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All the things you need to know so your rear (visibility) is covered

If you're after a front light, we've got you nicely covered. But what about a red one for the rear of your bike? Don't worry, we're all over that too!

Get yourself seen

A rear light has the proverbial one job: to get you seen, unlike a front light that has to be visible enough to stop inattentive drivers mowing you down while allowing you to see where you're going. Depending on where and how you ride, your priorities regarding brightness, flashing modes and battery life will be different.

Night rider.JPG

The Road Vehicle Lighting Regulations say:

Rear lamp
One is required, to show a red light, positioned centrally or offside, between 350mm and 1500mm from the ground, at or near the rear, aligned towards, and visible from, behind. If capable of emitting a steady light, it must be marked as conforming to BS3648, or BS6102/3, or an equivalent EC standard. If capable of emitting only a flashing light, it must emit at least 4 candela... the light shown by the lamp when flashing shall be displayed not less than 60 nor more than 240 equal times per minute and the intervals between each display of light shall be constant.

Given that every light we know of has a steady mode, that means you need a British Standard-approved light to comply with the law. To be fully compliant with the law your bike also needs a front light, front and rear reflectors, and amber pedal reflectors.

In practice, not many bike lights are Kitemarked. The specification for cycle lights dates back to 1986 and is written mostly with filament bulbs in mind; every single light we've been sent for the last few years is an LED. LED lights can meet the requirements but lots of them aren't specifically tested for the ageing British Standard, especially those that are sold worldwide.

Since the Road Vehicles Lighting Regulations (RVLR) was amended to allow cyclists to fit flashing LEDs, we've heard very little about cyclists being stopped for having non-compliant lights. In theory running a non-approved light could be used as an argument for contributory negligence in the case of an accident, though we've not heard of such a case being brought as yet.

Things to consider

RSP Spectre R rear light

What kind of riding will I be doing?
If you're mostly just pootling to the shops and back then something basic will probably do the job. Simple flashers that use button cells or AAA batteries are cheap and effective these days, and they last ages before the battery needs replacing.

Niterider Solas

If your commute is on busier roads, or you plan to do longer rides at night, you'll probably want something brighter. There's a wealth of USB-rechargeable and brighter AAA-powered rear lights about that will catch a driver's attention from further afield. Many riders who spend a lot of time on the road after dark fit more than one rear light to increase their chances of being seen.

Electron R100 rear light

Some rear lights are bright enough to be used in daylight too. There's certain types of riding – racing a time trial on a fast A-road, for example – where you'd want to be running the brightest rear light you can buy. Plenty of city riders run their rear lights in daytime hours too.

Flashing or not?
In terms of the law, it's up to you. The law requires flashing modes to be between 1Hz and 4Hz (one to four flashes per second); as you'll see from the beam comparison engine below, actual modes vary considerably and some fall well outside that. Pulsing constant modes are a grey area.

Ask a rider why they have their light flashing and they'll often argue that it makes them visible from further away. Ask another rider why they have a constant light and you'll often hear that it makes distance easier to judge for following vehicles.

There's not a lot of scientific research to hang your choice on. Most people who run two lights will have one of them flashing. One thing to bear in mind is that if you're riding in a close group – be that a club run, sportive, Audax or anything else – having a bright light flashing in your eyes at close range is pretty annoying. Many lights have low-power steady modes for group riding.

All-round visibility
Most rear lights are nice and bright if you're standing directly behind them. But in many situations – and especially for urban riding – traffic may be approaching you from other directions, so it's good for a light to have a wide angle of visibility. Again, the type of riding you do will dictate how important side visibility is to you.

Battery life
Most rear lights will cope easily with the longest ride you're likely to throw at them, though not all USB-rechargeable ones can be fully trusted to last a whole night, especially on steady beam. If you're planning some big forays into the dark unknown – or if you're just a bit crap at remembering to charge your lights – pick something that has a long run time. AAA-powered lights tend to be the pick for that.

Recommended lights

Exposure TraceR MK2 With ReAKT And Peloton — £58.50

Exposure TraceR Reakt rear light.jpg

Exposure's TraceR with ReAKT and Peloton rear light impressed us previously without the Peloton technology, but one year on it's gained this extra feature to help keep it near the top of the pile.

In this updated version, the recipe hasn't changed, it's just been added to. You still get a beaming 75-lumen max output, with six modes that dictate how much burn time you have, from 3 hours in the brightest static mode to 24 hours on the lowest flash mode, plus DayBright pulse mode.

