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British brand Exposure launches new range of lights packed with useful technology

Exposure has not only increased the brightness of its entire range of lights for 2018 but added a number of new technologies aimed at making cyclists more visible to other road users during the day time. Bluetooth has also been added to some of the company’s brightest mountain bike lights, with a dedicated smartphone app giving you wireless control of the brightness.

Day Bright is a new feature being rolled out for 2018 on front and rear lights. It's a specific pulse pattern (one big, three really fast pulses) and lumen intensity designed to increase your visibility during day time cycling.

It’s the result of the company’s work with the emergency services and is designed to overcome the brain phasing out constant light patterns. Exposure says this pulse pattern is the most noticeable which should help motorists spot you from at least a mile away, even riding through a busy city.

Cars are now required by law to have day time running head lights, and there's growing interest in cyclists also running lights during daylight hours.  Bontrager announced its Flare R rear light in 2015 designed specifically for daytime visibility, and we followed up with a trend piece which you can read here. Trek argues that using a light during the day makes sense because that’s when about 80% of cycling accidents occur. Exposure Lights has also conducted its own research and it's something we'll be taking a closer look at in a future article. 

ReAKT Ambient Kinetic Technology is another new technology and it's found in the rear lights. If it gets lighter, the light gets brighter, so if you’re riding in the daytime and going through dappled light, the technology will adjust the brightness to ensure you’re seen at all times. It also senses braking forces and will get brighter accordingly.

- Your guide to the best front lights for cycling

exposure lights 2018_-6.jpg

exposure lights 2018_-6.jpg

The Strada range of road-specific front lights has proved popular, and Exposure has updated the range and now offers a 1200, 900 and 600 lumen light,  priced £289.95, £244.95 and £199.95 respectively. Each light features Day Bright technology and offers minimum burn times of 3 hours.

exposure lights 2018_-8.jpg

exposure lights 2018_-8.jpg

The Joystick is a popular little light and is now in its 12th generation, and now provides 1000 lumens. A versatile light with a low weight of just 88g and a run time of between 1.5 and 36 hours, it costs £159.95.

The Trace, Link and Link Plus are the smallest front lights in the company’s range, and each gets Day Bright tech. Both the ink and Link Plus can be run either as front lights, rear lights or front and rear lights, providing a good option for helmet mounting for really boosting your visibility to other road users.

exposure lights 2018_-10.jpg

exposure lights 2018_-10.jpg

The Link Plus (£84.95) with its 150 lumen output is a good inner city commuting light to be seen by and can last up to 72 hours on the pulsing mode, and 3 hours on constant.

The smaller Link (£69.95) still manages an impressive 100 lumens and its small size and low weight make it a good get-you-home emergency or backup light. There are three brightness modes and a Fuel Gauge makes it clear when you need to top up the battery.

The Trace (£39.95) is the smallest front light but still packs a 110 lumen punch, and paired with the TraceR (£39.95) rear light makes a really good front and rear light setup.

exposure lights 2018_-11.jpg

exposure lights 2018_-11.jpg

There are four rear lights in the Exposure range. The Blaze ReAKT (£109.95)above  is the most powerful with a 150 lumen maximum output when using the ReAKT mode, 80 lumens in the regular mode, with a minimum 6 hour run time and low 77g weight.

The regular Blaze (£89.95) is essentially the same but does without the ReAKT technology with a max output of 80 lumens and 6 hour run time.  Both those lights also get the Day Bright technology.

exposure lights 2018_-12.jpg

exposure lights 2018_-12.jpg

The TraceR ReAKT (£59.95) joins the TraceR we’ve already mentioned but is boosted by the addition of the Day Bright and reactive light technology.

We'll be testing a handful of these new Exposure Lights soon.

David has worked on the road.cc tech team since July 2012. Previously he was editor of Bikemagic.com and before that staff writer at RCUK. He's a seasoned cyclist of all disciplines, from road to mountain biking, touring to cyclo-cross, he only wishes he had time to ride them all. He's mildly competitive, though he'll never admit it, and is a frequent road racer but is too lazy to do really well. He currently resides in the Cotswolds.

