabbing, small-cocked, spittle-flecked series of post from supposedly keen cyclists.  That'll certainly encourage people to get on the saddle.

Avatar
MartyMcCann [268 posts] 1 year ago
4 likes
rjfrussell wrote:

The thing every new cyclist needs the most:  below a well meant article to help him/ her, a vitriolic, finger-jabbing, small-cocked, spittle-flecked series of post from supposedly keen cyclists.  That'll certainly encourage people to get on the saddle.

 

It now seems getting involved in their first  helmet debate on Road.cc is now as much a rite of passage for new cyclists as the first time they forget to unclip before stopping...

Avatar
unconstituted [2341 posts] 1 year ago
3 likes

Strava account, or similar. Amazing how good Strava is for getting people hooked. My other half spends ages looking at her ride afterwards and it helps that she has friends on it too. 

Avatar
Jem PT [130 posts] 1 year ago
1 like

Well my only issue with the list is on the cycling shorts - the bit where it says don't wear underwear. I've always worn underwear under my cycling shorts. Am I the only one??

Avatar
hawkinspeter [780 posts] 1 year ago
11 likes
Jem PT wrote:

Well my only issue with the list is on the cycling shorts - the bit where it says don't wear underwear. I've always worn underwear under my cycling shorts. Am I the only one??

Yes. Yes, you are.

Avatar
riotgibbon [228 posts] 1 year ago
4 likes
rjfrussell wrote:

The thing every new cyclist needs the most:  below a well meant article to help him/ her, a vitriolic, finger-jabbing, small-cocked, spittle-flecked series of post from supposedly keen cyclists.  That'll certainly encourage people to get on the saddle.

 

one of the great things about cycling is the opportunities to discover how you're doing it all wrong. Of course, the internet allows many, many more such thrilling encounters than would have been possible for my dear Grandparents in the inter-war Clarion Club, but remember this ...

 

on this forum, you only get told you are doing it wrong by cyclists who have also accepted the correctness of using a computer. If you join a club, then you might still be lucky enough to be told that you are doing it all wrong by those who regard computers as stupid and wrong - and now you're into a whole new area!

 

all the above - good quality gloves and lights depending on your journey, mudguards if you don't like a wet arse, and you only really see the value of good shorts once you've had them then don't - I did a quick ride the other day just in normal shorts and what turned out to be a very loose fitting pair of undergarments beneath. Dear lord, it was 10 minutes of very gingerly altering position to and fro until I got back, terrified I was going to geld myself. Now I remember what is so important about good shorts, I don't notice they are there ...

 

just ride your bike, it's great. I took my boy on an Evans Ride-It yesterday. It was in an area I thought I knew, but it mainly all roads I'd never been on, sun shone, I met an old friend, my boy smashed his distance record ... it was awesome,  riding for fun, not to get to work or before dawn in the rain - normally the only chances I get to go out.   Just ride, you will figure out what's important after a while

Avatar
MuddyGoose [53 posts] 1 year ago
2 likes
hawkinspeter wrote:
Jem PT wrote:

Well my only issue with the list is on the cycling shorts - the bit where it says don't wear underwear. I've always worn underwear under my cycling shorts. Am I the only one??

Yes. Yes, you are.

No. No, you're not.

Do what you find most comfortable.

Avatar
Danger Dicko [285 posts] 1 year ago
5 likes
rix wrote:
road.cc wrote:

...we feel it’s up your own discretion whether you choose to wear a lid.

I would say that it is very irresponsible on road.cc part to give such an advice, especially to new cyclists. New cyclists should be encouraged to wear helmets. There is no reason not to wear them.

Oh how I loved not having to dress as a cyclist while riding a bike in Copenhagen over the weekend.

Avatar
Yorkshire wallet [1253 posts] 1 year ago
2 likes

Where's power meter on the list?

I've just got one and now I spend my time not looking where I'm going. Good job I remembered the helmet.

As for helmets, some people just won't be told. My mate got wiped out without a helmet on, fractured skull, coma for 2 weeks.....comes back after long and painful rehab....still won't wear a helmet.