ReAKT is probably the best feature of the lot, adapting to the light conditions at the time, and flaring up when it senses that the rider is braking. But now there's a new feature to add to the mix. It's called Peloton, and it recognises when there is a front bike light behind you and dims itself to save dazzling the following rider.

Oxford Ultratorch Slimline R50 — £14.95

Oxford Ultratorch Slimline R50 Rear LED

Oxford's Ultratorch Slimline R50 rear light is a simple rear light that does the job of making sure you're well seen, with ample light output, good mode choices, and easy operation and fitting, in a conveniently sized package at a very good price. The R50's COB LED can put out an adequate 50 lumens in its high mode, with medium, low and eco modes available too. You cycle through these with a single click of the power button, and switch them off with a long press. You get 2hrs claimed burn time (mine tapped out at 1:52hrs) on the brightest static setting, and near-enough 6hrs if you have it on the highest flash setting.

Read our review of the Oxford Ultratorch Slimline R50
Find an Oxford Products dealer

Blackburn DayBlazer 65 — £19.99

Blackburn Day Blazer 65 Rear

If you want a small, well-made, easy-fitting rear light for your bike or bag that's bright and good value, look no further than the Blackburn DayBlazer 65. Its two LEDs pump out an impressive 65 lumens when in the disruptive 'high flash' mode, and 50 and 30 respectively in 'steady' and 'low strobe' settings. Burn times are claimed to be 1:30-6:00hrs depending on the mode, and we found those to be accurate to within around 5-10 minutes depending on how you use it. The single button doubles as an indicator of battery life when the unit has just been switched off, and the light naturally powers down a little when you get close to the end of its life.

Read our review of the Blackburn DayBlazer 65
Find a Blackburn dealer

Lezyne Zecto Drive Max — £38.39

Lezyne Zecto Drive Max rear light.jpg

The Lezyne Zecto Drive Max 250 has a range of modes that start at sensible light output and increase to the ever so slightly insane with a mighty 250 lumens topping the bill. Each one has its use though and allows you to balance power with battery life whatever the conditions.

Lots of manufacturers are starting to include daytime modes to their lights and this is what Lezyne have done with the Max 250. The 250-lumen flash can be seen a good distance even in bright sunshine and for this reason I'd suggest never using it in the dark as it is downright antisocial for drivers sat behind.

Read our review of the Lezyne Zecto Drive Max
Find a Lezyne dealer

Moon Alcor — £10.99

Moon Alcor.jpg

The Moon Alcor is simple, bright and has a nifty magnetic mount. I use a back light almost all the time, perhaps excepting on the finest of high summer days. Bright sunlight, especially when the sun is low and the roads are wet, is not the friend of the cyclist and an attention-grabbing strobe like that provided by the Moon Alcor is a valuable aid to daytime visibility.

That's how I've used this most of the time during the test period, and it was a bonus that the day-flash mode gives over 34 hours of battery life (I never did find out exactly how many hours because I had to go to bed). Moon reckons that on the low-power single-flash setting you should get 70 hours. That's still plenty bright enough for night riding on dark roads, by the way.

Read our review of the Moon Alcor
Find a Moon dealer

Oxford Ultratorch Pro R25 — £19.99

Oxford Ultratorch Pro R25 LED Tail light.jpg

The Oxford Ultratorch Pro R25 LED Tail Light is a strip rear light that performs the basics very well at a competitive price.

What do we want from a rear light? For me, there are only a few central criteria that it needs to fulfil to hit the spot: it needs to be bright, make you clearly visible, and fit securely to the rear of the bike. Next comes battery life – something easily taken care of usually, thanks to the lower power requirement of a tail light compared to a front beam – profile on the bike, and waterproofness.

The Ultratorch meets pretty much all these criteria. A single button atop the unit operates the light, in which you can cycle through four different settings with a single click – three static brightness settings of 25, 50 and 100 per cent of the 25-lumen maximum output, and a 12-lumen flash setting from the Cree LEDs.

Read our review of the Oxford Ultratorch Pro R25
Find an Oxford Products dealer

Bontrager Flare R City — £21

Bontrager Flare R City Tail Light.jpg

The Bontrager Flare R City rear light is a small yet mighty cube-shaped model bristling with sensors and similar tech to deliver optimum light intelligently, whatever the conditions, day, or night.

