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Weight loss secrets of the (cheapskate) stars

Everyone likes a light bike, but nobody likes spending money unnecessarily. Choose carefully and you can shed a couple of pounds — or more — from your bike without breaking the bank.

For many of us, tweaking and upgrading your bike is part of the fun of cycling, and ending up with a lighter bike is a common aim. Very very ight components are expensive, but the good news is that if you're starting out with a typical £1,000 bike, there's plenty of scope for saving weight without spending a fortune.

Wheels

Novatec Jetfly SL wheels.jpg

This is one of the most popular upgrades because the stock wheels on many bikes aren’t great and often weigh between 1,850g and 2,150g. A change of wheels to something lighter and better-built can make a substantial difference to your bike’s feel and overall weight. 

For £364.66, we really like Novatec's Jetfly SL wheels at 1,335g. That's an actual weight, by the way; you can read our review of them for more details.

There are a few other eye-catching deals on worth checking out as we put this latest edition of this guide together. If your bike is running disc brakes it's hard to look beyond Hunt's Aero Light Disc Wheelset at £389 for a claimed 1,488g.

You can spend a lot more than this without saving any more weight; if you're determined to spend big on wheels, get some with aero rims.

Tyres

michelin power tyres9.jpg

Wire-beaded tyres commonly fitted as original equipment on bikes, like the Schwalbe Lugano, Vittoria Zaffiro, Specialized Espoir Sport and Bontrager R1 typically weight 340-370g each in 25mm width, so there's a lot of scope for trimming weight there. In general lighter tyres also roll faster, giving an extra performance boost for your money.

You can pick up a 215g, 25mm Michelin Power Competition for just £27.95, so compared to those original equipment tyres you're saving around 470g. You're also whacking off a big chunk of rolling resistance. The Power Competition has half the rolling resistance of a Schwalbe Lugano, according to bicyclerollingresistance.com. That's 20 fewer watts to do 18mph, which is a difference you can feel.

We used to recommend the Continental Grand Prix 4000s II, but they've just about vanished from retailers, replaced by the Grand Prix 5000. The best price we've found for the 220g, 25mm GP5000 is £38, so the Michelin Power Competition is currently the way to go for budget gram-trimming.

All that said, if all that matters is weight and you’re doing, say, a time trial on very clean roads, then Continental’s smooth-treaded 150g Supersonics at £32.99 are the way to go.

Tubes

conti-tube-supersonic-race28 (1).jpg

Inner tubes are a surprisingly cost-effective place to save weight. That’s because even the lightest tubes are relatively cheap compared to saving weight by replacing a major component like the saddle or your wheels.

Your three best choices are £10 Continental Supersonic tubes at 50g each, 65g Schwalbe Extra Light tubes at a fiver each and 80g Vittoria Ultralite tubes which can be had for £3.69. The Schwalbe tubes are probably the best compromise.

Saddle

pro griffon ti saddle

If Pro Bike Gear seats fit your bum, then the titanium-railed version of the Pro Griffon, currently on offer for just £19.99, is a bargain at a claimed 205g. If you have a bit more spare cash, the 145g San Marco Selle Regale Protek Carbon FX is £70. To go any lighter, you're looking at hefty three figure price tags, like the Selle San Marco Mantra Superleggera that weighs 112g, but costs a wallet-clenching £180.

Saddle manufacturers don't often pay much attention to the weight of women's saddles, but the £50 PRO Turnix Women's Carbon saddle is 197g, significantly lighter than the typical stock women's saddle.

Read more: Buyer's guide to performance saddles.

Seat post

Selcof Delta HM seatpost.jpg

Bargain lightweight seatposts are rare, but they do exist. Selcof's £59.99     Delta HM seatpost remains our go-to recommendation – decently light at a claimed 210g thanks to its carbon monocoque construction.

Alternatives include the £63.99 Fizik Cyrano R3 (215g) or, if you need a size other than 27.2mm or 31.6mm, your best choice at the moment is the good old Thomson Elite, which will set you back about £54 and weighs around 230g in a 330mm length or 201g for the recommended for road 250mm. It's available in wide variety of sizes and in both inline and set back designs.

