Hutchinson Intensive Road Tubeless tyres  £56.99

8/10

Great tyres for autumn, winter and early spring rides, giving a secure, comfortable ride, and should prove highly puncture resistant. But if you do get a flat, you'll need a good back-up plan

Weight 353g   Contact  www.extrauk.co.uk

by David Else   March 14, 2012  

Hutchinson Intensive Road Tubeless tyres

Hutchinson Intensive Road tubeless tyres are excellent off-season tyres, offering a good ride and decent puncture resistance.

Tubeless tyres have been around in the mountain bike world for a few years, but are still new territory for road bikes. Hutchinson is one of several manufacturers adopting the new technology, with tubeless-specific options including the lightweight Atom and the mid-weight Fusion. Recently added to the collection is the Intensive, a heavier tyre designed for rough roads in both wet and dry conditions.

The Intensives are size 700x25c and have a Kevlar puncture resistant strip under the tread. They're not light, with an advertised weight of 320g and coming in around 350g on the road.cc scales - but that's still a pretty reasonable weight for winter tyres. And don't forget, when comparing the weight of a tubeless tyre against a normal tyre, you can deduct the weight of an inner tube (80-120g depending what you ride), although you do need to add a bit for the liquid latex sealant solution that goes in the tyre (20g - more on this later).

But before going any further, a clarification might be called for. When we say tubeless tyres, we mean clincher tyres that fit straight onto the rim with NO inner tube. This is totally different to tubular tyres.

All clear? Right. On we go...

To test these tyres, we fitted them to a pair of tubeless-specific Fulcrum Racing 3 wheels, and it was not a straightforward job. Firstly because tubeless tyres by their very nature need to be a tight fit to get the airtight seal between tyre bead and inner rim, and secondly because the internal section of the rim on the Fulcrum 3 is a different shape to a normal clincher wheel, with a well that's narrow and shallow. The first bead of the Intensive went on the wheel okay, and then most of the second bead was okay too, but the last few inches of the second bead was a bugger to get over the rim, even with a dash of washing up liquid (as per instruction leaflet) to help lube it over.

But once on the rim, the beads of the Intensive flexed outwards enough to contact the rim all round, and pumped up first time using a track pump. There was no need for any sealant solution to plug the gaps, or for C02 canisters to supply a big rush of air to force the tyre to make first contact with the rim.

At first, the tyres did not align perfectly on the rims, and showed a bit of side-to-side and up-and-down wobble. But that was easily sorted. Dropping the pressure to about 40psi meant they could be gripped in the palms of both hands and twisted slightly to sit nice and straight.

Next, we pumped the tyres up to their maximum recommended 115psi. Although the packaging promised 700x25, the road.cc callipers had the width a tad under 24mm when fitted to the Fulcrum 3s.

To test the tyres' airtight qualities, we left them on the wheels overnight. After eight hours, the pressure in the front tyre had dropped to 70psi, while the back was at 95psi. Not ideal, and more investigation was needed. But the sun was shining, so we pumped the tyres back up to 100, put the wheels in a bike, and went for a ride. After four hours, over some pretty rough roads, they'd dropped to the same 70/95psi.

Why the front was dropping more than the rear was initially a mystery, but when cleaning off the bike after the ride, the tyres got wet and small air bubbles appeared on the surface of the front tyre, between the tread and the sidewall, rather than between the tyre and rim as you might expect.

It was time to break out the latex.

Most tubeless tyre manufacturers recommend using latex solution in tubeless tyres. It goes in the tyre as a liquid but it solidifies when it's squeezed outwards through a small hole, so it helps seal the tyre to the bead when fitting. So we removed the valve cores and poured 20ml of latex solution into each tyre, spun the wheels, then pumped them up to 100psi and left them overnight again.

Eight hours later they'd lost 5psi each. The latex seemed to be doing the trick.

But just to be sure, another test ride was called for. So off we went on a long jaunt through the Peak District. Covering a little under 100 miles in around seven hours, riding over some very bumpy roads, the tyres had dropped by just 5psi once more. The latex was definitely making a difference.