The tail light has a 100-lumen front sibling, and together they could be all some urban commuters will need. At 26g apiece, they're arguably ideal clutter-free options for summer/time trial builds, or companions for a trainer/audax bike's main lighting.

Read our review of the Bontrager Flare R City
Find a Bontrager dealer

Brightside — £22,50

Brightside - Bright, amber and sideways light.jpg

Brightside's eponymous light is a well-built double-ended side light at a good price that attaches easily to your frame, and gives you an extra dimension of visibility to other road users approaching you from the side. Bright 15-lumen Cree LEDs at each end attract attention.

The Brightside has filled a gap in the market (a quick internet search only unearthed the Brightside and the Cateye Orbit Spoke lightset) in a bid to reduce the instances of SMIDSY (sorry mate I didn't see you) incidents. With too many accidents happening at junctions and roundabouts, the light is designed to give you all-round visibility to motorists approaching from your side – Brightside, not broadside.

Read our review of the Brightside

Cateye TL-LD610 — £15.99

Cateye TL-LD610

A classic that's still going strong, the TL-LD610 has five decently bright LEDs and runs off a pair of AAA batteries. It excels as a round-town attention-grabber because of the mode in which the lit LED scans across the panel: think Knight Rider or Cylon Centurion.

Find a Cateye dealer

Moon Gemini — £12.81

Moon Gemini rear light.jpg

Moon's Gemini is a featherweight USB rechargeable rear light that clips on easily and is bright enough for urban commuting. The small single button is surprisingly easy to find in big gloves.

The Gemini benefits from many of the features of its more expensive big brothers. It has a spot angle of 95 degrees at 10 metres, giving an effective span of 22m. The total angle is helped by the two single LEDs, resulting in a full 360 degrees, very useful for urban riding. The brightest 20-lumen constant is also perfect for partially lit commutes; I prefer a slightly brighter rear for my unlit rides, but this also works well here as a backup or secondary light.

Read our review of the Moon Gemini
Find a Moon dealer

Nite Rider Sentinel 150 — £42.99

Niterider Sentinel USB rear light

Dr Evil would love it. As well as powerful two-watt LED, the Sentinel shows riders how much space you'd like them to leave when they pass by drawing a virtual bike lane on the road with frickin' laser beams. Shark not included.

Read our review of the Niterider Sentinel

Knog Blinder Mob Kid Grid — £30.99

Knog Blinder Mob Kid Grid Rear Light.jpg

The Knog Blinder Mob Kid Grid Rear Light is a well designed and strong performing rear light. It pumps out enough light to keep you visible and has a really good variety of placement options while also having a good battery life, so it can just be left for weeks until it needs charging.

The light pumps out 44 lumens to keep you well lit without blinding the person riding/driving behind you. In recent years I have come to realise that being stuck behind somebody pumping out 100 lumens from their seatpost is one of my real pet peeves. Sure you can be seen mate, but the only other things I can see are blue dots. I'd say 44 lumens is about the right balance between good visibility and annoying the person behind you.

Read our review of the Knog Blinder Mob Kid Grid
Find a Knog dealer

Exposure Lights TraceR DayBright — £34

Exposure TraceR rear light

This super-bright and tough little USB rear light from UK illuminati Exposure pumps out plenty of light and will last for a week's medium-distance commuting (4-5 miles) between charges. It's not cheap, but it is excellent.

We've also been really impressed with the £59.96 Exposure TraceR Mk2; its ReAKT feature adjusts the brightness of the light based on braking forces and light conditions.

If you want more light and longer run time, the Exposure Blaze MK2 Reakt (£84.95) packs a 1,500mAh battery for roughly twice the life.

Read our review of the Exposure Lights TraceR DayBright
Find an Exposure lights dealer

Gemini Iris — £37.50

gemini-iris-rear-light_0.jpg

Gemini's Iris rear light claims to pump out a retina-melting 180 lumens of red. That's enough to get you seen in any conditions, and there are plenty of lower-power modes for general riding too. And it's well made.

First things first: ye gods, this thing is bright. You know when you turn a light on, and you think, "MY EYES!"? Well I did that with the Iris, only to find out it wasn't even on the brightest setting.