32 comments

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jpj84 [14 posts] 3 months ago
4 likes

Bluetooth? So, rather than have a button on the light itself, I'll have to stop, take off gloves, fish around in my pocket for my phone, unlock the phone, open the app, set the brightness, lock the phone, put it back in my pocket, put my gloves back on, and then ride off??? That's progress for ya  1

Avatar
esayers [50 posts] 3 months ago
1 like
jpj84 wrote:

Bluetooth? So, rather than have a button on the light itself, I'll have to stop, take off gloves, fish around in my pocket for my phone, unlock the phone, open the app, set the brightness, lock the phone, put it back in my pocket, put my gloves back on, and then ride off??? That's progress for ya  1

I did wonder about that, I guess it is aimed at people who have handlebar mounted phones. With cycle computers also bluetooth compatible there would also be scope from controlling it from there.  I do agree though, I do like a good button that can cycle through the modes, much easier to use!

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David Arthur @d... [824 posts] 3 months ago
1 like

esayers wrote:

jpj84 wrote:

Bluetooth? So, rather than have a button on the light itself, I'll have to stop, take off gloves, fish around in my pocket for my phone, unlock the phone, open the app, set the brightness, lock the phone, put it back in my pocket, put my gloves back on, and then ride off??? That's progress for ya  1

I did wonder about that, I guess it is aimed at people who have handlebar mounted phones. With cycle computers also bluetooth compatible there would also be scope from controlling it from there.  I do agree though, I do like a good button that can cycle through the modes, much easier to use!

 

Fear not, they'll still have buttons! And this SYNC tech only applies to three mountain bike lights

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RobD [539 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes
jpj84 wrote:

Bluetooth? So, rather than have a button on the light itself, I'll have to stop, take off gloves, fish around in my pocket for my phone, unlock the phone, open the app, set the brightness, lock the phone, put it back in my pocket, put my gloves back on, and then ride off??? That's progress for ya  1

You could probably  just have a little bluetooth bipper button on your handlebars, a bit like ones for skipping music that will cycle between modes. progress is great isn't it.

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giff77 [1283 posts] 3 months ago
1 like
jpj84 wrote:

Bluetooth? So, rather than have a button on the light itself, I'll have to stop, take off gloves, fish around in my pocket for my phone, unlock the phone, open the app, set the brightness, lock the phone, put it back in my pocket, put my gloves back on, and then ride off??? That's progress for ya  1

i would have thought that you would do that before you head off. At least that's what I would do. 

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handlebarcam [1064 posts] 3 months ago
5 likes

"I find the defendant not guilty, because although the cyclist he killed was wearing a helmet, and hi-vis clothing, he was not using daytime lights, which are now a widely-accepted part of responsible cycling." -- Some magistrate, about ten years from now.

Then, ten more years further on, "...although he was using daytime lights, he was not broadcasting a signal to the warning systems of nearby vehicles, so it was his own fault really."

Still, whatever sells more lights with more dazzling, overpowered, round beam patterns, and gets their customers to fry their batteries sooner, the better for the manufacturers.

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Goldfever4 [388 posts] 3 months ago
1 like

I am interested in what makes any Exposure front light 'road-specific'. They've always seemed more suitable for off-road to me because of the beam patterns.

My Busch & Muller light is bulky but I can keep it on full brightness all the time because of the hard cut-off. Saves me from blinding oncoming traffic. OTOH I can't see when I go around sharp corners so I have a secondary light on my helmet too.

handlebarcam wrote:

Still, whatever sells more lights with more dazzling, overpowered, round beam patterns, and gets their customers to fry their batteries sooner, the better for the manufacturers.

Avatar
Peowpeowpeowlasers [547 posts] 3 months ago
1 like

So no beam cutoff then? Dazzle everyone else? I won't be buying one.

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Bmblbzzz [169 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes
Goldfever4 wrote:

I am interested in what makes any Exposure front light 'road-specific'. They've always seemed more suitable for off-road to me because of the beam patterns.

My Busch & Muller light is bulky but I can keep it on full brightness all the time because of the hard cut-off. Saves me from blinding oncoming traffic. OTOH I can't see when I go around sharp corners so I have a secondary light on my helmet too.

handlebarcam wrote:

Still, whatever sells more lights with more dazzling, overpowered, round beam patterns, and gets their customers to fry their batteries sooner, the better for the manufacturers.

I think they are designed for off road use apart from the Strada, which has a shaped beam along the German lines. 

