Canyon Ultimate CF SLX 9.0 SL  £3719.00

9/10

Fast-accelerating, sharp-handling and lightweight; you'll do well to find a better race bike at this price

Weight 6080g   Contact  www.canyon.com

by Mat Brett   June 9, 2013  

The Canyon Ultimate CF SLX 9.0 SL is fast-accelerating, sharp-handling, lightweight - and you get a helluva lot of bike for your money.

Yes, we know that £3,700 is way more than most people will ever spend on a bike (and you have to pay about £50 extra for packaging and delivery), but this is a professional level race machine. We made the same model our Bike of the Year in 2011, though it has had a major redesign for 2013.

First, we'll take three different aspects of the new design and explain how Canyon have worked on each...

Weight

Everyone likes to know about a bike's weight. We all know that the first thing people do when they see you have a new bike is to pick it up and judge how light it feels. In this case, it's so light it makes people laugh.

Our complete Ultimate CF SLX 9.0 SL, a Large, hit the road.cc Scales of Truth at 6.08kg (13.4lb) without pedals. Bear in mind that the minimum weight for a bike in a UCI-sanctioned event is 6.8kg (15lb). We think that's the lightest bike we've ever had in on test. The frame is just 790g with the fork and Acros Ai-70 headset adding 400g.

How have Canyon saved weight over the previous Ultimate CF SLX? Well, they've shaved off a few grams by using carbon dropouts on both the frame and fork. They've also used a PressFit bottom bracket here, the housing being made of carbon rather than aluminium, to save a bit more weight.

Additionally, Canyon have redesigned many frame features. They've updated the Maximus seat tube, for example. You might remember the Maximus seat tube because it bulges out on the non-driveside for additional rigidity but doesn't do the same on the driveside, so there's more clearance for the drivetrain there. Canyon and Cervélo had a falling out over the design before patching it all up.

Anyway, this third generation Maximus seat tube is a lot slimmer than before, the idea being to add a little more flex for extra comfort, and bring down the weight a touch.

Stiffness

None of these changes seem to have reduced the frame stiffness a bit. On the contrary, the additional width of the PressFit bottom bracket increases the rigidity. Canyon say that this design also allows them to fit the chainstays further out, again adding to the stiffness.

They've pulled a similar trick with the seatstays which are now routed along the side of the seat tube and flow right into the top tube. This increases the width of their stance marginally.

Canyon have dragged the fork legs a little further apart too, which also allows you to fit wider tyres. The front end is was already very stiff thanks to the tapered (1 1/4in top, 1 1/2in bottom) head tube/steerer, but Canyon say that it's now 8% stiffer thanks to changes they've made.

Comfort

Like everyone else, Canyon want to add vertical give to the ride to provide comfort while retaining lateral rigidity – it's one of the biggest clichés in cycling. With the Ultimate CF SLX 9.0 SL, the engineers have slimmed down the Maximus seat tube (see above) to allow a little more flex, and they've flattened the top tube as well for the same reason.

Canyon use a combination of basalt and carbon fibres in the fork blades to help with comfort and it's a similar deal with their own VCLS (Vertical Comfort Lateral Stiffness) seatpost. It's a slim 27.2mm in diameter and it's designed specifically to dampen road vibration. If you want more comfort, you can upgrade to the Canyon Flat Spring Post 2.0 for an additional £111.36 (at the time of writing). This gives you up to 20mm of travel.

Ride

Okay, so that's all theory – a brief explanation of some of the Ultimate CF SLX's key features – but what really counts is the ride, so let's crack on with that.

Guess what you notice first. It's that exceptional lightness. I first rode this bike after a few weeks on a £600 bike and the difference was astonishing... which is exactly what you'd expect. But even compared to bikes closer to its price, the Canyon is incredibly quick off the mark. Put the power down and it's like it was just waiting for an excuse to spring into life.

When you get up to speed and you're riding on the flat, the light weight doesn't make a whole heap of difference, but if your riding is anything like mine you'll be constantly hitting hills, slowing for corners and accelerating out, chasing a mate who has just necked an extra energy gel... and in those situations that lack of weight results in instant responses.

The Mavic R-Sys SLR wheels help there. They're very lightweight at about 1,350g the pair (Mavic claim 1,295g) and they really don't flex much at all whatever you do to them. They're not as aerodynamically efficient as many other wheelsets out there but I still have a soft spot for them on the basis that they climb so fast... and that's usually where people will try to drop you given half a chance.