Read our review of the Gemini Iris rear light
Find a Gemini dealer

Magicshine MJ-818 — £49.90

Magicshine MJ 818 rear light

This is the standalone version of the MJ-818 which uses a 3-watt LED for maximum visibility with nine smaller emitters to cover a wide range of angles. In this package it's paired with a 8.4V 4.4Ah battery. If you already have a Magicshine light, then you can get the light and a cable splitter for £31.94

Read our review of the Magicshine MJ-818

See.Sense Icon 2 — £79.99

See.Sense_Icon_3.JPG

We loved the clever speed-sensing function and incredible brightness of the original See.Sense light. The Icon includes a plethora of extra features linked to a free app so you can control the light on your smartphone. This nifty little blazer will also tell your loved ones if you have a crash, and alert you if someone tries to make off with your bike when it's parked up.

The Icon uses super-bright Cree LEDs putting out a total of 300, which certainly count as bright enough for the old joke 'do not look at laser with remaining eye'. This is not a light to turn on while looking at it – it is ferociously bright.

Read our review of the See.Sense Icon

Lupine Rotlicht Max — ~£95

Lupine Rotlicht rear light

Another light with value-added smart functions, the Rotlicht acts as a brake light, brightening when you decelerate, and has a light sensor so it can adjust its output to the conditions. Clever stuff.

The latest version, the Rotlicht Max, has twice the run-time of the original Rotlicht.

Read our review of the Lupine Rotlicht

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59 comments

Avatar
drosco [428 posts] 2 years ago
1 like

I find the humble smart r1 takes some beating. Super bright and with some decent rechargeable batteries, will run for ages.

Avatar
WashoutWheeler [124 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes
waldner71]</p>

<p>[quote=gunswick

wrote:

Missed one brilliant rear, Bontrager Flare Type R (not the doofy city crappy one in the article) £45 and 60 lumens, people pass me widely in both daytime and nighttime modes. Supported by a Cateye rapid x pulsing (35lumens) on the seat stays.

 

I have a Bontrager Flare R too, excellent rear light, probably the best in terms of power, battery life, size, ease of use. Can be had for £36

http://www.cyclingweekly.com/reviews/lights-reflectives/bontrager-flare-...

 

[/quote Me to I replaced my failed TraceR with a Flare R so far so good.

Avatar
WashoutWheeler [124 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

I bought my TraceR from Evans in a bundle with the Trace front light. They were brilliant for 11 weeks then the fiddly USB connection broke on the front light and it developed a alarming rattle two days later the rear developed an alarming internal rattle. They were never dropped or recived any rough treatment they just started rattling. 

Took them back Evans for exchange only to be told by a manager "we no longer stock them", when I asked why?  said manager said "why do you think"?

 

When they worked they were my perfect lights light & very powerful especialy the Rear with its always on with pulse setting BRILLIANT!

BUT that fiddly USB connection is a real black mark, I never rode them in the rain so dont know how well the rubber band seal keeps water out of the USB port, BUT  build quality on my pair was highly  suspect. A real shame as I like to buy British when I can. I replaced them with a Lezyne Microdrive 500xl and a Bontrager Flare R both of which seem to be stout performers so far. 

Avatar
Bontie [28 posts] 2 years ago
1 like
WashoutWheeler wrote:

 

Took them back Evans for exchange only to be told by a manager "we no longer stock them", when I asked why?  said manager said "why do you think"?

 

Contact Exposure directly.

Avatar
Mystery Machine [54 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

If anyone is looking for a really good rear light to attach to the back of a helmet, then I can recommend this rechargeable one from Evans for £15:

https://www.evanscycles.com/fwe-rechargeable-rear-light-15-lumen-EV244786

It's very light-weight, but really bright, and lasts for absolutely ages (certainly an all day ride, unlike some - e.g. the LeZyne Zecto, which will barely do 5 hours on flashing - and I can usually get a week's worth of commuting out of it).

It comes with several fitting options, including a bracket for a seat post, but zip ties through the vents work best for helmet use.

You can also get it as a set with the front light, which works really well on Bromptons. But the rear light is the winner - I ended getting extra ones for family members because I was so impressed.

It's even easy to turn on while you're riding and wearing it on the helmet. It really is an excellent bit of kit. Also no issues with water ingress or charging to date in a couple of years' use.

 

 

Avatar
biketime [37 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes

I love my Blackburn Flea (front and back). Bright but not blinding. Charge on included USB port. No batteries so it's lighter.  About USD 30. 