Handlebar

Zero100-RHM_black.jpg

Saving a substantial amount of weight here is expensive. You have to go carbon fibre to lop more than 100g off the typical 325g and you quickly get into diminishing returns.

At 248g (42cm width), the Deda Zero100 RHM bar is made from high-strength 7075 aluminium alloy and costs around £50. It features a shallow drop and Deda's Rapid Hand Movement bend shape that's claimed to make it easier to shift your position.

Stem

wcs-c260-blatte-stem_1.jpg

You might guess there's not much weight to be saved in a small part like the stem, and you'd be right. A typical £1,000 bike comes with a reasonable forged stem that weighs about 140-150g in a 110mm length. The lightest 110mm stems — such as the £75 Ritchey WCS 260 — are about 110g, so you pay a lot to save a few grams. Worth it if you have to buy a stem to change your position, otherwise, probably not.

In the same area of the bike, FSA polycarbonate headset spacers weigh just 1g each in 5mm thickness and cost £4-£6 for a pack of ten. Bargain!

Nuts and bolts

Purple aluminium bolts.jpg

It's tempting to try and shed a few grams by replacing steel bolts in places like stem clamps with titanium or aluminium bolts. We have just one word of advice: don't.

High-strength aluminium and titanium alloys are great in parts designed around their properties, but you can't just swap materials without changing the design. If you replace the high-strength steel in a bolt with aluminium or titanium, the resulting bolt won't be as strong or durable. If a bolt fails in a handlebar stem, you'll be lucky to get away with a large dentist's bill for tooth repair after the stem lets go of the bar. I'll leave to your imagination the consequences of the failure of a seatposts's saddle clamp bolt.

You can get away with lightweight bolts in a few places, where the load is small and doesn't involve the cyclic changes that cause fatigue: waterbottle bosses; derailleur cable clamp bolts; and headset tension bolts. Otherwise, again: don't do it.

Adding it all up

For fans of tables, here are the cheaper options in the significant components we've mentioned - we've stuck with the Novatec wheels although we could have gone a fair bit cheaper for a small trade off in weight. The total weight loss is just over a kilogram, and could be increased by spending just a few quid more on tubes. For each replacement component we've listed the Hairsine ratio – the grams saved per pound cost. This gives an indication of value for money from the ‘lighten your bike’ perspective.

 

    Stock Weight (g) Replacement Weight (g) Saving (g) Price Hairsine Ratio (g/£)
Wheels Novatec Jetfly SL 2,000 1,335 665 £364.66 1.82
Tyres Michelin Power Competition 25mm 700 230 470 £55.90 8.41
Tubes Schwalbe Extra Light 220 130 90 £10.00 9.00
Saddle Pro Griffon 300 205 95 £19.99 4.75
Seatpost Selcof Delta HM 300 210 90 £60.00 1.50
Bar Deda Zero100 RHM 325 248 77 £49.99 1.54
Spacers FSA polycarbonate 20 4 16 £6.95 2.30
Cage bolts Pro-Bolt aluminium 16 5 11 £3.64 3.02
Totals       1,514 £571.13 2.65

 

Footnote: As many people have pointed out in the comments, you're much better off laying off the pies and riding more. But lots of people (myself included) enjoy messing about with and upgrading their bikes, and spending money is much more fun than discipline and self-denial.

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Road.cc buyer's guides are maintained and updated by John Stevenson. Email John with comments, corrections or queries.

Acknowledged by the Telegraph as a leading cycling journalist, John Stevenson has been writing about bikes and cycling for over 30 years since discovering that people were mug enough to pay him for it rather than expecting him to do an honest day's work.

He was heavily involved in the mountain bike boom of the late 1980s as a racer, team manager and race promoter, and that led to writing for Mountain Biking UK magazine shortly after its inception. He got the gig by phoning up the editor and telling him the magazine was rubbish and he could do better. Rather than telling him to get lost, MBUK editor Tym Manley called John’s bluff and the rest is history.

Since then he has worked on MTB Pro magazine and was editor of Maximum Mountain Bike and Australian Mountain Bike magazines, before switching to the web in 2000 to work for CyclingNews.com. Along with road.cc editor Tony Farelly, John was on the launch team for BikeRadar.com and subsequently became editor in chief of Future Publishing’s group of cycling magazines and websites, including Cycling Plus, MBUK, What Mountain Bike and Procycling.