While I'm talking about the wheels, the rims come with Mavic's Exalith coating which is a treatment that's designed to increase the durability of the aluminium – allowing them to take off a few grams – and improve the braking performance. It's true that braking is excellent in both wet and dry conditions but I have to disagree with Mavic's claim that pad wear is the same as with other wheels. Initially at least, the grooved surface munched through our pads fast and they're £18 a pair to replace.

Anyway, back to the frame... It certainly feels like Canyon have retained all the stiffness of the previous Ultimate CF SLX that we tested, despite the drop in weight. That front end in particular feels absolutely solid even when you wind the bike up for a full Cav-esque sprint, and it's super-precise through the turns.

We had a couple of larger riders (14st +) take the bike for a spin and both were super-impressed by the lack of movement at the bottom bracket when pedalling hard out of the saddle. Pick the bike up and you think it'll bend all over the place in the breeze, never mind when you put a serious amount of power through the cranks, but that really isn't the case (there is a rider weight limit, but it's 120kg). This is one solid chassis.

The Canyon scores highly for comfort too. Well, one of the other guys reckoned he'd change the Selle Italia SLR saddle immediately if it was his, whereas it's probably my favourite saddle ever... proving once again that saddles are very much a matter of personal preference.

That aside, everyone who rode the Ultimate CF SLX agreed that it's a comfortable setup without too much vibration getting through to either your hands or your butt. As I said above, if you want more comfort you could always upgrade to Canyon's Flat Spring Post 2.0 seat post, or you could go for wider tyres than the 23mm Mavic Yksion Pros that come fitted.

Canyon offer the Ultimate CF SLX in 11 – count 'em – different builds, starting with the £2,589 Shimano Ultegra-equipped Ultimate CF SLX 7.0 and going up to the £5,439 9.0, available with either Shimano Dura-Ace Di2 or Campag Super Record EPS (the exact prices vary according to the sterling/Euro exchange rate).

As you can see, the 9.0SL comes with SRAM's top-level Red groupset throughout. It's 10-speed – the 2014 11-speed group isn't available yet – the cables routed internally. I won't go into a big discussion on SRAM Red because it's not really the deal breaker here. If you don't like the DoubleTap gear shifting, for example, you can just opt for a Shimano or a Campagnolo build. It is worth mentioning, though, that you can choose between a standard or a compact chainset and you can select the cassette that you want.

Unlike most brands, Canyon sell direct to the consumer rather than going through bike retailers. You go online, put in your order, and the bike gets delivered straight to you. This allows Canyon to cut out the margin that would usually be added by the bike shop, meaning lower prices, which is why the Ultimate CF SLX is able to compete with bikes that are much, much more expensive.

We recently reviewed the Merida Scultura SL Team, for example. We're not into 'testing by spreadsheet' here at road.cc - it's never, ever as simple as just totting up the value of the components – but it's worth mentioning that the Merida, with a SRAM Red groupset but with other components different to those of the Canyon, is priced at £6,000. As I said, it's not a direct comparison, but it does help illustrate the value for money you're getting with Canyon.

All in all, this is a superb bike: lightweight and responsive, rigid and efficient, and easy to handle. Of course, £3,700 is far from cheap but you'll do well to find a better race bike at this price.

Verdict

Fast-accelerating, sharp-handling and lightweight; you'll do well to find a better race bike at this price.

road.cc test report

Make and model: Canyon Ultimate CF SLX 9.0 SL

Size tested: Large

About the bike

State the frame and fork material and method of construction. List the components used to build up the bike.

It's a carbon-fibre monocoque using more ultra-high modulus carbon fibre than in the previous version.

Frame Canyon Ultimate CF SLX

Fork Canyon One One Four SLX

Headset Acros Ai-70 Fiber

Rear derailleur SRAM Red

Front derailleur SRAM Red

Shifters SRAM Red SL

Brake levers SRAM Red SL

Brakes SRAM Red

Hubs Mavic R-Sys SLR

Cassette SRAM CS XG-1090 10s (three options available)

Rims Mavic R-Sys SLR WTS

Tyres Mavic Pro SSC

Cranks SRAM Red Compact

Chainrings 50/34 or 53/39

Bottom Bracket SRAM Press-Fit GXP

Stem Ritchey WCS (31,8)

Handlebar Ritchey WCS EvoCurve Carbon matt

Saddle Selle Italia SLR Special Edition

Seatpost Canyon VCLS Post

Tell us what the bike is for, and who it's aimed at. What do the manufacturers say about it? How does that compare to your own feelings about the bike?

