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How to decide between these two top-end electronic groupsets

If you’re choosing between Shimano Dura-Ace 9150 Di2 and SRAM Red eTap electronic groupsets, lucky you! Here’s how the two different systems compare.

Shimano first introduced Dura-Ace Di2 in 2009 and then added an electronic version of its next-level-down Ultegra groupset in 2011. A new version of Dura-Ace Di2 – R9150 – has recently been launched.

Read our complete guide to Shimano road bike groupsets here. 

SRAM launched Red eTap in 2015. The single biggest difference from Di2 is that Red eTap shifting is wireless. Di2 runs from a single battery that’s usually hidden inside the seat post with cables running to the various components. Red eTap has separate batteries in each of the shifters and derailleurs. Shift signals are transmitted and received in accordance with SRAM’s proprietary wireless protocol known as Airea.

Here’s our complete guide to SRAM road bike groupsets. 

Other electronic groupsets are available for road bikes. Campagnolo offers electronic versions of its Super Record, Record and Chorus groupsets and FSA says that it will launch a K-Force WE semi-wireless electronic groupset (where the derailleurs are linked by a cable but communication with the shifters is wireless) later in 2017.

Here's our SRAM Red eTap review. 

And here's our First Ride: Shimano Dura-Ace 9150 Di2.

Here’s how Shimano Dura-Ace R9150 Di2 and SRAM Red eTap compare in key areas.

Initial setup 

If you’re building up a frame from scratch, nothing is simpler than fitting SRAM Red eTap. You bolt the various parts in place, you pair them up – and that’s it. You’re talking about 15 minutes. Genuinely. 

SRAM RED eTap FD.jpg

SRAM RED eTap FD.jpg

Di2 is more complicated in that you need to run the wires internally – which may or may not be straightforward, depending on your frame – and you usually need to fit the battery internally too. 

You need a Junction A unit to connect the shifters to the rest of the system. With 9150 Di2 this fits either into the frame or into the end of the handlebar. If you go for the handlebar version you need a hole in the handlebar itself by which the wire can exit. 

You also need a Di2 wireless unit to allow the system to communicate via ANT private protocol with head units (such as a Garmin Edge bike computer) and your smartphone, tablet or PC. 

We’re not saying that fitting R9150 Di2 to a bike is especially complicated, but it isn’t as simple as fitting eTap.

It’s worth pointing out that this is a one-time job. Unlike with mechanical shifting, you’ll probably never need to replace the cables. And if you’re buying a built up bike you don’t need to worry about the initial setup anyway.

Check out our review of SRAM Red eTap. 

In use

SRAM RED eTap Shifter

SRAM RED eTap Shifter

With Red eTap you perform shifts via a paddle that sits behind the brake lever. You push the paddle on the right shifter inward to move the chain to a smaller sprocket. You push the paddle on the left shifter inward to move the chain to a larger sprocket. You can hold each paddle in those shift positions to perform multiple shifts – if you want to go from the bottom of the cassette up to the top, say, you just push the left paddle and hold it there. You push both paddles together to shift from one chainring to the other.

When he reviewed SRAM Red eTap Dave Arthur said, "The feel of the shift levers is a highlight... There is no [possibility of pressing the wrong button] with eTap. No accidentally shifting into the wrong gear, because the paddle only has one task, and your brain doesn't forget which is which. This improved feel of the groupset is, for me at least,  far superior to Di2. It makes eTap a joy to use."

You can’t customise the function of SRAM eTap. The brand reckons this would add an unnecessary level of complexity to the system.

"On the whole, the shifting is very quick and crisp," said Dave Arthur. "Most of the time, trying to distinguish whether eTap is slower to shift than mechanical Red or Dura-Ace Di2 is impossible. It's as fast as you need, with no lag or delay when requesting another gear, whether you're cruising or in a chain gang.

"Shifting works well under load, whether working up the cassette when sprinting out of the saddle, or changing down from the big ring when climbing out of the saddle."

Shimano 9150 on Giant - 46.jpg

Shimano 9150 on Giant - 46.jpg

In contrast to eTap, Shimano Dura-Ace R9150 Di2 is highly customisable. By default, the left-hand shifter controls the front derailleur and the right-hand shifter controls the rear derailleur. Each has two buttons located behind the brake lever, one for upshifts and the other for downshifts, and another button hidden under the hood cover.