John has also written for Cyclist magazine, edited the BikeMagic website and was founding editor of TotalWomensCycling.com before handing over to someone far more representative of the site's main audience.

He joined road.cc in 2013 and these days he lives in Cambridge where the lack of hills is more than made up for by the headwinds.

59 comments

Avatar
pedalpowerDC [380 posts] 3 years ago
3 likes

An upgraded crankset potentially drops a lot more weight and is much easier and cheaper to install than a set of bars. With bars, you've definitely got to buy new tape, and you might end up having to re cable some of the bike. It's an afternoon project for a novice DIY'r that may require you to buy a tourque wrench, if you don't already have one.

Avatar
armb [173 posts] 3 years ago
1 like
Simmo72 wrote:

Re "nuts and bolts"

That is a strong view point but I can't say I agree.  Plenty of leading manufacturers produce seaposts and stems with titanium bolts, pedals with titanium spindals etc....and i have some of it.  What is this founded on?  I've witnessed an alloy stem break and I've snapped a pair of alloy handlebars.  

You would hope the leading manufacturers parts are examples of "high-strength aluminium and titanium alloys are great in parts designed around their properties", not designing the part for a steel bolt, then later swapping in a lighter bolt of the same size and hoping it's as strong and as fatigue resistant.

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nortonpdj [225 posts] 3 years ago
1 like

Please check your "facts"

Vittoria Ultralite tubes do not weigh 55g!

https://www.vittoria.com/accessories/road-accessory/

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ajd [66 posts] 3 years ago
2 likes

Skewer upgrades were the worst thing I tried.

Soon after fitting them I noticed a creaking noise "somewhere".

Tried tightening bars, stem, pedals, BB. Drove me crazy!

Eventually swapped the wheels to my training ones - creak gone.

ARRRGGHHHHH.

 

Stock Fulcrum skewers just work.

Avatar
tritecommentbot [2266 posts] 2 years ago
3 likes
ajd wrote:

Skewer upgrades were the worst thing I tried.

Soon after fitting them I noticed a creaking noise "somewhere".

Tried tightening bars, stem, pedals, BB. Drove me crazy!

Eventually swapped the wheels to my training ones - creak gone.

ARRRGGHHHHH.

 

Stock Fulcrum skewers just work.

 

Wow. Maybe this is my problem!

Been working on a ridiculously loud squeak for a week now. After doing everything from seatpost, bottom bracket, chainring bolts, complete headset rework etc, ended up finding it was the rear wheel. 

 

Figured it was the hub. Tried two other sets of wheels and everything is silent.

 

Maybe it's actually the skewer, have to try that! Hope so.

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Chris Hayes [459 posts] 2 years ago
3 likes

Nothing wrong with pimping your ride, but speaking for myself a dose of  steamed spinach and  chicken for a couple of weeks would help more on the weight saving front  1 

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NorthEastJimmy [161 posts] 2 years ago
5 likes

Since my weekly commute has changed from 60 miles to 110, with no change in diet, I've lost over 2.5kg in weight over a period of 3 months.  Obviously i've gotten slightly fitter but I can certainly tell the difference when it comes to climbing quicker!

Going by the above calculation, I've done the equivalent of spending £1,350!  Not that I need to lose weight but at 12st (6 ft)...feel even more determend now!  

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ChrisB200SX [1063 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes
cyclesteffer wrote:

Heres a very decent carbon seatpost you could also include. Available in 400mm and a range of sizes. RSP (Raleigh special products) branded. I've been running it for a few weeks and it is lovely. Nice carbon weave and really comfy too. http://www.tredz.co.uk/.RSP-Elite-Carbon-Seatpost_50752.htm?sku=136830&u...

I've got one of these, not fitted it yet. They seem to sell two slightly different ones?

Cinelli Neos carbon bar is £110 at Halfords/Wiggle, I'm having a little trouble settling on a cheap/lightweight stem, 7075 seems to be the right material. 100-120g is stem target, anything at a low price will do, I know there are a few out there, just can't find a decent deal yet.

Security aero skewers were about £7 and save some weight too, just need one Allen key.