It's designed as a full-on race/sports bike.

This is Canyon's write-up: "A frame weighing just 790 g, an 8% stiffer head tube and an even stiffer bottom bracket: the new Ultimate CF SLX combines uncompromising thrust with supreme comfort. A further reduction in surface area has been achieved by increasing the radius at the tube transitions, the steering tube and the bottom bracket, and by reducing some of the tube diameters. Less material means less weight. The new dropouts on the fork and the frame are made entirely of carbon fibre, for a further significant weight reduction. You can count on us to scrutinise every single component before we agree to use it. The brand new SRAM Red is a case in point.

"It is a state-of-the-art lightweight champion, delivering peak performance, impressive speed and the trusted technological and ergonomic SRAM features. The high-end Mavic R-Sys SLR wheels with Wheel-Tyre system are genuine lightweights in their class, providing outstanding acceleration performance. The hard anodised aluminium braking surface (Exalith) reduces brake wear, allowing for thinner walls and scoring another victory in the battle of the scales. Super lightweight and impressively strong – the Ultimate CF SLX 9.0 SL is a born winner."

Frame and fork

Overall rating for frame and fork
 
9/10

Riding the bike

Rate the bike for efficiency of power transfer:
 
9/10
Rate the bike for acceleration:
 
9/10
Rate the bike for sprinting:
 
9/10
Rate the bike for high speed stability:
 
8/10
Rate the bike for cruising speed stability:
 
8/10
Rate the bike for low speed stability:
 
8/10
Rate the bike for flat cornering:
 
9/10
Rate the bike for cornering on descents:
 
9/10
Rate the bike for climbing:
 
9/10

The drivetrain

Rate the drivetrain for performance:
 
9/10
Rate the drivetrain for durability:
 
8/10
Rate the drivetrain for weight:
 
9/10
Rate the drivetrain for value:
 
8/10

Wheels and tyres

Rate the wheels and tyres for performance:
 
8/10
Rate the wheels and tyres for durability:
 
9/10
Rate the wheels and tyres for weight:
 
9/10
Rate the wheels and tyres for comfort:
 
6/10
Rate the wheels and tyres for value:
 
8/10

Controls

Rate the controls for performance:
 
9/10
Rate the controls for durability:
 
8/10
Rate the controls for weight:
 
9/10
Rate the controls for comfort:
 
8/10
Rate the controls for value:
 
8/10

Your summary

Did you enjoy riding the bike? Yes.

Would you consider buying the bike? Yes, definitely worthy of serious consideration.

Would you recommend the bike to a friend? Yes... and I have.

Rate the bike overall for performance:
 
9/10
Rate the bike overall for value:
 
9/10

Overall rating: 9/10

About the tester

Age: 41  Height: 190cm  Weight: 75kg

I usually ride:   My best bike is:

I've been riding for: Over 20 years  I ride: Most days  I would class myself as: Expert

I regularly do the following types of riding: time trialling, commuting, club rides, sportives, general fitness riding,

 

48 user comments

Latest 30 commentsNewest firstBest ratedAll

Imo when u get into that price range i would expect at least ui2

posted by issacforce [205 posts]
10th June 2013 - 21:43

43 Likes

issacforce wrote:
Imo when u get into that price range i would expect at least ui2

not everyone wants di2. i dont at all. would take the super record cable version of this instead.

posted by russyparkin [579 posts]
10th June 2013 - 22:30

44 Likes

issacforce wrote:
Imo when u get into that price range i would expect at least ui2

you can order the Ultegra Di2 version of this bike for £2919, but with the proven Ksyrium Elite wheels instead.

posted by Metjas [288 posts]
10th June 2013 - 22:55

55 Likes

Very pleased to read this review. Have an Ultegra di2 version on order since January. Some delays apparently with a manufacturing problem but should be here by the end of the month. Not as light as the SRAM red version but still a light bike. Looking forward to riding it soon. Just hope summer can hang on a bit longer!!

posted by Psycling [49 posts]
10th June 2013 - 23:30

45 Likes

Nick T wrote:
Some people spend £100 per week on restaurants and pub nights and no one would begrudge them doing that, yet when someone puts away that same £400 a month and buys one of these after 9 months of saving they're suddenly mental for spending that much on "just a bike".

