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Money saving tips that'll save your arse, clean your chain, and much, much more

Most of us like to treat ourselves to cool new bike stuff from time to time but there's a place for saving money too, so here are some tips for using everyday alternatives to expensive cycling products.

Some of these suggestions come from the road.cc team and some come from readers.

If you have any more to add, sling them in the comments at the bottom. Oh, and if you want to give us any Viz Top Tips-style suggestions, try to make sure they're funny!

Slap on the udder cream

Teisen Uddercream

Yes, udder cream; cream for udders. As the name suggests, it's designed to maintain good udder condition in dairy cows. Moisturising and often antiseptic, it's also a cheap alternative to chamois cream.

Chamois cream reduces friction between your skin and clothing, and so avoids chafing. It can be quite expensive, though — compared to udder cream, at least. Teisen Uddercream will set you back £21.98 for 2.5 litres.

If you don't want that much — and you probably don't — the same stuff is available in a 200ml tube for £3.90. Plus, there's a small chance that your milk yield will go through the roof.

Go for fig rolls rather than energy bars

A 55g PowerBar Energize energy bar contains 36g of carbs (21g of which are sugars), 2.6g of protein and 2.8g of fat. A bar will set you back around £1.50.

McVities Fig Rolls

The nutritional data for three McVitie's Fig Rolls is similar: 37.2g of carbs (18.9g of which are sugars), 2.4g of protein and 4.5g of fat. A whole 200g pack, containing 12 biscuits, currently costs £1.45 from Sainsbury's, so you're looking at about 36p for the equivalent of an energy bar. Bargain!

Use your phone as a GPS bike computer

A GPS bike computer on the handlebar makes a lot of sense for a lot of people but the smartphone that you're probably already carrying in your pocket has a huge navigational capability and will do a great job for some. Use an app that allows you to download and save maps when you have access to WiFi and you won't eat into your data allowance either.

Quad Lock Bike Kit for I Phone 7 - mounted top.jpg

You'll need a mount for your mobile – something like a Quad Lock Bike Kit — but that'll be cheaper than shelling out on a bike computer.

What if you don't want to stick your posh smartphone on the handlebar?

"An old, unwanted smartphone makes a perfectly functional bike computer. Bonus: stick your SIM card back in it and you have an emergency phone," says Tim Meyrick.

Clean your bike with wet wipes

"Cheap baby wipes are great for cleaning bar tape, saddles and any sticky residue on your bike," says Peter Atkin.

Water Wipes

Wipes that are labelled as bike or workshop-specific are available, but you can save a lot of money by heading down to your local supermarket and picking up a regular pack of wet wipes or baby wipes to use on everything from your chain to your fingers.

You'll still need to give your bike a regular clean and degrease, but the wet wipe solution is the equivalent of putting on an extra spray of deodorant rather than getting into the shower; it'll do for a while!

Of course, using a bucket and water is even cheaper, but this isn't always a practical solution.

Clean your chain with paraffin or white spirit

Paraffin makes a cheap chain degreaser (although some chain manufacturers will tell you never to remove the original factory lube).

Take the chain off your bike and soak it in a shallow dish of paraffin (some people use white spirit – including a number of the road.cc team). Give it a clean, perhaps with something like an old toothbrush, wipe it down, put it back on your bike and apply some lube.

Paraffin

Save the paraffin and you'll be able to use it again (it's a petroleum product so go careful; it's not nice stuff).

You can buy paraffin all over the place. £7.98 gets you four litres from B&Q.

Store your phone in a freezer bag

Most modern smartphones are waterproof but if you want to protect yours from getting scratched in your pocket you can use a a freezer bag/ snack bag instead of a brand name wallet.

Ziploc bags

A Ziploc Snack Bag, for instance, measures 16.5cm x 8.2cm so will fit perfectly into most jersey pockets, and it has a sealed top. Head over to Amazon and you can buy 90 of them for £7.69 or go to any supermarket and you'll find various options in different sizes, some more durable than others.

Make your own energy drink

A DIY energy drink is really easy to make and much cheaper than buying a ready-made sports drink.

One method is to add 500ml of orange juice to 500ml of water, add half a teaspoon of table salt and... that's it.

Tesco Orange Juice

This drink gives you 235kcal of energy and 52g of carbs.

A litre of orange juice is currently 55p at Tesco, but you only need half that so you're looking at 27.5p.