Gave up on conti super light inner tubes, punctured one when fitting it.

Shimano 105 groupset to replace old Sora-ish kit, Flo30 wheels. Hoping to take about 1.5kg off my MEKK Poggio 1.5 

Avatar
Joeinpoole [468 posts] 2 years ago
2 likes
Vejnemojnen wrote:

many people overlook finish kit when trying to shred weight, but it is a mistake imho.

good lightweight alloy bars with a nice curvature (latter is paramount! that is why i love deda zero100 and ritchey wcs classic curve..) : a sub-260grams alloy bar has quite significant flex and compliance as compared to stock 333 gram bars, which can punish the wrists and palms far too much.  1

 

chinese carbon seatpost with 25mm setback: good for regular road-graver riding for riders up to 110 kgs, and they flex quite a bit, and even good at reducing high frequency road vibrations from imperfections of the asphalt.

 

kalloy uno stem from ebay: go figure. looks stealthy with graphics removed, and you can easily adjust the bike fit to your likings due to their range of length and 6-7-17 degree variants.

 

tyres-tubes are very important: a good set of tyres will improve ride quality better than anything else out there.

Is it just me or do other people simply skim straight through postings by people too lazy to capitalize/punctuate their sentences properly? Too much like hard work trying to decipher what they're on about.

Avatar
reliablemeatloaf [107 posts] 2 years ago
1 like
Joeinpoole wrote:
Vejnemojnen wrote:

many people overlook finish kit when trying to shred weight, but it is a mistake imho.

good lightweight alloy bars with a nice curvature (latter is paramount! that is why i love deda zero100 and ritchey wcs classic curve..) : a sub-260grams alloy bar has quite significant flex and compliance as compared to stock 333 gram bars, which can punish the wrists and palms far too much.  1

 

chinese carbon seatpost with 25mm setback: good for regular road-graver riding for riders up to 110 kgs, and they flex quite a bit, and even good at reducing high frequency road vibrations from imperfections of the asphalt.

 

kalloy uno stem from ebay: go figure. looks stealthy with graphics removed, and you can easily adjust the bike fit to your likings due to their range of length and 6-7-17 degree variants.

 

tyres-tubes are very important: a good set of tyres will improve ride quality better than anything else out there.

Is it just me or do other people simply skim straight through postings by people too lazy to capitalize/punctuate their sentences properly? Too much like hard work trying to decipher what they're on about.

 

I think they forget they are trying to communicate with adults; they think they are texting their 14-year-old niece.

Avatar
ChrisB200SX [1063 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

I settled on a Kalloy Uno stem, under 110g for £19 and Cannondale use them on their bikes.

I think there is another Carbon handlebar on Wiggle, Deda for £106.

Looking forward to getting the bike back with much less mass and more aero.

Avatar
Vejnemojnen [289 posts] 2 years ago
2 likes
reliablemeatloaf wrote:
Joeinpoole wrote:
Vejnemojnen wrote:

many people overlook finish kit when trying to shred weight, but it is a mistake imho.

good lightweight alloy bars with a nice curvature (latter is paramount! that is why i love deda zero100 and ritchey wcs classic curve..) : a sub-260grams alloy bar has quite significant flex and compliance as compared to stock 333 gram bars, which can punish the wrists and palms far too much.  1

 

chinese carbon seatpost with 25mm setback: good for regular road-graver riding for riders up to 110 kgs, and they flex quite a bit, and even good at reducing high frequency road vibrations from imperfections of the asphalt.

 

kalloy uno stem from ebay: go figure. looks stealthy with graphics removed, and you can easily adjust the bike fit to your likings due to their range of length and 6-7-17 degree variants.

 

tyres-tubes are very important: a good set of tyres will improve ride quality better than anything else out there.

Is it just me or do other people simply skim straight through postings by people too lazy to capitalize/punctuate their sentences properly? Too much like hard work trying to decipher what they're on about.

 

 

I think they forget they are trying to communicate with adults; they think they are texting their 14-year-old niece.

 

It's my mistake, pardon me.

 

I'm not a native English speaker, and in my native tongue, we usually just don't use capitalization. Almost never.  1

 

Anyway, I still believe that finish-kit weight savings offer more comfort as well.