Seriously people, this is a cycling website. I'm here because I'd rather have "just a bike" to show for my money rather than the hangovers and indigestion.

Speak for yourself, I personally would prefer to be hungover to buggery and taking one of these bad boys for a ride down to the shops for some more rennies.

Moon on a stick for me.

posted by farrell [1451 posts]
11th June 2013 - 0:10

42 Likes

This whole article and thread combined sounds like an advert, shocking.

Ah, but that was then

posted by Pitstone Peddler [104 posts]
11th June 2013 - 0:51

46 Likes

sounds like an advert because canyon made a bike and we rode it and thought it was really good? what do you suggest we do next time that happens?

Dave Atkinson's picture

posted by Dave Atkinson [7379 posts]
11th June 2013 - 8:30

59 Likes

Russyparkin. I no not eveyone wants di2, ihavevit and love it, would put it on my winter bike if it would fit but alas. The thing with di2 is if ur not mechicly minded (spelt wrong i no) and spend that kind of money di2 is the way to go once set up that it but if not then go for the mechanical dura ace or campag record, it was only my opinion in the end Wink

posted by issacforce [205 posts]
11th June 2013 - 9:59

47 Likes

I bought one of these last year (previous model obviously) and I love it.

It took a while to justify the money to the Mrs but I compared it to the £1000 wedding dress she was buying that she'd only wear for 12 hours and I've more than made the bike "good value for money" when compared to that! I also agree with the points saying that instead of spending £100 a week on going out (average night out in London), getting one of these bikes makes a lot more sense to me.

It's more bike than I'm ever going to need but I don't regret getting one even a little bit, I've seen a lot more expensive bikes being walked up hills by people on sportives!

I guess it comes down to priorities, if you are lucky enough to have a bit of spare disposable income, are disciplined enough to save it and you really want an amazing bike, you'll end up being able to buy one (this one) at some point! If you'd prefer an all inclusive holiday per year or to go our drinking two nights a week or to eat out every night, I guess it'll be harder.

Si

posted by sim1515 [137 posts]
11th June 2013 - 13:48

43 Likes

Last time I filled the car it cost me £80. THAT's insane, can easily offset the cost of a bike by not driving two tons of motorised vehicle around. I'm in a position where I do very little driving (which equals more riding, fantastic!).

Awesome bike judging by the review, looks great too. I think I'm about due a new steed... Wink

posted by spaceyjase [49 posts]
11th June 2013 - 18:19

47 Likes

I ordered one of these with ultegra spec at the beginning of May and payed on the required date by cash transfer at the bank, 24hrs later Canyon inform me there are delays in the frame manufacture and there will be another three weeks to wait. In the mean time they did thank me for being patient and sent a free Canyon scarf that i can look forward to wearing in November when its nice and cold again. No money, no bike, nice scarf and still waiting patiently Thinking

boffo's picture

posted by boffo [30 posts]
12th June 2013 - 9:27

1 Like

You can't argue with the value for money but It look's like just another Chinese carbon frame that could have any bike brands name written on it.

Tapered head tube- check.
Big down tube- check.
Press fit BB- check.
Skinny stays- check.

I can't see any mention of the warranty period on this frame in the review, extremely relevant with a frame weighing just 790 grams.

posted by Echo [4 posts]
12th June 2013 - 10:53

42 Likes

Echo wrote:
You can't argue with the value for money but It look's like just another Chinese carbon frame that could have any bike brands name written on it.

Tapered head tube- check.
Big down tube- check.
Press fit BB- check.
Skinny stays- check.

I can't see any mention of the warranty period on this frame in the review, extremely relevant with a frame weighing just 790 grams.

I guess it could be mistaken for a generic Chinese carbon frame in terms of looks but Canyon do make their own frames I believe and all the reviews of them seem impressed by the frame stiffness and responsiveness.

Even if you did go with a cheaper carbon frame, I think you'd be hard pushed to get the same spec components for much less money and you'd be on a sub-standard frame.

The frame warranty is 6 years I think.

Si

posted by sim1515 [137 posts]
12th June 2013 - 13:33

49 Likes

Warranty is 6 years.

posted by low-fi [29 posts]
12th June 2013 - 14:09

46 Likes

I'm surprised that Canyon make their own frames as even the big companies use third party manufacturers such a Martec.

Six years isn't too bad and with a bike of this price level will typically be onto it's second owner by then anyway, with no transferable warranty.

The likes of Cervelo, Trek, Specialized, Giant all offer a lifetime warranty and most without rider weight limits.