Avatar
David Arthur @d... [824 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes

Goldfever4 wrote:

I am interested in what makes any Exposure front light 'road-specific'. They've always seemed more suitable for off-road to me because of the beam patterns.

My Busch & Muller light is bulky but I can keep it on full brightness all the time because of the hard cut-off. Saves me from blinding oncoming traffic. OTOH I can't see when I go around sharp corners so I have a secondary light on my helmet too.

handlebarcam wrote:

Still, whatever sells more lights with more dazzling, overpowered, round beam patterns, and gets their customers to fry their batteries sooner, the better for the manufacturers.

 

The beam is shaped so it doesn't dazzle oncoming traffic.

 

You can read our review of the Strada light here http://road.cc/content/review/179341-exposure-strada-mk6

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Goldfever4 [388 posts] 3 months ago
1 like

Going off this article and the Exposure website, I disagree, there are loads seemingly intended for 'on-road' use even if the beam patterns entirely unsuitable.

Bmblbzzz wrote:

I think they are designed for off road use apart from the Strada, which has a shaped beam along the German lines. 

Goldfever4 wrote:

I am interested in what makes any Exposure front light 'road-specific'. They've always seemed more suitable for off-road to me because of the beam patterns.

My Busch & Muller light is bulky but I can keep it on full brightness all the time because of the hard cut-off. Saves me from blinding oncoming traffic. OTOH I can't see when I go around sharp corners so I have a secondary light on my helmet too.

handlebarcam wrote:

Still, whatever sells more lights with more dazzling, overpowered, round beam patterns, and gets their customers to fry their batteries sooner, the better for the manufacturers.

Avatar
Goldfever4 [388 posts] 3 months ago
1 like

Beam of the strada light? I've read that article (useful) and the comments which don't universally agree, not that I have any direct experience with the strada myself. I'd love if Exposure's smaller (and cheaper) lights were designed with other road users in mind too. I want to buy one but haven't because of the beam shape flaws in so many high-output bicycle lights.

 

David Arthur @davearthur wrote:

The beam is shaped so it doesn't dazzle oncoming traffic.

You can read our review of the Strada light here http://road.cc/content/review/179341-exposure-strada-mk6

Goldfever4 wrote:

I am interested in what makes any Exposure front light 'road-specific'. They've always seemed more suitable for off-road to me because of the beam patterns.

My Busch & Muller light is bulky but I can keep it on full brightness all the time because of the hard cut-off. Saves me from blinding oncoming traffic. OTOH I can't see when I go around sharp corners so I have a secondary light on my helmet too.

handlebarcam wrote:

Still, whatever sells more lights with more dazzling, overpowered, round beam patterns, and gets their customers to fry their batteries sooner, the better for the manufacturers.

Avatar
Jimnm [269 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes

Wouldn't cycle in the dark unless its absolutely necessary. 

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crazy-legs [946 posts] 3 months ago
4 likes
Jimnm wrote:

Wouldn't cycle in the dark unless its absolutely necessary. 

Really?! You're missing out. Super quiet roads, you can see cars coming from miles off (and they can see you), you get to see loads of wildlife. I've done rides out to watch the sunset then ride back in the dark, rides through the night and watch the sun come up, late evening training rides...

Decent lights totally transform your riding, give you all sorts of options especially in winter.

Exposure are superb, all my lights have been from them.

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Chris Hayes [174 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes

Great lights. Not sure that the extra 200 lumens on the 1000 justifies a 80 quid premium over the 800 though... The rear comes with a great fitting that sits under the seat so doesn't disturb the clean lines of the bike....  The beam pattern seems to be adequate, but it's not as focussed as some - that said you have to spend a lot more money to get better results.

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ktache [627 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes

Last years Axis as my hemet light.  Cannot fault it.

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tomascjenkins [60 posts] 3 months ago
1 like

Joystick is terrible for road rides, lights up the canopy and drivers flash their headlights as it's so dazzling. For its power the beam is really weak where you want it!

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BehindTheBikesheds [992 posts] 3 months ago
1 like

The Strada as per most of the rubbish these days spills light everywhere,

I use a Sigma PAVA, 4xAA batts runs the 25 Lux high setting for approx 10 hours, that's bright enough for 30mph runs in complete darkness ...because the beam is focused all on the road in front, not spewing out as per the usual unfettered rubbish.