Use safety glasses

"Wear safety glasses instead of Oakleys," says Pete Watts.

Bolle Ness+

You can buy safety specs from any DIY store for £2 or £3. Bollé even makes some, like the Ness+, with a sporty look and a scratch and fog resistant coating. You can pick up a pair for £9.79.

Clean your disc brakes with propanol

Most commercial disc brake cleaners contain a form of the alcohol propanol. You can buy it on its own from somewhere like Amazon (five litres for £23.16) and use it to get oil and grease of your brakes.

Propanol is highly flammable and can cause serious eye irritation, so be ultra-careful.

Wear waterproof latex gloves

"Latex gloves work well under [outer] gloves in the rain," says Kris Pratt.

Latex gloves

Disposable latex gloves aren't breathable but they are waterproof, if that's your number one concern. They're also cheap. You can buy a pack of 100 for £6.27 at B&Q.

If you're sensitive to latex or want a more robust barrier against solvents, you can get nitrile gloves from about £6 for 100 from Amazon.

Wear freezer bags as waterproof socks

"Use freezer bags inside shoes instead of expensive waterproof outer socks," says Dominic Epsom.

Not everyone agrees.

"I've tried that and water trickles down the inevitable gaps in the top, unless you gaffer-tape the tops to your legs," says Jo Burt.

Like latex gloves (above), freezer bags obviously aren't breathable but the fact that they're waterproof might be more important to you on some rides. You can buy 40 for £1.50 at Tesco.

Tesco freezer bags

Some people also wrap a layer of aluminium foil around the outside of their socks to keep heat in on cold rides.

Stash your tools/spares in an old bottle

Water bottle as tool storage - 1

A tool holder bottle doesn't cost a whole lot but the chances are that you have an old bottle kicking about that'll do the job equally well.

There are two ways to do it: either use a wide necked bottle or you take a tall bottle, chop it in two and use the top half as a lid section.

Use a pencil case as a tool roll

"My tool roll fits an inner tube, multitool, two tyre levers, a CO2 pump and two canisters. It's a 50p pencil case from Tesco that fits in a jersey pocket," says Gareth Gaffer George.

Pencil case tool roll

Push the boat out and you can get this one (above) for three quid! Other bags will do a similar job, of course.

"Last year I got a Muc-Off wash bag for Christmas that I now use it as a tool bag in my panniers," says Wolf Simpson.

Drink chocolate milk for recovery

This one is well known. Sports scientists will tell you that a good recovery drink should have a carbohydrate: protein ratio of 3:1 or 4:1.

Frijj chocolate milk (1)

A 400ml bottle of Yazoo Chocolate Milk gives you 36.4g of carbs, 13.2g of protein and 260kcal of energy, while a 400ml bottle of Muller Frijj Chocolate Milkshake gives you 44g of carbs, 13.2g of protein and 300kcal of energy. They cost about £1 each from a supermarket.

These are very similar values to those of a recovery drink from a sports nutrition brand. You probably wouldn't want to survive on the stuff but chocolate milk does the job after a tough ride.

Quad Lock Bike Kit for I Phone 7 - mounted top.jpg

Mat has worked for loads of bike magazines over 20+ years, and been editor of 220 Triathlon and Cycling Plus. He's been road.cc technical editor for eight years, testing bikes, fettling the latest kit, and trying out the most up-to-the-minute clothing. We send him off around the world to get all the news from launches and shows too. He has won his category in Ironman UK 70.3 and finished on the podium in both marathons he has run. Mat is a Cambridge graduate who did a post-grad in magazine journalism, and he is a past winner of the Cycling Media Award for Specialist Online Writer.

32 comments

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hawkinspeter [3597 posts] 5 months ago
14 likes

Top Tips!

 

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Duncann [1491 posts] 5 months ago
2 likes

Good tips indeed, which can not only "save your arse" and "clean your chain" but also "save your chain" and "clean your arse".

I'd call that a win-win. Or a win-win, win-win. Or maybe a win-win-win-win-wipe. Or something.

Bit concerned that someone would pay £1.45 for 12 fig rolls though...