I'd like to see reviews where ultra light machines regardless of origin are stripped and weighed to see how much real World variation there is between a press release and actual weight.

posted by Echo [4 posts]
12th June 2013 - 15:42

43 Likes

sim1515 wrote:
It took a while to justify the money to the Mrs but I compared it to the £1000 wedding dress she was buying that she'd only wear for 12 hours and I've more than made the bike "good value for money" when compared to that!

Out of interest, how much milage can you get out of the Wedding dress/VFM thing? I'm getting married myself in August.

posted by farrell [1451 posts]
12th June 2013 - 15:56

48 Likes

farrell wrote:
sim1515 wrote:
It took a while to justify the money to the Mrs but I compared it to the £1000 wedding dress she was buying that she'd only wear for 12 hours and I've more than made the bike "good value for money" when compared to that!

Out of interest, how much milage can you get out of the Wedding dress/VFM thing? I'm getting married myself in August.

Haha, I made the argument that £1000 for 12 hours works out we were paying £83.33 per hour for the dress and it would make her very happy for that day. I then said that it would only take 2 months of cycling (5 hours a week) to make the bike better value (I paid around £3,300) and this would make me happy every ride I go on.

We pool our wages and pay for everything out of a shared pot which included the wedding (and the dress), she still found it hard to justify even though the wedding cost a lot more than the bike. I then made the point that I work hard for a living and contribute a lot to our savings, what would be the point in me doing that if I don't get to spend at least some of it on something I'd enjoy, for a lot longer than our wedding day and costing far less. Whilst no very romantic, she seemed to buy this line after a while so effectively she got a nice dress and her big day, I got a nice bike, good deal!

Congrats by the way!

Si

posted by sim1515 [137 posts]
12th June 2013 - 16:43

46 Likes

Canyon's frames are made in China, or Taiwan, but the bikes are assembled and all quality checks/tests done in Koblenz, including checking the carbon lay ups internally, with their CT scanner. They told me so when I spoke to them at their stand at the London Bike show. It didn't stop me from ordering one, as it's no different than pretty much every other brand I've looked at.

Ideal Bike Corp, Fairly Bike, Advanced International Multitech, Ten Tech Composites, and Giant, make frames for a lot of the major brands. These include BMC, Fuji, Felt, Willier, Bianchi, Dedacciai, Look, Specialized, Trek, Scott, Colnago, Giant (obviously), Cervelo, and Ridley. Apart from the really hi-end framesets, all of these brands' frames are made in China or Taiwan.

If you want full custom carbon from Cyfac, Parlee etc. you can have it made in Europe or the States, but it can cost as much as this whole bike.

ESMMH

posted by Paul Madden [8 posts]
12th June 2013 - 18:07

30 Likes

Does the specified weight only apply to this paint job? Would the black and white weigh more? If so, does anyone know how much?

posted by beanzo [3 posts]
14th June 2013 - 14:28

36 Likes

Are you serious mate?

posted by DeanF316 [91 posts]
14th June 2013 - 19:21

36 Likes

About to order one of these with either Ultegra Di2 or Dura Ace mechanical but which to go for. Has anyone seen anything about new Ultegra Di2 for 2014?

Bit concerned about some of the delay issues. Is this a common problem as delivery dates quoted for Dura Ace models creeping towards autumn?

posted by Funnyboy [3 posts]
16th June 2013 - 8:16

25 Likes

Funnyboy wrote:
About to order one of these with either Ultegra Di2 or Dura Ace mechanical but which to go for. Has anyone seen anything about new Ultegra Di2 for 2014?

Bit concerned about some of the delay issues. Is this a common problem as delivery dates quoted for Dura Ace models creeping towards autumn?

Mine arrived on Friday. I also ummed and ahhed about whether to go for Ultegra Di2, or Mechanical Dura Ace. In the end I went for Dura Ace, for two reasons. One, I figured that the electronic groupsets are still evolving, and will no doubt improve massively over the next couple of iterations, getting lighter and smaller, whereas the mechanical groupsets are kind of at the pinnacle of development, so they really are the best they can be right now (all the reviews seem to say so too). The second reason is, it's flippin' Dura Ace!

ESMMH

posted by Paul Madden [8 posts]
17th June 2013 - 12:04

32 Likes

Paul Madden wrote:
Funnyboy wrote:
About to order one of these with either Ultegra Di2 or Dura Ace mechanical but which to go for. Has anyone seen anything about new Ultegra Di2 for 2014?