Avatar
bikes [6 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes
tendecimalplaces wrote:

What this article doesn't comment on and no other reviews I've ever read has commented on is, in my experience, the most common design problem with rear lights. That is water entry leading to corrosion of battery contacts, out right failure or, very commonly, switch failure. I've long lost count of the number of lights from numerous brands that have ended up in the bucket because of this. The only light I have found that hasn't succumbed to this in over a year of riding in all weathers is the Exposure Redeye. This piggy backs off the front light so has no switch and no need for openings for batteries. If anyone can recommend any other lights whose design makes them fit for use by anyone other than fair weather cyclists, I'd love to try them. (and before you say it, I ride muguards in the winter but not in the summer).

 

After having to repair a light with sellotape, I realized I may as well tape over the joints/buttons of all of my lights. The tape lasts for a surprising amount of time.

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hirsute [1168 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes

Thought a cateye X3 would be on the list. Charges via usb.

Avatar
bikeandy61 [554 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes

I run an ortlieb saddle bag/wedge on my bike. This means that a seat post mounted light is only visible at a distance. As you approach me the bag obscures the lamp.

Anyone recommend a tail light that mounts from the saddle/rails so it sits above the bag? I know that there is an optional bracket for the Exposure Tracer, just a little pricey for my current finances though I may bite the bullet if I can't find an alternative.

Ta

Avatar
HoarseMann [307 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes
WashoutWheeler wrote:

I bought my TraceR from Evans in a bundle with the Trace front light. They were brilliant for 11 weeks then the fiddly USB connection broke on the front light and it developed a alarming rattle two days later the rear developed an alarming internal rattle. They were never dropped or recived any rough treatment they just started rattling. 

Took them back Evans for exchange only to be told by a manager "we no longer stock them", when I asked why?  said manager said "why do you think"?

 

When they worked they were my perfect lights light & very powerful especialy the Rear with its always on with pulse setting BRILLIANT!

BUT that fiddly USB connection is a real black mark, I never rode them in the rain so dont know how well the rubber band seal keeps water out of the USB port, BUT  build quality on my pair was highly  suspect. A real shame as I like to buy British when I can. I replaced them with a Lezyne Microdrive 500xl and a Bontrager Flare R both of which seem to be stout performers so far. 

I think you must have been very unlucky there. My experience with Exposure lights has been nothing but brilliant. Been totally dependable and lasted years. Evans still stock them too, but it’s the mk2 traceR now.

Avatar
dassie [290 posts] 9 months ago
0 likes
bikeandy61 wrote:

I run an ortlieb saddle bag/wedge on my bike. This means that a seat post mounted light is only visible at a distance. As you approach me the bag obscures the lamp.

Anyone recommend a tail light that mounts from the saddle/rails so it sits above the bag? I know that there is an optional bracket for the Exposure Tracer, just a little pricey for my current finances though I may bite the bullet if I can't find an alternative.

Ta

 

Most of the featured lights do seem to require oceans of clear seatpost, and with brackets that don't look suitable for seatstay attachment.  The Smart Lunar R1 (discontinued it seems), or the newer 1W Smart superflash with a very decent seatstay mount is worth a look.  Inexpensive enough to run two - one fixed and one on flash.

Avatar
StuInNorway [326 posts] 4 months ago
1 like
embattle wrote:

Is there a guide for how to position lights as it's now getting darker earlier and I'm more and more surprised just how badly people locate them, this morning a guy with a bike Pannier rack seemed to believe I and others would be able to see through the rack and the bag he had put on the rack.

I was looking through the list of recommended lights and ALL were seat post mounts, meaning anything on a luggage rack, or a slightly longer jacket will obscure them.
Due to how my bike is used, I run a saddle bag under the seat and a luggag rack, meaning any seat post mount light is about as useful as a chocolate teapot on a summers day. I had to make my own mount for a magicshine rear light with a 20mm dowel mounted to extend out the side of my rack. 
Add in that sometimes I need to run with panniers, this could also be a problem. 
I found a luggage rack mount one that's a reflector/light but in a Norwegian winter when it's often dark and wet, I prefer a 2nd light too.  Seems that Clasohlson's UK arm doesn't stock it, although if enough people asked they probably could. https://www.clasohlson.com/no/Asaklitt-LED-sykkellys/31-1927

 

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antigee [565 posts] 4 months ago
0 likes

100% agree Stuiln  I'm short and keep my tools in a saddle bag and run a bike with panniers - light choice for other than seatpost mount is terrible - ended up with a Moon Shield X has a rack mount but comes separate and a clip mount that I use on my topeak tool bag (far enough back not to get covered by jacket)  or sometimes  thru cable ties on helmet as a second light

https://www.moon-sports.com/product-page/shield-x-auto

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yupiteru [85 posts] 4 months ago
0 likes

For a number of years now have had a Magicshine mj-818 with the battery in a seat pack and a Cateye TL-LD610 on the seat post, the Magicshine is on in the day (85 lumens), easily very visible even in the brightest sunlight and both on at night, makes me very visible from quite a distance.