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julesselmes [10 posts] 5 months ago
1 like

<p>&nbsp;Two notes to add...<br />
For the glasses your older readers may want to consider these bifocal safety glasses. At last I can see more than just the largest digits on my phone- already using your Tip #3 ;)<br />
&nbsp;https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00W5SC2YW/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o05_s... />
The 1.5 magnification is perfect for the distance from head to bar mount and&nbsp; less than £10<br />
For the DIY energy drink: It is better to add Andrews Liver Salts (easily bought in any supermarket or Boot/Superdrug) than just table salt because it's not only calcium that your body needs. In fact did you get a doctor to check that amount of salt; seems very high for that quantity of liquid?</p>

<p>Can I suggest a more environmental and in my opinion a better working degreaser of commercial Heavy-Duty Citrus Degreaser. I buy a gallon (3.7L) for £11. Not as cheap as paraffin but better for the planet!<br />
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001B1AIM2/ref=od_aui_detailpages00?ie...

<p>&nbsp;</p>

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BehindTheBikesheds [3153 posts] 5 months ago
5 likes

Cut and doubled up inner tubes for bungee straps

No need to buy freezer bags to keep your feet dry when the bag from a loaf of bread will do, or if you're posh use the wax wrapping from a loaf of Warburtons, these also double as brilliant wrapping to keep your sandwhiches from drying out. Also can be re-used many times over and for other purposes such as wrapping up a lubed chain.

A pencil case bag that you then cram in one jersey pocket, really?? I can put a 12" mini MTB pump in my jersey back pocket and it's never fallen out despite half of it sticking out, along with inner tube, mini tool, levers, snack bars/sugared sweets, why bulk it out even more with a pencil case which could overstretch your jersey/concentrate weight in one pocket!

Wear safety glasses instead of Oakleys, yeah but you forgot to mention that you need to check to make sure they have the correct and certified UVA/UVB rating. Indoor work glasses are NOT always the same as those designed for outdoors. Poundland do cycling style sunglasses that are UVA/UVB rated BTW.

A 400ml bottle of yazoo has just 1% of cocoa in it, as well as 36g of sugar and also gum shite/preservatives, not really understanding your recommendation for crap like that over just normal milk which is 5x cheaper and contains same protein/sugar?

Avatar
don simon fbpe [2989 posts] 5 months ago
2 likes
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

Cut and doubled up inner tubes for bungee straps

No need to buy freezer bags to keep your feet dry when the bag from a loaf of bread will do, or if you're posh use the wax wrapping from a loaf of Warburtons, these also double as brilliant wrapping to keep your sandwhiches from drying out. Also can be re-used many times over and for other purposes such as wrapping up a lubed chain.

A pencil case bag that you then cram in one jersey pocket, really?? I can put a 12" mini MTB pump in my jersey back pocket and it's never fallen out despite half of it sticking out, along with inner tube, mini tool, levers, snack bars/sugared sweets, why bulk it out even more with a pencil case which could overstretch your jersey/concentrate weight in one pocket!

Wear safety glasses instead of Oakleys, yeah but you forgot to mention that you need to check to make sure they have the correct and certified UVA/UVB rating. Indoor work glasses are NOT always the same as those designed for outdoors. Poundland do cycling style sunglasses that are UVA/UVB rated BTW.

A 400ml bottle of yazoo has just 1% of cocoa in it, as well as 36g of sugar and also gum shite/preservatives, not really understanding your recommendation for crap like that over just normal milk which is 5x cheaper and contains same protein/sugar?

Would it be rude to point out that your first recommendation is to buy manufactured bread that is full of crap too? https://www.weightlossresources.co.uk/calories-in-food/bakery-products/w...

Who's eating bread as a part of a modern traing diet?

Nobody's perfect.

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Mybike [47 posts] 5 months ago
1 like

These are usefull articles. I used the same Zipp loc bag to keep my phone dry and also keep a tube co2 and lever in the same bag always eat real food vs power bars

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Pushing50 [186 posts] 5 months ago
6 likes

Just suggested to the wife that I would like to try out udder cream.

I got the most dispicable but inquisitive look. So I went on to explain that it is for maintaining good teat condition and that I would like to try to rub it on........

I cannot write the next part of the story for wont of upsetting people with the language that followed!

It may be cheaper than chamois cream but not worth the hassle of explanation, unless you are a dairy farmer.

 

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Pushing50 [186 posts] 5 months ago
0 likes

Instead of plasic bags over the feet (which I find way too sweaty) I have on occasion wrapped the toe of the shoe with clingfilm making sure that the sole sweat vent is wrapped over too, before putting on my overshoes. This has given an extra layer of waterproofness and warmth, but I only apply this for those cold, wet rides.