You can use Shimano’s new E-Tube Project software on a PC, iPad or smartphone to set any of these six buttons to upshift or downshift either of the two derailleurs. Each of these buttons can have two different functions, one when you press it and the other when you press and hold it. 

You can set Di2 buttons to change the display on a Garmin Edge bike computer. Shimano invites third party manufacturers to come up with other uses for the buttons, which send commands via a private ANT+ protocol, so functionality could be increased in future.

The R9150 Di2 buttons have a more pronounced click to them than previous versions. This means that you always know whether or not you've pressed a button, although our experience is that you can occasionally hit the wrong one when riding in big winter gloves because they're positioned so close together.

In terms of shifting performance, it's hard to fault Dura-Ace R9150 Di2. It's fast and super reliable via both the front and rear derailleurs and in either direction.

Shimano’s Synchro Shift

Shimano Dura-Ace R9150 Di2 offers Synchro Shift which is a feature new to road cycling. The new Junction A unit (below) allows you to switch between shift modes: manual, semi-Synchro Shift or full Synchro Shift.

Shimano 9150 on Giant - 14.jpg

Shimano 9150 on Giant - 14.jpg

Manual is straightforward: one button moves the rear derailleur one way, another button moves it the other way, and it’s similar set up for the front mech.

If you go to full Synchro Shift, you simply press a button for a lower gear and the Di2 system will move you to the next lowest gear available even if that means shifting chainrings. One push of a button and the system could move you from the large chainring to the small chainring, and from a large sprocket to a smaller sprocket.  

Shimano 9150 on Giant - 42.jpg

Shimano 9150 on Giant - 42.jpg

If you were using the small chainring and one of the small sprockets and pressed the button to move to a higher gear, the system might move you automatically to the large chainring and a larger sprocket. 

Synchro Shift is fully customisable. You can go into Shimano’s user-friendly E-Tube app and decide what will happen when you press up or down from any chainring/sprocket combination. 

Shimano 9150 on Giant - 22.jpg

Shimano 9150 on Giant - 22.jpg

Why would you want to use Synchro Shift on the road? It has really been introduced for time trial and triathlon where you can have just one bar end shifter on the left aero bar and another on the right. However, if you want to use it on a standard road bike, it is an option.

There is currently no warning beep to let you know when the front derailleur is going to move the chain from one chainring to the other, which would allow you to adjust the amount of pressure you’re putting on the pedals accordingly, although Garmin will bring in this feature via its Edge bike computers, and any other computer brand that cares to can do the same.

The semi-Synchro Shift option might be of more interest to road bike users. With semi Synchro Shift, when you move the front derailleur the rear derailleur will automatically move the chain a certain number of sprockets at the same time. 

Shimano 9150 on Giant - 25.jpg

Shimano 9150 on Giant - 25.jpg

Say you’re moving from the small chainring to the large chainring. In normal circumstances this would increase the size of the gear by a considerable margin, right? With semi-Synchro Shift enabled, the system will move the chain up the cassette to reduce that margin and keep your cadence more consistent. 

Moving from the large chainring to the small chainring would usually reduce the size of the gear by a large chunk so Di2 will automatically move the chain down the cassette to reduce the jump. 

If you’re an experienced bike rider you probably do this yourself a lot of the time without even thinking about it. 

Mapping the gears – deciding the specifics of how Synchro Shift and semi Synchro Shift work – is simple via Shimano’s E-Tube software which you can run on a PC, iPad or a smartphone. 

Satellite shifters

Shimano SW-R9150 - 1.jpg

Shimano SW-R9150 - 1.jpg

You can add Shimano’s sprint shifters (SW-R610) and climbing shifters (SW-R9150, above)) to allow you to change gear more easily from the top of your handlebar or from the drops.

Similarly, SRAM offers Red eTap Blips (above) which are satellite buttons. A Blip links to a shifter via a cable – the only cable in the eTap system. Pressing a Blip connected to the right shifter moves the rear mech outboard; pressing a Blip connected to the left shifter moves the rear mech inboard, and pressing a Blip connected to the left shifter at the same time as pressing a Blip connected to the right shifter moves the chain from one chainring to the other.

You can position Blips on the tops of your handlebar for use when you’re climbing or on the drops for shifting when you sprint. They can go either underneath your handlebar tape or out in the open.