Avatar
BehindTheBikesheds [3322 posts] 4 months ago
2 likes

cyclists should never have lights on during the day, not only is it not effective (DRLs have been proven not to work) but it continues to pander to the vulnerable road users having to modify their behaviour. It's not helping you and it's not helping me and everyone else either!

If you can't see a 4 candela light and be able to avoid the user/not nduce fear of harm, then you've no business being on the road other than as a pedestrian.

Avatar
hirsute [1168 posts] 4 months ago
3 likes
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

cyclists should never have lights on during the day, not only is it not effective (DRLs have been proven not to work) but it continues to pander to the vulnerable road users having to modify their behaviour. It's not helping you and it's not helping me and everyone else either!

If you can't see a 4 candela light and be able to avoid the user/not nduce fear of harm, then you've no business being on the road other than as a pedestrian.

I suppose a rear light is handy if the sun is low and bright.

But we live in a bizarre world where a driver does not seem to have to slow down in such conditions and the vulnerable user is expected to make an adjustment.

Avatar
stonojnr [44 posts] 4 months ago
2 likes
hirsute wrote:
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

cyclists should never have lights on during the day, not only is it not effective (DRLs have been proven not to work) but it continues to pander to the vulnerable road users having to modify their behaviour. It's not helping you and it's not helping me and everyone else either!

If you can't see a 4 candela light and be able to avoid the user/not nduce fear of harm, then you've no business being on the road other than as a pedestrian.

I suppose a rear light is handy if the sun is low and bright.

But we live in a bizarre world where a driver does not seem to have to slow down in such conditions and the vulnerable user is expected to make an adjustment.

absolutely and I totally agree we shouldnt have to run daylight lights at all, but Ive been running a rear light this past week as almost an experiment in driver behaviour, and Ive not been close passed at all whilst running a rear light in daylight, whereas the previous week without it it was multiple close passes on the same road, same traffic conditions. I dont have an answer as to why people do that

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Sriracha [321 posts] 1 month ago
3 likes

"To be fully compliant with the law your bike also needs a front light, front and rear reflectors, and amber pedal reflectors."
Not according to this:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pedal-cycles-lighting/pedal-c...

Any cycle which is used between sunset and sunrise must be fitted with the following:
white front light
red rear light
red rear reflector
amber/yellow pedal reflectors – front and rear on each pedal.

No mention of a front reflector.

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LastBoyScout [647 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

I've been a big fan of these for a couple of years:

https://www.halfords.com/cycling/bike-parts/mudguards/topeak-defender-ig...

Slightly fiddly to fit and not without a few niggles, fragility of the light units being the main one, but seriously visible, as the light strips are so long.

They just need Topeak to bring out a mk2 version that would work with moden bikes running disk brakes (clips on the back rim brake for support) and wider tyres and 23mm.

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grumpyoldcyclist [184 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes
fraew wrote:

Best and brightest rear light i've ever encountered:

https://www.aliexpress.com/item/100-Lumens-Rechargeable-COB-LED-USB-Moun...

Its US$6.30, USB rechargable, and 100 Lumens is an under-estimate. So seriously bright I ended up buying half a dozen of them... and they haven't failed me yet.

I rate these too, bought two but the original hasn't failed yet so have a 'spare' ready. I use the flash mode and never run it on constant max as it is very bright. Teamed up with a Lezyne in constant low mode and a small £2.50 light hanging off my rucksack.

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jaysa [158 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

cyclists should never have lights on during the day, not only is it not effective (DRLs have been proven not to work) but it continues to pander to the vulnerable road users having to modify their behaviour. It's not helping you and it's not helping me and everyone else either!

Interesting viewpoint.

Around London, I run front and rear flashies during the day, and feel that they help other road users realise there is a cyclist, and, one hopes, behave accordingly!

Drivers are sometimes distracted and look poorly before turning, so anything I can do to be spotted is on my list - fluo helmet and bright top etc. Sorry if this offends you.