The lower setting is good for 20mph easy and will do more than 20 hours.

oh and it takes around 3 seconds to fit or remove from the bars, best all round road light ever IMHO.

Avatar
wycombewheeler [1237 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes
tomascjenkins wrote:

Joystick is terrible for road rides, lights up the canopy and drivers flash their headlights as it's so dazzling. For its power the beam is really weak where you want it!

I only use it for looking at the route on the garmin. Have it pointed well down, and turn slightly keftvif there are oncoming cars. Not ideal as a main light. But just about acceptable if the main light fails.

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Johnnystorm [97 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes
esayers wrote:
jpj84 wrote:

Bluetooth? So, rather than have a button on the light itself, I'll have to stop, take off gloves, fish around in my pocket for my phone, unlock the phone, open the app, set the brightness, lock the phone, put it back in my pocket, put my gloves back on, and then ride off??? That's progress for ya  1

I did wonder about that, I guess it is aimed at people who have handlebar mounted phones. With cycle computers also bluetooth compatible there would also be scope from controlling it from there.  I do agree though, I do like a good button that can cycle through the modes, much easier to use!

I doubt it's just to switch modes. Many of the exposure lights have multiple sets of modes that can be used. E.g. you can have the modes so that there is a hi, med and low setting that lasts 1, 4 and 10 hrs respectively. Or a mode that h, m and l last 4, 10 and 24hrs, etc. On my diablo to change these requires you to hold the button down for x seconds, count the light flashes, and something else I can never remember! Bring on the app!

Avatar
letrip [5 posts] 3 months ago
1 like

I love riding with my exposure lights. (Six pack handlbar, Diablo Helmet) XC night riding is like riding in a tunnel, you only see what you need to see and it adds to the sense of speed. On the road as well, same thing. Really do need the remote button on the road though cars do get miffed otherwise. One day we'll have adaptive beams, like on my car, you can them leave the beam on full permanently and it will auto change if front or rear lights are seen. But on the trail the rider in front does love the beam thrown by the Six Pack past them.

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Jason Kurn [6 posts] 3 months ago
1 like

Bit confused by this light.  For ages lights have been a law unto themselves ignoring  legislation.  But this model has had input from emergency services, and features day running mode, and set up not to dazzle oncoming traffic. Innitially I thought well done, it legal like most of the German brands. But when looking at the review it does appear that light is being emitted above the horizontal plane from where it's fitted. That means it's likely illegal. Yes, in the UK front cycle lights MUST be dipped and can only emit a trivial amount of light above the horizontal plane they're fitted on. I guess the manufactures would state people are meant to aim it downards at the ground, but in that case the review should be based on that. 

Most cyclists ignore this legal requirment for front lights, but after a recent court case where a cyclist did not have front breaks, I'd be more cautions about breaking the law if it could in any way be used to put blame on me. 

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oldstrath [922 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes
Jason Kurn wrote:

Bit confused by this light.  For ages lights have been a law unto themselves ignoring  legislation.  But this model has had input from emergency services, and features day running mode, and set up not to dazzle oncoming traffic. Innitially I thought well done, it legal like most of the German brands. But when looking at the review it does appear that light is being emitted above the horizontal plane from where it's fitted. That means it's likely illegal. Yes, in the UK front cycle lights MUST be dipped and can only emit a trivial amount of light above the horizontal plane they're fitted on. I guess the manufactures would state people are meant to aim it downards at the ground, but in that case the review should be based on that. 

Most cyclists ignore this legal requirment for front lights, but after a recent court case where a cyclist did not have front breaks, I'd be more cautions about breaking the law if it could in any way be used to put blame on me. 

So, a few nights ago I was out with a mate - me using my Ixon IQ, him his 'illegal' Strada. Police car passes us, then turns round and stops. The driver asks what mate's light is, so he can buy one.

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oldstrath [922 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes
tomascjenkins wrote:

Joystick is terrible for road rides, lights up the canopy and drivers flash their headlights as it's so dazzling. For its power the beam is really weak where you want it!

Which is why Exposure market it for off road, for which purpose it is excellent.