Battery life

Each SRAM eTap component has its own battery. The derailleurs’ rechargeable batteries offer power for over 1,000km (625 miles) of typical riding while the widely available CR2032 button cell batteries in the shifters need changing on average about once every two years, according to SRAM.

You can check the charge of different components at any time. LED lights indicate the current level of charge.

If you ignore these LEDs and allow the rear mech battery to run out, you can swap the front mech battery on to the rear, foregoing front shifting for the journey home.

If you run out of both, you can manually put the chain onto the gear you want and ride home singlespeed.

SRAM RED eTap Charger.jpg

SRAM RED eTap Charger.jpg

Recharging a derailleur battery is simply a case of unclipping it and putting it on the USB-powered charger for 45 minutes.

When the shifters’ CR2012 batteries run low you simply swap new ones into the ports in the hoods.

The Shimano BT-DN110 Di2 internal mounted battery can last between 1,000km and 2,000km between charges, depending on conditions and the amount of shifting you do. 

Shimano_bt_dn110_di2_internal_mount_battery.jpg

Shimano_bt_dn110_di2_internal_mount_battery.jpg

The battery is usually fitted inside the seatpost although it can be accommodated elsewhere within the frame. You can check how much charge remains via lights on the Junction A unit.

If the battery runs low the front derailleur will stop working first. If you run out of juice entirely you can position the chain on a sprocket of your choice and ride home in a single gear. 

Gear ranges

Shimano Dura-Ace chainsets are available in five different variations:  50-34T (a 50-tooth outer chainring and a 34-tooth inner chainring), 52-36T, 53-39T, 54-42T and 55-42T with seven crank arm lengths from 165 to 180mm. 

Shimano 9150 on Giant - 26.jpg

Shimano 9150 on Giant - 26.jpg

The RD-R9150 rear derailleur (only one cage length is available) will take cassettes with a minimum sprocket size of 11 teeth and a maximum sprocket size of 30 teeth. 

SRAM_red_crank_bb30_5339_black_front_l.jpg

SRAM_red_crank_bb30_5339_black_front_l.jpg

SRAM Red chainsets are available in 46-36T, 50-34T, 52-36T and 53-39T versions and in six crank arm lengths from 165mm to 177.5mm. 

SRAM Red eTap - rear mech.jpg

SRAM Red eTap - rear mech.jpg

Unlike the Dura-Ace rear derailleur, the Red eTap one comes in short cage and medium cage versions. The short cage will take sprockets with a maximum size of 28 teeth while the medium one will work with sprockets up to 32 teeth, so you can get very low gears with eTap as long as you buy the correct rear derailleur.

Disc brakes

Both Shimano Dura-Ace Di2 and SRAM Red eTap groupsets are available with hydraulic disc braking.

The Shimano Dura-Ace R9170 dual control levers and hydraulic disc brakes are the first that Shimano has included within the Dura-Ace groupset. Previously, you could get Dura-Ace compatible disc brakes but they weren’t actually part of the group. 

Shimano 9170  - 4.jpg

Shimano 9170 - 4.jpg

The R9170 dual control levers are almost the same shape as the R9100s (for mechanical shifting and cable operated rim brakes) and the R9150s (for Di2 shifting and cable-operated rim brakes). There’s no bulbous front end like you get on some earlier Shimano designs, the hydraulic reservoir being positioned in the centre of the lever body. The only real difference is that the R9170 design is a bit more of a handful where the hydraulic hose exits at the upper inner edge. 

As well as offering reach adjustment, the R9170 levers have free stroke adjustment allowing you to tune the amount the lever moves before the pads touch the rotor.  

Shimano 9170  - 5.jpg

Shimano 9170 - 5.jpg

The R9170 brakes, available in flat mount only, work beautifully whatever the conditions. You know the brakes are going to bite exactly when you want them to so there’s no need to give the levers a squeeze a second or two in advance just to be on the safe side. It doesn’t matter how wet the roads and the rims are, these brakes work, it’s as simple as that. 

Yes, there’s a small drop off in performance in wet weather but it’s nowhere near the magnitude you see with rim brakes. That gives you the confidence to keep pushing your speed in situations when you might potentially soon need to slow down, like going into a tight corner. In some circumstances it might be the difference between getting into a break and missing the train.

SRAM Red eTap HRD Eurobike 2016  - 16.jpg

SRAM Red eTap HRD Eurobike 2016 - 16.jpg

SRAM Red eTap HRD Shift-Brake Controls have a higher front end than their Shimano counterparts with the hydraulic master cylinder positioned in the nose. You can adjust the contact point – when your brakes engage – and reach to the lever.