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Mungecrundle [1444 posts] 5 months ago
6 likes

I've always found that the best way to being a skinflint is to invest in decent kit and then look after it.

E.g Good quality tools will allow you to do your own maintenance, be less likely to damage the parts you are working on and will last for years, if not a lifetime. So why leave them to rust in a disorganised tool box when a quick wipe over with some machine oil and putting them away properly will keep them in good condition for very little extra effort?

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Stephan Matthiesen [73 posts] 5 months ago
4 likes

In cold weather, safety gloves are a very good alternative to more expensive gloves. They are about 1 or 2 pounds for a pair, but if you tend to mislay your gloves, you can get a box of 120 pairs for about 50 pounds. They come in various colours, hivis or not, and the latex palm gives a good grip. For cold winters, go for the ones that are for cold store/freezer work. These are nice and warm, but can be a bit stiff when new, so it's harder to bend the fingers.

On the baby wipes, be aware that many are not paper although they look like it, but some kind of paper-plastic mix that doesn't decay, so please only dispose off them in the landfill bin, not in the toilet (they cause many problems in waste water treatment) and definitely not in nature, just like you'd do with food wrappers etc. (but we are all very responsible here, are we not?).

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bendip [49 posts] 5 months ago
6 likes

don't ignore the cleaning staff at the office, say good morning, smile and offer them a coffee occasionally..you'd be amazed at the stuff Pat has let me have for the bike over the years..litres of pretty decent citrus degreaser..tubs of industrial wipes..boxes of latex gloves..all for a spoonful of gold blend....and 2 sweetex

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CygnusX1 [1144 posts] 5 months ago
12 likes

Wet wipes = single use plastics, and a recent study found they constituted 93% of the material in sewer blockages (fatbergs). 

If you must use them, don't flush them - put them in the bin.

https://inews.co.uk/news/environment/wet-wipes-environmental-hazard/

 

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CygnusX1 [1144 posts] 5 months ago
0 likes
Pushing50 wrote:

Instead of plasic bags over the feet (which I find way too sweaty) I have on occasion wrapped the toe of the shoe with clingfilm making sure that the sole sweat vent is wrapped over too, before putting on my overshoes. This has given an extra layer of waterproofness and warmth, but I only apply this for those cold, wet rides.

Has anyone tried verruca socks to help keep feet warm/dry?

I bought some Velotoze last year, only used once so far, but did think they were basically colourful verruca socks with cutouts for the cleats & heel. Not sure how well verruca socks would hold out if you tried cutting holes in them yourself though.

However (although I haven't tried it myself) it seems that wearing verruca socks inside your shoes rather than freezer bags / bread bags / clingfilm / aluminium foil might be a good option -- I've tried freezer bags and foil in the past and found them uncomfortable from the material bunching up, and in the case of the foil it disintegrated quickly.

Avatar
BehindTheBikesheds [3153 posts] 5 months ago
1 like
don simon fbpe wrote:
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

Cut and doubled up inner tubes for bungee straps

No need to buy freezer bags to keep your feet dry when the bag from a loaf of bread will do, or if you're posh use the wax wrapping from a loaf of Warburtons, these also double as brilliant wrapping to keep your sandwhiches from drying out. Also can be re-used many times over and for other purposes such as wrapping up a lubed chain.

A pencil case bag that you then cram in one jersey pocket, really?? I can put a 12" mini MTB pump in my jersey back pocket and it's never fallen out despite half of it sticking out, along with inner tube, mini tool, levers, snack bars/sugared sweets, why bulk it out even more with a pencil case which could overstretch your jersey/concentrate weight in one pocket!

Wear safety glasses instead of Oakleys, yeah but you forgot to mention that you need to check to make sure they have the correct and certified UVA/UVB rating. Indoor work glasses are NOT always the same as those designed for outdoors. Poundland do cycling style sunglasses that are UVA/UVB rated BTW.

A 400ml bottle of yazoo has just 1% of cocoa in it, as well as 36g of sugar and also gum shite/preservatives, not really understanding your recommendation for crap like that over just normal milk which is 5x cheaper and contains same protein/sugar?

Would it be rude to point out that your first recommendation is to buy manufactured bread that is full of crap too? https://www.weightlossresources.co.uk/calories-in-food/bakery-products/w...

