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Petitpierre from Mores is top-end technology for toddlers

It’s an ultralight monocoque, engineered using computer aided design and made from T1000 carbon fibre using state-of-the-art manufacturing technologies… and it’s aimed at riders as young as 18 months.

Munich-based engineer and designer Sebastian Mores reckons that the Mores Petitpierre is the world’s first carbon fibre running bike – or balance bike, if you prefer. We think he’s probably right.

“We are proud to introduce a running bike that has been focused on a child’s development right from the very first sketch,” says Sebastian Mores. “The very low centre of gravity enables kids even as young as 1.5 years in age to move easily and have fun. Thanks to the low weight and the optimized design, the Petitpierre is incredibly stable, easy to manoeuvre, and can easily be lifted to cross kerbs and obstacles."

The carbon-fibre frame with CNC-milled dropouts weighs just 600g, and the Petitpierre comes with LED lights in the Velo saddle and on the ends of the handlebars. A Tektro rear-mounted mini-V-brake takes care of stopping, the cable running internally – as it does on many high-end bikes these days. Two sizes are available, covering ages from 1.5=5 years.

There’s often a ‘but’, and you can probably guess what it is here: the price. Petitpierres start at €1,499. That's £1,273 at today’s exchange rate, which is clearly a big chunk more than you'll pay for a wooden equivalent. They're not going for the mass market here!

For more info go to www.mores-design.com.

Mat has worked for loads of bike magazines over 20+ years, and been editor of 220 Triathlon and Cycling Plus. He's been road.cc technical editor for eight years, testing bikes, fettling the latest kit, and trying out the most up-to-the-minute clothing. We send him off around the world to get all the news from launches and shows too. He has won his category in Ironman UK 70.3 and finished on the podium in both marathons he has run. Mat is a Cambridge graduate who did a post-grad in magazine journalism, and he is a past winner of the Cycling Media Award for Specialist Online Writer.