SRAM Red eTap HRD Eurobike 2016  - 10.jpg

SRAM Red eTap HRD Eurobike 2016 - 10.jpg

Both post mount and flat mount brake brake callipers are available.

Power meter

SRAM offers power measurement via its Red Quarq power meter chainset. This comes with carbon arms and a machined alloy spider.

SRAM Red eTap HRD Eurobike 2016  - 13.jpg

SRAM Red eTap HRD Eurobike 2016 - 13.jpg

Power measurement is based on five strain gauges in the crank spider. SRAM claims +/-1.5% accuracy and you can get left/right power balance.

The system uses a replaceable CR2032 battery and has an IPX7 waterproof rating. Shimano power meter - 6.jpg

The latest version of Dura-Ace offers power measurement for the first time. The FC-R9100-P is a chainset with an integrated power meter. Strain gauges sit inside the crank arms to measure left and right leg power. The power meter ‘brain’ sits inside the Dura-Ace driveside spider. 

Shimano power meter - 3.jpg

An integrated rechargeable battery powers the unit. It can be charged with a small magnetic adapter without needing to remove covers or casings. 

Shimano tells us it has thoroughly tested the power meter to a very high waterproof standard, but it has not provided an IPX rating at this stage. 

Check out our guide to choosing a cycling power meter.

Overall

These are the manufacturers' claimed weights for the various components of each groupset. We're comparing rim brake versions of each groupset here (the SRAM figures include batteries where applicable).

 

Shimano DA Di2 SRAM Red eTap weights.jpg

Shimano DA Di2 SRAM Red eTap weights.jpg

According to these figures, SRAM Red eTap edges it in terms of weight, but it’s a small difference.

Here are the recommended retail prices of the various parts of each of the groupset. Again, we’re talking about rim brake setups. Shop around and you'll find them cheaper.

Shimano DA Di2 SRAM Red eTap prices.jpg

Shimano DA Di2 SRAM Red eTap prices.jpg

According to these figures, SRAM Red eTap is nearly £800 cheaper at full retail price. 

Both Shimano Dura-Ace R9150 Di2 and SRAM Red eTap are superb groupsets, as you’d expect. These are, after all, the top tier in the range of their respective brands and they’re used for racing at the very highest level, and we’re split in the road.cc office as to which we prefer.

Each shifts well and you really shouldn’t run out of charge while you’re on the road providing you get into the habit of checking battery levels regularly.

In terms of function, the biggest difference between the two groupsets is the way that you change gear (see ‘In use’ above), and your choice might come down to whether you prefer SRAM’s design or Shimano’s, bearing in mind that you can customise a Shimano set-up to a large degree.

Mat has worked for loads of bike magazines over 20+ years, and been editor of 220 Triathlon and Cycling Plus. He's been road.cc technical editor for eight years, testing bikes, fettling the latest kit, and trying out the most up-to-the-minute clothing. We send him off around the world to get all the news from launches and shows too. He has won his category in Ironman UK 70.3 and finished on the podium in both marathons he has run. Mat is a Cambridge graduate who did a post-grad in magazine journalism, and he is a past winner of the Cycling Media Award for Specialist Online Writer.

23 comments

Avatar
surly_by_name [546 posts] 8 months ago
1 like

Is syncro shift such a great idea? I modify my pedal stroke (very slightly) when shifting on front ring to reduce load on drive train when shifting so as to avoid dropping my chain. When using syncro shift - when you don't know whether you are going to have big ring/little ring/big ring shift, you wouldn't know to soft pedal. Would this produce more dropped chains?

Avatar
turboprannet [274 posts] 8 months ago
3 likes

who wrapped that Pro bar tape?? terrible.

Avatar
Al__S [1254 posts] 8 months ago
1 like

I guess the beauty of the synchro shift system is that you can try it, if you don't find it works for you, can disable it.

Avatar
simondbarnes [55 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes
Quote:

(you can use an adaptor for IS mount frames)

I'm pretty sure you can't. Or to a post mount frame.

Avatar
part_robot [259 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes

I found out the other day that eTap Hydr is retailling at £1800 online (and WiFli will no doubt be even more when it's available). I dunno whether or not it's my age or I've finally come to my senses, but that seems like an astonishingly large amount of money even by the standards of this industry... 