Who's eating bread as a part of a modern traing diet?

Nobody's perfect.

Who recommended buying the manufactured bread, I didn't? I picked up a tesco bag off the floor yesterday, i then used it for something else, I bought nothing!

I simply pointed out the flaw in suggesting specially manufactured products such as freezer bags instead of a waste/by product from other goods - not limited to a loaf of bread, you could use a plastic bag from any relatively large product to keep your feet dry/warmer. Also highlighting the promotion of a product that is five times the cost of another that has no advantage nutrition wise and also has ingredients that you don't really want to consume.

That you can't differentiate between my suggestions and the two issues I pointed out about road cc suggestions reflects your lack of understanding, they're not remotely comparable. in terms of flaws/wrong thinking.

Avatar
BehindTheBikesheds [3153 posts] 5 months ago
2 likes
CygnusX1 wrote:

Wet wipes = single use plastics, and a recent study found they constituted 93% of the material in sewer blockages (fatbergs). 

If you must use them, don't flush them - put them in the bin.

https://inews.co.uk/news/environment/wet-wipes-environmental-hazard/

 

You can compost the grimiest, the fungus and other stuff in there should break them down, you could also dry out relatively clean ones and use them to help drainage/moisture retention for plants in the summer.

There's a lot of stuff we as cyclists could reuse/not throw away so readily, I made some keyrings out of an old chain one year. also made a bike lock from a chain and old inner tubes.

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don simon fbpe [2989 posts] 5 months ago
4 likes

Apparently it was rude.

EDIT:

That you can't differentiate between a question and a statement, yadda, yadda, yadda!

Merry Christmas you miserable fucker!  yes

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CygnusX1 [1144 posts] 5 months ago
3 likes
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

There's a lot of stuff we as cyclists could reuse/not throw away so readily, I made some keyrings out of an old chain one year. also made a bike lock from a chain and old inner tubes.

Not convinced of the security offered by a device that can be defeated by a multi tool with a chain breaker.

Avatar
madcarew [1002 posts] 5 months ago
4 likes
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:
CygnusX1 wrote:

Wet wipes = single use plastics, and a recent study found they constituted 93% of the material in sewer blockages (fatbergs). 

If you must use them, don't flush them - put them in the bin.

https://inews.co.uk/news/environment/wet-wipes-environmental-hazard/

 

You can compost the grimiest, the fungus and other stuff in there should break them down, you could also dry out relatively clean ones and use them to help drainage/moisture retention for plants in the summer.

There's a lot of stuff we as cyclists could reuse/not throw away so readily, I made some keyrings out of an old chain one year. also made a bike lock from a chain and old inner tubes.

Wet wipes don't compost. Not even 'flushable' ones. Come back to your compost in  a year's time and they will still be there. 

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matthewn5 [1337 posts] 5 months ago
0 likes

Got a lovely tool bag for £3 off Ebay, that fits a jersey pocket and keeps everything neat and tidy:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/First-Aid-GREEN-Empty-Bag-400-Series-Bag-Medi...

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Jack Osbourne snr [780 posts] 5 months ago
2 likes

I was brought up riding on Jelly babies and a bottle of plain water, and thats not changed much in over 30 years on the road.

About 10 years ago, I fairly regularly went riding with a work colleague who was quite happy shelling out all sorts money on stuff like honey stingers, shot bloks etc etc. One day as we were having a scenery break, I compared the stuff he had to the bag of Tangfastics in my jersey pocket... Tangfastics had an almost identical, if not slightly better, nutritional makeup.

My concession to modern nutritional science is hydration tabs - I am a big fan of the High 5 Zero tabs

Avatar
ClubSmed [781 posts] 5 months ago
2 likes
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:
don simon fbpe wrote:
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

Cut and doubled up inner tubes for bungee straps

No need to buy freezer bags to keep your feet dry when the bag from a loaf of bread will do, or if you're posh use the wax wrapping from a loaf of Warburtons, these also double as brilliant wrapping to keep your sandwhiches from drying out. Also can be re-used many times over and for other purposes such as wrapping up a lubed chain.

A pencil case bag that you then cram in one jersey pocket, really?? I can put a 12" mini MTB pump in my jersey back pocket and it's never fallen out despite half of it sticking out, along with inner tube, mini tool, levers, snack bars/sugared sweets, why bulk it out even more with a pencil case which could overstretch your jersey/concentrate weight in one pocket!

