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WNT-Rotor women’s pro cycling team will debut new hydraulic groupset next year

We first saw Rotor’s hydraulic groupset at the annual Eurobike show a few years ago - we even got to have a play with it - but things have been a bit quiet since then. But it’s set to make its professional cycling peloton debut next year with the WNT-Rotor Pro Cycling women’s team.

wnt-rotor team3.jpg

wnt-rotor team3.jpg

It will mark the first time a UCI registered team will race with bikes equipped with Rotor’s new groupset. They’ll be riding Orbea Orca OMR road bikes with Rotor also supplying its 2INPower power meters and Q-Rings and new Rvolver hubs.

ROTOR CEO Jose Manuel Banqueri commented on the announcement: “We’re extremely proud to be associated with WNT-ROTOR Pro Cycling team. They are pioneers in women’s professional cycling and we look forward to working together in both product development and competition in the coming season.”

The WNT-Rotor team will comprise of the following riders next season: Anna Badegruber, Lydia Boylan, Natalie Grinczer, Hayley Jones, Melissa Lowther, Elise Maes, Eileen Roe, Hayley Simmonds, Aafke Soet and Lea Lin Teutenberg.

Rotor Uno-8.jpg

Rotor Uno-8.jpg

Rotor's Uno groupset is very different to anything else out there.  Rotor reckons advantages of a fully hydraulic system are smooth activation, low maintenance and multiple shifting positions. Another significant benefit is the lack of batteries compared to current, and very popular, electronic groupsets. It's also light, claims the company, though doesn't offer any actual groupset weights

It’ll be interesting to watch the team closely and see how they get on with the new Uno groupset. The groupset battles have heated up in recent years with SRAM finally going electronic with eTap and FSA also throwing its hat into the ring. Rotor has taken a very different approach, trading electronic wires for hydraulic lines.

It’s not clear if they’ll use disc brakes, the groupset is compatible with disc and rim brakes.

David has worked on the road.cc tech team since July 2012. Previously he was editor of Bikemagic.com and before that staff writer at RCUK. He's a seasoned cyclist of all disciplines, from road to mountain biking, touring to cyclo-cross, he only wishes he had time to ride them all. He's mildly competitive, though he'll never admit it, and is a frequent road racer but is too lazy to do really well. He currently resides in the Cotswolds.

7 comments

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simonmb [575 posts] 3 months ago
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I can't help thinking Rotor have missed the boat here. In the time they've spent fannying around getting their hydraulic system to work, everyone else has got electrics delivering a smooth (although not universally wanted) ride. 

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DrG82 [217 posts] 3 months ago
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Anyone remember shimano airlines? I've a feeling these rotor shifters will go the same way.

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wellsprop [723 posts] 3 months ago
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DrG82 wrote:

Anyone remember shimano airlines? I've a feeling these rotor shifters will go the same way.

Only just googled Shimano Airlines, what a stupid idea XD

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Jimmy Ray Will [852 posts] 3 months ago
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I think hydraulics have a potential place in road cycling, namely in internal routing options for ever more aerodynamic bikes. 

However, what Rotor have produced to date is not looking sharp enough to win any sort of market share in this space.

The other market will be the tourer / winter bike where the lack of cables will be advantageous. 

I have seen some weight somewhere by the way... it ain't light. 1600grams minus cranks & bb, chain and cassette. (750, 240 and 200 grams respectively), so a groupset total closer to 2,800grams. 

 

 

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philhubbard [90 posts] 3 months ago
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wellsprop wrote:
DrG82 wrote:

Anyone remember shimano airlines? I've a feeling these rotor shifters will go the same way.

Only just googled Shimano Airlines, what a stupid idea XD

 

I think it also helps that Acros tried this and then decided it was a stupid idea

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cyclisto [360 posts] 3 months ago
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It could be interesting if it provided maintenance free smooth operation for thousands of miles, something like a rolhoff fantasy. But a cassette will get dirty in half an hour of wet riding and it is going to be really expensive.

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DrG82 [217 posts] 3 months ago
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wellsprop wrote:
DrG82 wrote:

Anyone remember shimano airlines? I've a feeling these rotor shifters will go the same way.

Only just googled Shimano Airlines, what a stupid idea XD

Intense (The super expensive MTB brand) actually built a DH frame with an integrated air tank to run shimano airlines.  Apparently there are loads of the kits knocking about in the warehouses of shops around the country because they really bought into it.