Avatar
userfriendly [616 posts] 8 months ago
2 likes

Why the omission of Record / Super Record EPS v3?

It's top-end, and it's newer than eTap.

Is it because it's Campagnolo?  I'm sensing a bias here.

Avatar
Prosper0 [104 posts] 8 months ago
1 like
userfriendly wrote:

Why the omission of Record / Super Record EPS v3?

It's top-end, and it's newer than eTap.

Is it because it's Campagnolo?  I'm sensing a bias here.

Because it wouldn't have been a fair fight with Super Record EPS on there yes

Avatar
Twowheelsaregreat [86 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes

Here I am sitting down tired after a days work and reading about all this electronic gadgetry and thinking it all sounds so complicated.

Disc brakes I love, which to some are complicated to set up but pretty much fit and forget, but batteries that run down and then you have to remember to charge them? This is why I love dynamo lights as they are pretty much fit and forget and so much less faff than bettery lights. You forget to charge your rear light then you're in trouble.

Why can't they make electronic gears charge from the dynamo too? The Shimano battery is 7.2v. If they introduced a little gizmo that could step the 5v dynamo voltage up to something that could charge the Di2 battery then I might be more persuaded to adopt it. Until then I just know I'm going to run out of charge at some point whilst out in the sticks.

I'll stick to cable operated gears for a while longer.

Avatar
I love my bike [211 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes
userfriendly wrote:

Why the omission of Record / Super Record EPS v3?

It's top-end, and it's newer than eTap.

Is it because it's Campagnolo?  I'm sensing a bias here.

I assume it's because they haven't released a disc brake system so far?

Avatar
part_robot [259 posts] 8 months ago
2 likes
Twowheelsaregreat wrote:

Here I am sitting down tired after a days work and reading about all this electronic gadgetry and thinking it all sounds so complicated....

Yeah, I'm with you there. Electronic is not without its problems - I've faced the system crashing and leaving me stuck in a gear (needing a firmwear upgrade), cables coming loose and yes forgetting to charge it. But then it it requires zero maintainance (apart from charging once every month or so), no cables to gum up, self-adjusting trim, never misses a shift and so on. Neither system is perfect, but it'll be hard for me to go back to mech...

Avatar
userfriendly [616 posts] 8 months ago
1 like
I love my bike wrote:
userfriendly wrote:

Why the omission of Record / Super Record EPS v3?

It's top-end, and it's newer than eTap.

Is it because it's Campagnolo?  I'm sensing a bias here.

I assume it's because they haven't released a disc brake system so far?

But disc brakes are only mentioned briefly as an aside in this article which appears to be about "top-end electronic groupsets", merely going quickly over their features which they could have done just as well with the Campag prototypes.

And the "Overall" section omits them entirely in favour of the rim brake option, so I'm really not seeing any valid reason not to include Campagnolo in this line-up, disc brakes or no disc brakes.

Avatar
Cyclespeed Tours [42 posts] 8 months ago
1 like

We've reviewed Di2 9150 and it has it's pluses and minuses;

+ Customizable

+ when it works, it works very well

+ new rear mech is very neat, light and low profile

+ shifters now have positive feel

- expensive; way more than SRAM

- new IOS app is VERY buggy and needs sorting. Locked up my system first time round. Only just (today) compatible with 9150.

- Synchro Shift, in all guises is of no interest to me

- by default, they stop you using small front with 10 and 11 rear. (Anti cross chain) This is annoying!

 

Avatar
simonsays [25 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes
Cyclespeed Tours wrote:

- by default, they stop you using small front with 10 and 11 rear. (Anti cross chain) This is annoying!

 

 

Is this something you need to disable on a laptop? Seems a rediculous restriction to have as default!

Avatar
michophull [143 posts] 8 months ago
3 likes

I'm still not convinced that any of this is better than downtube shifters. 

Avatar
PaulBox [675 posts] 8 months ago
1 like
userfriendly wrote:

Why the omission of Record / Super Record EPS v3?

It's top-end, and it's newer than eTap.

Is it because it's Campagnolo?  I'm sensing a bias here.

Maybe it's because the title says "Head to head: Shimano Dura-Ace R9150 Di2 v SRAM Red eTap"

Would be a bit stupid if they started talking about Campag wouldn't it...

 

Avatar
Valbrona [212 posts] 8 months ago
0 likes

Far-East manufactured kit is just so ... dull and uninspiring.