Lighter bars generally flex more, and not that harsh, which can make nice difference in vibration dampening.

 

Lighter tyres with thinner walls are more compliant.

 

Stems, which are not that rigid can actually improve ride quality.

 

And lower tyre pressures not just offer more grip and comfort, but lighter as well  1 (smaller air volume)

 

If I'd try to shred some weight, I'd go:

-Tufo Calibra plus from wiggle

-Michelin Latex inner tubes-wiggle

-Kalloy Uno stem from ebay

-Cosine Ti-railed saddle from Wiggle

-Chinese carbon seatpost from aliexpress

-Deda Zero100 or Ritchey WCS EvoCurve bars from wiggle or PBK

Avatar
muppetteer [95 posts] 2 years ago
2 likes

Always thought stiff trumps light if there's a few grams in it. Got some DTSwiss ratchet type skewers, which are the tightest, stiffest skewers I've ever used. On some Eurus's there's no flex at all. Ever. Under any amount of power. 

Avatar
PaulBox [681 posts] 2 years ago
2 likes

I recently picked up a Cannondale Supersix Evo - Tiagra 10sp very cheap from Sigma.

It weighed in at 9.22kg

From stock I switched to:

Fizik Kium railed saddle

Zipp 30 wheels (conti four season tyres & conti tubes)

Ultegra groupset (apart from chainset) 11sp

FSA Carbon Chainset

It now weighs 7.75kg

Not a particularly great improvement and I wouldn't say that it makes much difference going up hills, it just generally feels more nimble and the shifting and braking is definitely better.

In terms of bang for my buck, that was awesome. Apart from some new cables and bar tape nothing was new, it all came from other bikes  1

Avatar
PaulBox [681 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

I've just remembered that I changed the stem and bars too, not for weight purposes, just to make this bike more aligned to my best bike.

Avatar
lindow_man [8 posts] 2 years ago
1 like

Or you could cut down on the pies

Avatar
Rose on a Rose [42 posts] 2 years ago
5 likes

Dropped over 30kg with Slimming World and cycling to work.
Best upgrade ever.

Avatar
ChainedToTheWheel [23 posts] 2 years ago
3 likes
Simon E wrote:

spending a wodge to save 500g off your bike is an indulgence, a bit of fun

I think people who are banging on about diet and whatnot are missing the point above: sure, it might be cheaper and more effective to lose 2kg off your belly than 1kg off the bike, but that doesn't make the bike 1kg lighter though does it?!?

Avatar
Cugel [77 posts] 1 year ago
3 likes

As many have remarked, weight saving in the bicycle achieves very little in improving the performance of the ride - "performance" meaning increase in average speed, spending less effort for the same journey time or similar. So the article is redundant to all except the marketing men and their victims.

If a better performance is required of the bicycle - making it faster for the same effort or less effort for the same speed - it would be preferable to have an article describing what could be "upgraded" on the bike to achieve that. Weight of the component is a very minor factor. What really matters is the efficiency of a component's function(s).

A well known example, also mentioned in this thread, is the aero wheel which, despite being significantly heavier than the skinny wheel, will allow you to go faster for the same effort. Tyres that roll better (and don't reduce your average speed because of frequent punctures) is another example.

What matters, in the end, is the functional efficiency of the whole bike in allowing you go faster (also for longer). Some bikes, even superlight expensive ones, can be functionally inefficient in a variety of ways, not least via making the cyclist so uncomfortable she cannot output optimum energy for very long.

Therefore, I hereby commission the RoadCC org to compose an article: "How to increase your bike's efficiency on the cheap".

There will then be comments about increasing the efficiency of the "engine" instead of buying bike bits.  Quite right!   1

 

Avatar
MarkiMark [104 posts] 11 months ago
5 likes

You mentioned something called pies in your article. Do you have more information please. They sound nice.

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ChrisB200SX [1063 posts] 9 months ago
0 likes

I've done most of these adding lightness upgrades, although I'm much more aero-focussed as that is way more important to going faster.