Wear safety glasses instead of Oakleys, yeah but you forgot to mention that you need to check to make sure they have the correct and certified UVA/UVB rating. Indoor work glasses are NOT always the same as those designed for outdoors. Poundland do cycling style sunglasses that are UVA/UVB rated BTW.

A 400ml bottle of yazoo has just 1% of cocoa in it, as well as 36g of sugar and also gum shite/preservatives, not really understanding your recommendation for crap like that over just normal milk which is 5x cheaper and contains same protein/sugar?

Would it be rude to point out that your first recommendation is to buy manufactured bread that is full of crap too? https://www.weightlossresources.co.uk/calories-in-food/bakery-products/w...

Who's eating bread as a part of a modern traing diet?

Nobody's perfect.

Who recommended buying the manufactured bread, I didn't? I picked up a tesco bag off the floor yesterday, i then used it for something else, I bought nothing!

I simply pointed out the flaw in suggesting specially manufactured products such as freezer bags instead of a waste/by product from other goods - not limited to a loaf of bread, you could use a plastic bag from any relatively large product to keep your feet dry/warmer. Also highlighting the promotion of a product that is five times the cost of another that has no advantage nutrition wise and also has ingredients that you don't really want to consume.

That you can't differentiate between my suggestions and the two issues I pointed out about road cc suggestions reflects your lack of understanding, they're not remotely comparable. in terms of flaws/wrong thinking.

I would suggest that the line "if you're posh use the wax wrapping from a loaf of Warburtons" would suggest the purchasing of said bread product. I doubt that anyone would assume that "if you're posh.." would mean being choosier over your choice of other peoples trash recycling, it is more likely to be the opening to what can be afforded.

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Kendalred [338 posts] 5 months ago
2 likes

I would suggest that if you are smearing udder cream on your undercarriage energetically, and your milk yield is up...then it's probably not milk.

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Woldsman [311 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes

Save yourself something like the price of a pint by making your own chain hook from a wire coat hanger or BBQ skewer  1

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srchar [1351 posts] 3 months ago
2 likes

Water Wipes?! They're too expensive for the baby, never mind the bike.

Aldi baby wipes FTW.

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LastBoyScout [591 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes

In general principle, I disagree with the zip-loc bag - they don't tend to last that long and can be a bit too slippery in the pocket. I'd rather pay a bit more for something more robust that I can also use for other things.

I used to use an Aquapac bag for my old phone, which was perfect, but a forced change of phone means the new one is too big to roll the top down to properly seal it. I'm reluctantly back to the zip-loc bag until they bring out a bigger size.

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dave_t [30 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes

There's a another way to use a water bottlle as a tool bottle. Instead of cutting it in half height wise, cut it length wise and across the base, to created a hinged 'clam shell' container similar to the zipped tool bottle containers you can buy. Put your tools (or in my case emergency waterproof) in a plastic bag inside the 'clam shell' and close it up, screwing the lid on to hold it all together. When you put it in the bottle holder put the cut at the back towards the frame and no-one will be any the wiser. It also allows you to grab a bit more space in the bottle than the other method.

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ktache [1568 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes

Make your own flapjacks and brownies.  Quality ingredients, and a bit of practice and an amount of tweaking, you can get the perfect high energy snack, better than anything you can buy and at a fraction of the price.

And jelly babies.

And the bananaguard.

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kevvjj [464 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes

That paraffin can be put to another use for those of you who use paraffin wax for your chain. Simplay add about 30% paraffin by volume to your wax and the finished, dried product will be more flexible with less flaking - lasts even longer on the chain.

Avatar
biker phil [51 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes
LastBoyScout wrote:

In general principle, I disagree with the zip-loc bag - they don't tend to last that long and can be a bit too slippery in the pocket. I'd rather pay a bit more for something more robust that I can also use for other things.

I used to use an Aquapac bag for my old phone, which was perfect, but a forced change of phone means the new one is too big to roll the top down to properly seal it. I'm reluctantly back to the zip-loc bag until they bring out a bigger size.

I can't recommend Noaks bags highly enough. Cheap, and last almost forever.

Avatar
DoctorFish [200 posts] 3 weeks ago
1 like

There is quite a lot of single use plastic in this article.

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