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Grumpy17 [86 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

The Strada as per most of the rubbish these days spills light everywhere,

I use a Sigma PAVA, 4xAA batts runs the 25 Lux high setting for approx 10 hours, that's bright enough for 30mph runs in complete darkness ...because the beam is focused all on the road in front, not spewing out as per the usual unfettered rubbish.

The lower setting is good for 20mph easy and will do more than 20 hours.

oh and it takes around 3 seconds to fit or remove from the bars, best all round road light ever IMHO.

 

Same as this one?

https://www.mantel.com/uk/sigma-pava-headlight#reviews

Seems somewhat inexpensive for such a glowing recommendation.

Avatar
oldstrath [922 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes
Grumpy17 wrote:
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

The Strada as per most of the rubbish these days spills light everywhere,

I use a Sigma PAVA, 4xAA batts runs the 25 Lux high setting for approx 10 hours, that's bright enough for 30mph runs in complete darkness ...because the beam is focused all on the road in front, not spewing out as per the usual unfettered rubbish.

The lower setting is good for 20mph easy and will do more than 20 hours.

oh and it takes around 3 seconds to fit or remove from the bars, best all round road light ever IMHO.

 

Same as this one?

https://www.mantel.com/uk/sigma-pava-headlight#reviews

Seems somewhat inexpensive for such a glowing recommendation.

Don't know about the Pava, but this one is reasonable  https://www.rosebikes.com/article/b--m-ixon-core-led-front-light-761147/...

at least up to about 20 mph. The two problems I have with this and similar are the "riding in a tunnel" effect, and the inability to cope well on very twisty routes. Both occur because the way to make a low power light seem adequate is to illuminate a very limited area. This is sold as an advantage by the enthusiasts, and it surely avoids "dazzle", but it is a bit limiting sometimes.

Avatar
BehindTheBikesheds [992 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes
Grumpy17 wrote:
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

The Strada as per most of the rubbish these days spills light everywhere,

I use a Sigma PAVA, 4xAA batts runs the 25 Lux high setting for approx 10 hours, that's bright enough for 30mph runs in complete darkness ...because the beam is focused all on the road in front, not spewing out as per the usual unfettered rubbish.

The lower setting is good for 20mph easy and will do more than 20 hours.

oh and it takes around 3 seconds to fit or remove from the bars, best all round road light ever IMHO.

 

Same as this one?

https://www.mantel.com/uk/sigma-pava-headlight#reviews

Seems somewhat inexpensive for such a glowing recommendation.

That's the one, I came across one through a Spanish Ebay seller along with some other bits. Cost me about £18, not sure what the orig RRP was.

it's compact, it takes literally a few seconds to fit/remove, good waterproofing, simple operation (two steady modes only), geat run time, good level of brightness, good run time, tool free access to batt compartment.

I use Fujitsu rechargeables, same as for my Fuji camera, with a decent charger in theory I can get 10,000 hours of illumination on the high setting for just over £54 including the electricty, charger (micro control LED job that can refresh too) and 2x4 top of the range AA batts.

They're not as easily available as they went out of production a while back. There are brighter lights by Sigma and companies like B&M, even the old Philips Saferide can still be had but both have their design flaws from what I've read.

If you really needed more light, buy two, the light head does swivel slightly too.

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Trickytree1984 [47 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes

I don't seem to be able to find any useful information about their ReAKT technology anywhere. No demo, no review no real description of it at all.

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StraelGuy [1096 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes

I've run a Diablo mk. 6 for the last couple of winters. In 1/3 mode it's perfect: 433 lumens for the road and the full 1,300 for off roading on the farm tracks. It is ridiculously powerful but I have it pointing at the road about 8 feet in front of the bike and it's still good enough for 20+ mph and you can see all the hazards on the road. 

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BarryBianchi [419 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes
Trickytree1984 wrote:

I don't seem to be able to find any useful information about their ReAKT technology anywhere. No demo, no review no real description of it at all.

Exposure are good at that.  I tried to work out/research the functions on my 6 pack - gave up in the end.  They do seem to just ram on useless stuff to up the price - the accelerometer thing is as useless as it is annoying - though the lights themselves are really good.

Bluetooth control my arse.  They already did/do a remote switch that plugs into the smart port and works perfectly either on the hoods for road, or bar for other.  Anything bluetooth WILL be unreliable and let you down when you need it to work most.  Solving a problem that doesn't exist.

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