You can get carbon handlebars for about £100, Brand X are even cheaper from the big online retailers. Shape and fit to suit the rider is really more important than the 100g weight saving, same with saddle. I've got the Cinelli Neos (~£100, could have got a 10% NUS discount), not much extra money over the aluminium one in the article, but I would mention that it flexes a lot (and creaks) compared to the cheap(?) aluminium bar the bike came with.

I just fitted the Pro Falcon seat (from Merlin at £20, also the Griffin was on sale both down from £80). It seems marginally more comfy (Titanium rails) than what the bike came with. Seems about 100g lighter and the old one was quite scuffed anyway.

I've got the Selcof seatpost, although I swapped out a lighter and cheaper RS-R one (Selcof looked marginally more aero). I'll be swapping this again for a Rose XC-170 Flex once I can get my discount code working. Weights are all about the same but I'm hoping the flex adds some comfort. RS-R seatpost might fit the mountain bike.

Stems are around £20 for a 100g 100mm normal stem with steel bolts. Kalloy Uno (6 or 7) they manufacture for most of the big brands, think it's their stems are on the recent/current Cannondales. You can save another 10g with Ti bolts.

Polycarb stem spaces look a bit, err, different. Not sure I'd opt for this again. I'm the type that etches off the logos on the £20 stem, that took hours, but much more subtle/stealth now.

I won't bother with Conti Supersonic tubes again, punctured while fitting on my first attempt, still got a few though.

Halo skewers are light and aero, worth the pocket money they cost, because do you ever remove a wheel without needing to get some tools out anyway?

Avatar
slappop [80 posts] 9 months ago
0 likes

I've noticed a trend recently where riders attach what look like dinner plates to their wheels. (I presume it's a hip-hop thing.) Shed those and the miles will fly by...

Avatar
fukawitribe [2895 posts] 9 months ago
0 likes
slappop wrote:

I've noticed a trend recently where riders attach what look like dinner plates to their wheels. (I presume it's a hip-hop thing.) Shed those and the miles will fly by...

OTIO

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slappop [80 posts] 9 months ago
0 likes
fukawitribe wrote:

OTIO

You're so used to thinking everything is a 'troll', that you've forgotten the concept of a 'joke'.

Avatar
fukawitribe [2895 posts] 9 months ago
1 like
slappop wrote:
fukawitribe wrote:

OTIO

You're so used to thinking everything is a 'troll', that you've forgotten the concept of a 'joke'.

Perhaps you're right, certainly on here - similar sounding stuff from folk who seem to believe The Rules are real and ratios lower than 53-11 or any tech since wood rims or flip-flip hubs are the work of the Devil or for the weak and needy.

Avatar
slappop [80 posts] 9 months ago
1 like
fukawitribe wrote:

Perhaps you're right, certainly on here - similar sounding stuff from folk who seem to believe The Rules are real and ratios lower than 53-11 or any tech since wood rims or flip-flip hubs are the work of the Devil or for the weak and needy.

Yea, my highest gear is a 50-12 (the horror!) and I'll occasionally revisit the Rules for a good laugh...

Avatar
fukawitribe [2895 posts] 9 months ago
1 like
slappop wrote:
fukawitribe wrote:

Perhaps you're right, certainly on here - similar sounding stuff from folk who seem to believe The Rules are real and ratios lower than 53-11 or any tech since wood rims or flip-flip hubs are the work of the Devil or for the weak and needy.

Yea, my highest gear is a 50-12 (the horror!) and I'll occasionally revisit the Rules for a good laugh...

...and I have a road bike with a 34T out back - we're basically f****d, aren't we ? 

Avatar
Pfaff [30 posts] 1 month ago
2 likes

Leight weight stem att a reasonable price https://www.rosebikes.co.uk/rose-osc-stem-488286

used them for years.

 

Avatar
ChrisB200SX [1063 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes
Pfaff wrote:

Leight weight stem att a reasonable price https://www.rosebikes.co.uk/rose-osc-stem-488286

used them for years.

 

That's the Kally Uno 7 stem with different logos. £22.64 is a decent price. I've just imported a 17° 100m one for my spare carbon bike... although I'm not 100% sure it's not the 7° version.

Seems like they've been fitted to Decathlon's B'Twin Triban bikes too from one I saw yesterday.

Also, Platic flat pedals and trainers by choice (and convenient weight savings) for me  4

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