Bit concerned about some of the delay issues. Is this a common problem as delivery dates quoted for Dura Ace models creeping towards autumn?

Mine arrived on Friday. I also ummed and ahhed about whether to go for Ultegra Di2, or Mechanical Dura Ace. In the end I went for Dura Ace, for two reasons. One, I figured that the electronic groupsets are still evolving, and will no doubt improve massively over the next couple of iterations, getting lighter and smaller, whereas the mechanical groupsets are kind of at the pinnacle of development, so they really are the best they can be right now (all the reviews seem to say so too). The second reason is, it's flippin' Dura Ace!

Congratulations...but don't keep us in suspense, what are your first impressions? Is it all that you expected of it? You have ridden it haven't you??

posted by ronin [140 posts]
20th June 2013 - 17:45

32 Likes

Well I took the plunge and ordered a dura ace mechanical version rather than Di2, not sure about the Ksyrium Elite wheels though. Sure they are great but may go for some Dura Ace C24's or Filcrum Zeros (dark label may be ideal with the stealth finish). Got a delivery date of week 30 which is two weeks earlier than stated but will see.

For those critics out there I have spoken to Canyon UK and had prompt replies to emails. I know what I'm doing with bikes, with this 3k budget I would get nowhere near this spec from my LBS. Dura Ace equipped bikes are way more than this from the likes of Scott, Giant etc etc.

posted by Funnyboy [3 posts]
24th June 2013 - 8:00

34 Likes

I got mine with Dura ace mech a week ago, it is a dream. I can't believe how solid it is in comparison to it weight. It s a beast, cannot recommend it enough the quality is unreal. I have improved my timing, stepping up from 5,6,7 positions on strava to KOMs,2 and 3rd unreal? Love it, krysium wheel are solid. The frame being carbon makes a lovely noise when going into a head wind

posted by Steviel [0 posts]
25th June 2013 - 21:25

34 Likes

Trust me this is not a normal Chinese frame, the quality, feel and handling is a dream. It does what you mind wants it too

posted by Steviel [0 posts]
25th June 2013 - 21:28

32 Likes

I'm not usually one for posting on forums, but... I pre-ordered one of these as a frameset last December on the reviews of the previous model. It arrived a couple of weeks ago and I built it up with record 11speed.
The bike comes in at 6.05kg with pedals, admittedly with very light wheels!
All I can say is that I have never ridden anything as good as this. The cliches are all relevant about stiff plus comfort, light yet strong etc etc.
There are a couple of things worth considering in a purchase. On the plus, it is a bargain compared to the competition and a healthy discount is given if you can show proof of having a race licence, so it cost me ~£1400.
The only downside is that your local bike shop will go out of business if we all embrace this business model. No distributors or retailers margins allow the price to be so low. To compensate, the Canyon UK service is great, very helpful with parts advice exchanges etc.

posted by scotspete [1 posts]
28th June 2013 - 13:35

31 Likes

Amazing bike - I recently had the mechanical Dura Ace version delivered and having ridden the previous CF SLX for two tears I can confirm that this latest version is a huge step up in both stiffness and comfort. Again, as said before, and I have spent a lot of time looking at all the options out there, there is no way one can get quality like this for a comparable price with any other manufacturer. Remember, when Canyon says it's a Dura Ace build, you get Dura Ace down to the brake pads, no short cuts with Ultegra/105 bits thrown in where you least expect it - other makes, you know who you are!

And as for my LBS, they have had plenty of business out of me with regular servicing of my bikes etc, so I feel I'm still very well connected to the guys in the shop.

posted by Metjas [288 posts]
21st October 2013 - 20:19

30 Likes

Interesting so many people have gone for the dura ace, I was trying to weigh up which one to go for. Either the dura ace or ultegra di2 and upgrade the wheels to c24's.

The only thing I can find that comes close to at cf slx is a Planet X n2a with dura ace di2 from Merlin, or a mondo from px with dura ace mechanical,

I think the canyon will be better though, anyone got any thoughts?

Lbs was trying to give me a r3 with tiagra groupset and similar wheels err, no.

posted by Yetim [1 posts]
2nd November 2013 - 14:03

23 Likes

Comparable to an S-works SL4 for ride? Obv lifetime Warranty with Specialized but the price difference in Framesets at first glance is attractive

posted by Tommy1088 [9 posts]
8th December 2013 - 10:01

22 Likes

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