Now the Intensives were holding their pressure, we were able to assess their performance. Fitted to the tubeless-specific Fulcrum 3s, and running at 100psi, they rolled along very nicely, inspiring confidence, with a feel comparable to a good set of clinchers or even heavy tubs at a slightly higher pressure. The lack of an inner tube allowed the tyre to be at a lower pressure, which meant more grip and comfort on rough winter roads, but without the tyres feeling sloppy, which meant less energy wasted.

So far, so good. But although the ride quality was great, it wasn't THAT different to a set of normal good quality clinchers. Which begs the question: Why change to tubeless?

Apart from ride quality, the main benefit is less chance of getting punctures. With no inner tube, snakebites are impossible, while objects such thorns effectively plug the hole they've made, so air escapes more slowly – a definite benefit, as anyone who's suffered a sudden blowout, especially on a descent, will tell you. And with latex solution inside tyres, the holes are quickly and automatically filled and mended - often without you even noticing.

But if you slice your tyre on a large piece of glass or flint and get a real flat, things start to get tricky. Theoretically, in emergency situations, tubes can be fitted inside a tubeless tyre, but reality proved somewhat different.

First we had to get one side of the tyre off, and it was pretty tight. Some tubeless wheel manufacturers recommend not using tyre levers when removing or fitting tyres but we found this impossible and resorted to plastic levers so as not to damage the rim. After snapping two levers we finally got one side of the tyre off, and promptly got our hands sticky as the latex solution escaped.

Taking the second bead off the wheel was easier, although we had to take the valve out of the rim, which was also wedged in pretty tight.

Then we refitted an Intensive with an inner tube in the usual way, which was a very tough job, but just about possible without tyre levers - but with a lot of straining. And all this was in the road.cc workshop. Doing it at the side of the road would be a nightmare.

But once fitted, it was impossible to get the Intensive tyre seated properly on the rim. It wobbled from side to side, and up and down. No amount of gripping, twisting and swearing would straighten it.

Fitting an inner tube in an emergency might be easier with different brands of tubeless tyre or with different brands of tubeless wheel, or with tubeless tyres on non-tubeless rims converted using a kit, but successfully fitting an Intensive tyre and inner tube on a Fulcrum 3 tubeless rim was impossible.

So can we recommend these tyres? Yes, as tyres, the Intensives are very good. They roll along nicely, and are very sturdy, with good grip and comfort, and resistant to (let's say) 99% of punctures. If you've already embraced tubeless, then these tyres are a great option for autumn, winter and early spring riding.

But if you're the sort of cyclist that worries about that 1% when you might be stuck far from home with a flat you can't fix, then these tyres are best avoided.

Verdict

Great tyres for autumn, winter and early spring rides, giving a secure, comfortable ride, and should prove highly puncture resistant. But if you do get a flat, you'll need a good back-up plan.

road.cc test report

Make and model: Hutchinson Intensive Road Tubeless tyres

Size tested: n/a

Tell us what the product is for, and who it's aimed at. What do the manufacturers say about it? How does that compare to your own feelings about it?

The website of Extra UK (Hutchinson's UK distributor) has this to say about the Intensives: 'The performance of the Fusion tyre concept but in an ultra long distance version incorporating 'Hardskin' technology to resist cuts and perforations without loss of comfort or power.'

The claims about resisting cuts is true, as is the claim about comfort. However, weighing about 30-60g more than the Fusion, there will inevitably be a minor impact on the power you transmit from pedalling to moving the wheel along the road, but this is a payoff most riders will be prepared to take if it means less chance of punctures.

Tell us some more about the technical aspects of the product?

The Extra UK website emphasises two key tech features:

* Kevlar-Protech puncture protection

* Thermoplastic reinforced gum improves longevity and performance without decreasing grip

Rate the product for quality of construction:
 
7/10

The rubber compound of the tread and sidewalls seem fine, with no cuts evident after some our first few test-rides on some pretty rough roads. The strange apparant leaking out of the front tyre knocks a point off, although this was easily fixed with the latex solution.

Rate the product for performance:
 
9/10

The tyres inspire confidence on winter roadfs, rolling along very nicely, with a feel comparable to a good set of clinchers or even heavy tubs at a slightly higher pressure. The lack of an inner tube allowed the tyre to be at a lower pressure, which meant more grip and comfort on rough winter roads, but without the tyres feeling sloppy, which meant less energy wasted.

