Time Xpresso 2 pedals  £49.99

8/10

The relatively low price of Xpresso 2s makes them a sensible place to start if you're a newcomer to road-specific click-in pedals.

Weight 220g   Contact  www.extrauk.co.uk

by Steve Worland   October 17, 2013  

Time Xpresso 2 pedals

The relatively low price of Time Xpresso 2 pedals makes them a sensible place to start if you're a newcomer to road-specific click-in pedals. They're light, easy to use and very easy to adjust to different foot position and release preferences, but the low price shows in the limited durability of both the pedals and the cleats.

Time Xpresso pedals are popular because they're easy to click into, offer just the right amount of float adjustment for many riders and they're light. At about 220g per pair the entry level Xpresso 2s only weigh 25g more than the carbon Xpresso 8s at £124.99.

Weight isn't everything but Time's Xpressos also have a more supportive pedalling platform than many of their rivals (that includes Time's previous iClic models) and that's probably the main thing that makes them popular among both experts and relative beginners.

I would generally recommend click-in road novices to start with mountain bike style double sided pedals, but the wider platforms of road specific pedals like Xpressos are more supportive and energy efficient on longer rides so they're worth aspiring to as your abilities progress.

The click-in mechanism of the Xpresso 2s is intuitive and obvious in that their weight balance ensures that they always appear to be in just the right position when you set off. Complete novices still seem to fumble for a while but it's not a long learning process and the solid pedalling response is worth it.

The Xpresso 2's construction is fairly durable, with a steel axle, composite body and composite sprung blade for retention, but they don't have a very good reputation for bearing life. The bearings will often have developed a small amount of play before you get round to taking advantage of the replaceable pedal platforms and they're not serviceable.

Going up-market from the Xpresso 2s gets you a tougher pedal platform with a replaceable steel plate that and a slightly smoother feel to the float, but some riders will prefer the less obvious float of the plastic base platform on the Xpresso 2s.

Not all riders like the feel of float (in this case being able to freely twist your foot 2.5mm to either side without risking disengagement). All Xpresso pedals have a small amount of lateral cleat adjustment as well as the usual fore/aft adjustment and a minimal distance between the shoe sole and the pedal axle.

The release tension is adjustable, ground clearance when pedalling into corners is excellent and the light feel of engagement and the 15 degree cleat release angle seems to suit most riders. Cleats are included and are relatively cheap to replace, a good thing as they do tend to wear quickly.

Verdict

The relatively low price of Xpresso 2s makes them a sensible place to start if you're a newcomer to road-specific click-in pedals.

road.cc test report

Make and model: Time Xpresso 2 pedals

Size tested: n/a

Tell us what the product is for, and who it's aimed at. What do the manufacturers say about it? How does that compare to your own feelings about it?

The cheapest version of Time's popular Xpresso pedal range. Wide foot platform and easy access and release make them a good choice for click-in pedal beginners.

Tell us some more about the technical aspects of the product?

Mainly composite construction. Steel axles.

Rate the product for quality of construction:
 
6/10

The plastic foot plate wears faster than the metal plate on more costly models. The bearings are not serviceable and tend to develop play if used for high mileage.

Rate the product for performance:
 
7/10

Very easy to use in terms of clicking in and out. The small amount of float is popular with most riders. Good ground clearance on corners. Replacement cleats reasonably priced.

Rate the product for durability:
 
6/10

For the price durability is not bad but they're essentially a throw away rather than serviceable item. Not really suited to high mileage riders.

Rate the product for weight, if applicable:
 
9/10

Very light for a pedal at this price.

Rate the product for comfort, if applicable:
 
8/10

Very easy to use.

Rate the product for value:
 
8/10

Good value for low mileage riders.

Tell us how the product performed overall when used for its designed purpose

Perfect.

Tell us what you particularly liked about the product

Low price, big foot platform and ease of use.

Did you enjoy using the product? Yes.

Would you consider buying the product? No.

Would you recommend the product to a friend? Yes.

Anything further to say about the product in conclusion?

More bearing serviceability would increase the appeal but at this price it's not a big deal.

Overall rating: 8/10

About the tester

Age: 58  Height: 181  Weight: 78kg

I usually ride: Merlin Ti  My best bike is: Ibis Silk SL

I've been riding for: Over 20 years  I ride: Every day  I would class myself as: Expert

I regularly do the following types of riding: cyclo cross, commuting, touring, club rides, sportives, general fitness riding, fixed/singlespeed, mtb,

 

9 user comments

Oldest firstNewest firstBest rated

I had a cheap pair of Shimano pedals when I first started riding but have loved my Speedplays ever since switching. Being able to get a sub $70 pair of pedals is great for new cyclists but once you spend well over $100 you can tell a differene

posted by jarredscycling [436 posts]
17th October 2013 - 15:26

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In my opinion this is a well balanced report that truthfully conveys both the good and bad aspects of these pedals. Bearing life is a weakness of recent Time pedals (including the I-Clic's).

posted by rookybiker [28 posts]
17th October 2013 - 19:11

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The cleats wear out incredibly quickly and are more expensive that most cleats such as shimano spd. That said they're an absolute bargain for the money, look good and allow you to still cycle to the pub in trainers if needs be. Can be bought for much cheaper online.

Shamblesuk's picture

posted by Shamblesuk [72 posts]
18th October 2013 - 8:15

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rookybiker wrote:
In my opinion this is a well balanced report that truthfully conveys both the good and bad aspects of these pedals. Bearing life is a weakness of recent Time pedals (including the I-Clic's).

Yep totally agree bearing weakness is a problem for all iClic pedals and you can't service the axle. I'm on my third and final pair and will look at Shimano (I've used Speedplay to but these didn't last either - no spares at the time) when these have worn out. Time should sort this out. On the plus side they are easy to use, cleats wear ok and Time have a 2 year warranty.

posted by Roberj4 [180 posts]
18th October 2013 - 11:45

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Nice looking pedals and a nice stable platform, but they need to round off a few of the sharp edges on them. They've sliced up my legs good and proper! I'm sure I'm not the only one...

Another problem, the tension adjustment screws are made of cheese, be careful or you'll round them off.

All said and done, a bargain (I paid £35), but could do with a revision to sort out a few design flaws.

posted by Nick L [4 posts]
18th October 2013 - 16:01

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Are they still held together by a crummy plastic bolt?

A mate bought them, because they were dirt cheap, but they were absolute trosh. He's replacing them.

A rich man can afford to buy cut price goods.

Sir Velo

Raleigh's picture

posted by Raleigh [1727 posts]
18th October 2013 - 17:11

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I ride Look KEO classic road pedals with grey cleats they seam very firm but with a nice amount of float. They're very comfortable even after a 100 miles.

Endorphines going up and adrenaline going down, who needs drugs?

posted by banzicyclist2 [181 posts]
18th October 2013 - 21:36

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Shamblesuk wrote:
The cleats wear out incredibly quickly and are more expensive that most cleats such as shimano spd. That said they're an absolute bargain for the money, look good and allow you to still cycle to the pub in trainers if needs be. Can be bought for much cheaper online.

3000 miles so far on the cleats that came with my iClic racer 2s, other than looking a bit frayed round the edges they're fine and still engage & disengage as they did at mile 1. I'd say that counts as pretty good cleat wear.

posted by ajmarshal1 [217 posts]
20th October 2013 - 18:36

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Considering that they can't be serviced, I wonder how long they last Thinking

I don't follow trends. Trends follow me.

posted by BBB [171 posts]
25th October 2013 - 17:19

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