Avatar
bigmel [116 posts] 1 year ago
3 likes

cheer riotgibbon, your post made me smile. There's no end of people telling you what to do/not do. I use a 9 year old Garmin unit to navigate, but when I led a CTC ride last year  some riders looked at me like I was using witchcraft !

Oh, and definitely do what is most comfortable - how people laugh at my gloves . . . but I'm not the one with cold fingers.

 

Avatar
Simon E [3052 posts] 1 year ago
4 likes
hawkinspeter wrote:
Jem PT wrote:

Well my only issue with the list is on the cycling shorts - the bit where it says don't wear underwear. I've always worn underwear under my cycling shorts. Am I the only one??

Yes. Yes, you are.

No, he's not. I know someone who didn't find this out until she rode a 50 mile time trial. Ouch! Needless to say, she has never wore anything under her padded shorts since.

Avatar
hawkinspeter [780 posts] 1 year ago
2 likes
kukubau wrote:
hawkinspeter wrote:

There's lots of reasons to not wear a helmet: http://www.howiechong.com/journal/2014/2/bike-helmets

Also, there's precious little data to support the view that helmets increase riders' safety, so it's not irresponsible at all to leave it up to someone's discretion.

However, I do think they should have mentioned gloves. In my view, they're the number one safety item on a bike that are also beneficial for comfort as well. Whenever I've come off my bike, I've instinctively used my hands to protect me and I've been glad to have the gloves take the brunt of the damage.

 

biased and unfundamented.

 

Thanks for your input. I would argue your point, but I have no idea what it is, nor what "unfundamented" means. Can anyone translate that into English for me please?

Avatar
hawkinspeter [780 posts] 1 year ago
2 likes
MuddyGoose wrote:
hawkinspeter wrote:
Jem PT wrote:

Well my only issue with the list is on the cycling shorts - the bit where it says don't wear underwear. I've always worn underwear under my cycling shorts. Am I the only one??

Yes. Yes, you are.

No. No, you're not.

Do what you find most comfortable.

Wearing underwear under cycling shorts may be comfortable for a while, but cycling shorts are designed to be worn next to the skin so it should be more comfortable to wear them as designed. It's not a "rule" to be obeyed - just advice.

Avatar
Edgeley [464 posts] 1 year ago
5 likes

Is this the £25 30 comment helmet argument or the full £75 200 commenter?

Avatar
adamthekiwi [148 posts] 1 year ago
6 likes
hawkinspeter wrote:
kukubau wrote:
hawkinspeter wrote:

There's lots of reasons to not wear a helmet: http://www.howiechong.com/journal/2014/2/bike-helmets

Also, there's precious little data to support the view that helmets increase riders' safety, so it's not irresponsible at all to leave it up to someone's discretion.
-8<- snip for brevity ->8-

biased and unfundamented.

Thanks for your input. I would argue your point, but I have no idea what it is, nor what "unfundamented" means. Can anyone translate that into English for me please?

I'm going to guess that 'unfundamented' means: "without an arsehole".

I like it as a word. I intend to work it into at least one sentence a day for the next 6 weeks.

Avatar
fenix [671 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes
zanf wrote:
hawkinspeter wrote:
rix wrote:
road.cc wrote:

...we feel it’s up your own discretion whether you choose to wear a lid.

I would say that it is very irresponsible on road.cc part to give such an advice, especially to new cyclists. New cyclists should be encouraged to wear helmets. There is no reason not to wear them.

There's lots of reasons to not wear a helmet: http://www.howiechong.com/journal/2014/2/bike-helmets

Also, there's precious little data to support the view that helmets increase riders' safety, so it's not irresponsible at all to leave it up to someone's discretion.

However, I do think they should have mentioned gloves. In my view, they're the number one safety item on a bike that are also beneficial for comfort as well. Whenever I've come off my bike, I've instinctively used my hands to protect me and I've been glad to have the gloves take the brunt of the damage.

Actually, lights need to be on that list, and in quite a high position. In the UK, they are a legal requirement, and will do more to prevent you being in a collision with another vehicle, than a helmet will at saving your noggin after one.

London Cyclist had a really good article a few years back by an RAF pilot on why you should always commute (or even on solo rides) with flashing lights even during the day [saccadic masking].

 

Lights are a legal requirement in the UK?  Since when ??

Pages