Avatar
baker4400 [1 post] 2 months ago
0 likes
surly_by_name wrote:

Is syncro shift such a great idea? I modify my pedal stroke (very slightly) when shifting on front ring to reduce load on drive train when shifting so as to avoid dropping my chain. When using syncro shift - when you don't know whether you are going to have big ring/little ring/big ring shift, you wouldn't know to soft pedal. Would this produce more dropped chains?

 

I  run Syncrho shift on 2 bikes and think that it's a substantial upgrade.  In busy traffic or a fast paceline, it really helps that the front shift occurs without easing up or looking down to check the gear positions.

Di2 double-beeps to alert me to a pending front shift (on next upshift or downshift), so there's no surprise.

If I want, I can still manually shift the front derailleur.  Di2 flawlessly makes front shift under full power.  Di2 is widely used by elite racers, and they don't ease while shifting to launch an attack or do a full-out sprint.  Have you ever heard of a racer dropping a chain?

 

Avatar
Cedru [1 post] 2 months ago
0 likes

This comparison between Dura Ace Di2 and eTap is very interesting. However, an important feature is missing in the comparison, namely the possibility to display the current gear/chainring on the screen of a Garmin Edge. With the Di2 (both Dura Ace and Ultegra) it is possible to pair the group with the Garmin Edge 520 (and probably with other units in the Edge series). It seems to me that this feature gives a clear advantage to the Di2 against eTap as well as against any other group, either electronic or mechanical. No need to look down to check your gear positions! 

The wireless solution is certainly elegant, but one has to deal with four batteries. 

Avatar
MandaiMetric [131 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes
baker4400 wrote:

Have you ever heard of a racer dropping a chain?

I think Andy Schleck has.

see also Boonen at Flanders this year.

Avatar
Sub4 [48 posts] 4 days ago
0 likes
surly_by_name wrote:

Is syncro shift such a great idea? I modify my pedal stroke (very slightly) when shifting on front ring to reduce load on drive train when shifting so as to avoid dropping my chain. When using syncro shift - when you don't know whether you are going to have big ring/little ring/big ring shift, you wouldn't know to soft pedal. Would this produce more dropped chains?

I have 9170. The Garmin bleeps when your next shift will swap chainrings. If I want to shift rings myself (oh, the effort...) I can do so. Basically it works in the background.

Avatar
Sub4 [48 posts] 4 days ago
0 likes
userfriendly wrote:

Why the omission of Record / Super Record EPS v3?

It's top-end, and it's newer than eTap.

Is it because it's Campagnolo?  I'm sensing a bias here.

I have a Dura Ace Di2 bike and a Campag EPS V3 Rec/Srec mix on another. The shifting is crisp, super quick & the ergonomics are best in class. Never mis-shift with Campag. Often do with Di2. ( but I love them both).

Avatar
Sub4 [48 posts] 4 days ago
0 likes
Cyclespeed Tours wrote:

We've reviewed Di2 9150 and it has it's pluses and minuses;

+ Customizable

+ when it works, it works very well

+ new rear mech is very neat, light and low profile

+ shifters now have positive feel

- expensive; way more than SRAM

- new IOS app is VERY buggy and needs sorting. Locked up my system first time round. Only just (today) compatible with 9150.

- Synchro Shift, in all guises is of no interest to me

- by default, they stop you using small front with 10 and 11 rear. (Anti cross chain) This is annoying!

 

I think you mean 11 & 12! I agree. This is a real irritation. I ride a lot in W Yorks. Often I’m in 52/11 screaming into a 25% wall on the other side. When you want to get the small ring, you blip the front mech, but all it does is drop 2 gears on the cassette (because it won’t let you use the 11&12 in the small ring). Too many times it’s left me in the big ring & I’m grovelling before the brain kicks in & reminds me that I still have the small ring to fall back on. The guys at Madison say there is a way to disable this, but I’ve not managed it yet.

Avatar
Thelma Viaduct [60 posts] 4 days ago
0 likes
surly_by_name wrote:

Is syncro shift such a great idea? I modify my pedal stroke (very slightly) when shifting on front ring to reduce load on drive train when shifting so as to avoid dropping my chain. When using syncro shift - when you don't know whether you are going to have big ring/little ring/big ring shift, you wouldn't know to soft pedal. Would this produce more dropped chains?

 

Did you bother to read the review???