I've also taken to running a solid front light while descending in the Alps and you can clearly see for example oncoming motorbikes deciding not to overtake cars. Drivers often wear sunnies, so again it helps make me a bit more visible.

With you on DRLs though - bloody Citroens and others are so bright I can't look at them in the day time, which means I might not see cyclist or pedestrians behind them.

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ktache [2215 posts] 1 month ago
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BtBS hasn't been around for a while.

The helmet discussions have been sort of mild.

I have just got myself an Exposure RedEye helmet.  it piggybacks off my helmet mounted Axis.  It's good and bright, I shall use it soon now it is getting dark so much earlier.  Could have been the last one, Exposure don't seem to be making them anymore, just the seatpost ones with the long wires.

I did get me a Micro RedEye at one point, but it didn't last long, I'm guessing it was never going to, luckily it was fairly cheap.

At some point (soon) I will make a lanyard to make sure I don't lose the RedEye. 

And I want to get a Moon Nebula for my seatstay, new bike and the old and falling to bits FibreFlare just doen't cut it so much.  It's done very well though, no signs of water ingress.  The helmet version has been quite good too.  Nice concept.

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StraelGuy [1746 posts] 1 month ago
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ktache wrote:

BtBS hasn't been around for a while.

 

Just as well perhaps...

 

'By 'eck, yer don't need none o'them fancy expensive rear lights! When I were a lad, we had a small stub of candle on't back wi' some red quality street wrappers around it to change the colour. People these days? More money than sense, bah, humbug, etc etc' 

 

.

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inicholson [48 posts] 1 month ago
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Loved my See.Sense Icon2 for the whole of the three weeks I owned it. Unfortunately it's bigger than previous generations and seems too big for the mount - my one fell off never to be seen again.
I know exactly where it fell off because my Cycliq Fly6v filmed it happening!

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PpPete [62 posts] 1 month ago
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I'd suggest the Alpkit Tau for inclusion in the list.  Looks a bit like the Oxford one listed above, but good USB cover, weights less than an ounce, and bright enough for a "be seen by".  USB charge lasts a week of my commute (10 x 35minutes) on flashing setting.  Dead cheap too.

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De Sisti [11 posts] 1 month ago
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kamoshika wrote:

It's worth remembering that rear lights can be too bright if your riding in a group. On the Exmouth Exodus last month I was behind another rider for a while whose light was so bright it was impossible to see anything else.

You should have overtook and rode in front of the rider, so as not to be disturbed by their light.

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matthewn5 [1420 posts] 1 month ago
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+1 for dynamo lights. I set up my distance bike with a Son dynamo hub and front B&M Luxos and rear B&M Secula lights this year for the Dun Run, and blimey, it was like night and day compared to the previous battery lights. The front lens is shaped and designed to light the road evenly and wide - and it works. Turns on and off automatically, leaving smaller 'daylight' running lights during the day. 

I've now transferred the dynamo wheel to the comuter with a B&M Lumotec Eyc (front) and Toplight (rear) to the commuter and taken off the battery lights. It's just so easy, if its dark they come on and if it's daytime they have a running light function. The front light has the same smooth even spread of light across the ground. There's a huge reflector integrated into the rear light which sits neatly under the saddle.

This blog post explains why a shaped lens works better than any 'torch' style lights, however bright they are:

https://janheine.wordpress.com/2018/09/20/myth-14-more-lumens-make-a-bet...

I don't understand why more lights whether battery or USB don't have shaped reflectors - or at least, a collimating lens that spreads the beam out wide.

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HLaB [291 posts] 1 month ago
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cdamian wrote:

Nothing from Lezyne? Zecto and Strip are pretty good.

http://www.lezyne.com/products-led.php

And neither the Cycliq Fly 6? Which I use now, since I got bumped twice.

https://cycliq.com/products/fly6/

I found the Lezyne lights great in their first two winters too but their longer time battery life is terrible. No warning they switched off mid commute on me  7
I ended up switching to the Nightrider Sabre.
I'm also using the Fly 6 not really for the camera, as there's never been an incident on my commute, although 12 of the 15 miles is down the busway cycle path into Cambridge. I just use it because it's there  1

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StraelGuy [1746 posts] 1 month ago
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I've had one of each model of See.Sense and they all have major flaws and don't run half as long as they claim to. I've just bitten the rather expensive bullet and ordered an Exposure Blaze Mk 3. I have a Diablo Mk. 6 on the front and it's brilliant and has never been a bit of trouble.

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