Rate the product for durability:
 
8/10

Judging by the first 200 miles or so, these tyres are strong and durable.

Rate the product for weight, if applicable:
 
8/10

Each tyre's advertised wight is 320g, although we found them nearer 350g on the road.cc scales. Still not a bad weight for a winter tyre, and very good indeed when you remember the weight of the inner tube can be deducted. Weight weenies will need to consider the extra 20g of latex solution, plus of course a valve. But no rim tape....

Rate the product for comfort, if applicable:
 
8/10

The tyres give a comfortable ride, as mentioned under 'Performance'.

Rate the product for value:
 
7/10

The Hutchinson Intensive's recommended retail price is a penny under £57. If you're a tubeless evangelist, you'll say this is a fair price. If you're still a doubter, then this may be another aspect of tubeless to put you off making the switch.

Tell us what you particularly liked about the product

Comfortable, conmfidence-inspiring ride on winter roads

Tell us what you particularly disliked about the product

Fitting and removing. Fear of punctures far from home.

Did you enjoy using the product? Yes. Definitetly. Very impressed with comfort and ride quality.

Would you consider buying the product? Personally, no. The spectre of a serious (and irreparable) flat tyre, far from home, puts me off.

Would you recommend the product to a friend? Yes, if they've already embraced tubeless.

Anything further to say about the product in conclusion?

As tubeless technology on road bikes is still a relatively new phenomenon, it's tricky to separate specific comments about the Intensive tyres from more general comments about tubeless tyres as a whole. I have tried as far as possible to focus on my experience riding (and fitting/removing) the Intensives. Other riders may have other views – especially on options for repairing punctures and getting home without having to phone a buddy or understanding spouse for a lift.

Overall rating: 8/10

About the tester

Age: 50  Height: 5ft 10 / 178cm  Weight: 11 stone / 70kg

I usually ride: an old Marin Alp   My best bike is: an old Giant Cadex

I've been riding for: Over 20 years  I ride: A few times a week  I would class myself as: Experienced

I regularly do the following types of riding: touring, club rides, sportives, general fitness riding,

 

19 user comments

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Interesting that you had so much trouble getting a tube in. I guess that, as usual, different combinations of tyre and rim will yield different results. I had the Hutchinson Fusion tubless on a Dura Ace C24 tubeless rim, and didnt have any problems fitting a tube by the side of the road when the liquid latex finally ran out on a couple of occasions (usually only after several punctures in a ride).

That said, I had a lot more trouble getting my tyres to seal when initially fitting them - which I suppose is consistent with that combo being a looser fit.

I've now gone back to ordinary clinchers after spending too long trying to fit new tyres or to reseal them when refitting them (after punctures requiring a tube)- I'm still torn about whether to revisit the tubeless experiment, as the ride feel was great and the liquid latex worked brilliantly most of the time.

Has anyone tried using the liquid latex in ordinary inner tubes?

posted by step-hent [675 posts]
14th March 2012 - 11:37

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Yep. Thought I'd experiment as had ordered some new wheels with Stan's rims and was 50/50 as to whether to go tubeless. So I stuck some liquid latex in the commuter bike tubes and rode to work. 30 mins later there was a "pssst" and an spray of white fluid all over the frame that put me in mind of John Hurt in Alien. In short, it didn't work. So I've stuck with regular clinchers and haven't regretted it.

posted by Rushie [34 posts]
14th March 2012 - 14:36

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Rushie wrote:
Yep. Thought I'd experiment as had ordered some new wheels with Stan's rims and was 50/50 as to whether to go tubeless. So I stuck some liquid latex in the commuter bike tubes and rode to work. 30 mins later there was a "pssst" and an spray of white fluid all over the frame that put me in mind of John Hurt in Alien. In short, it didn't work. So I've stuck with regular clinchers and haven't regretted it.

Ah, thanks. Good to know it isn't worth trying! I'm sticking with clinchers for the time being too.

posted by step-hent [675 posts]
14th March 2012 - 15:50

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Thanks for these comments, guys. I think you’re right: a lot comes down to the combination of tubeless tyre and tubeless rim. If it’s tight enough to fit as tubeless, it’s too hard to get a tube in. If it’s easy to get a tube in, it’s too sloppy to fit as tubeless.

When the manufacturers perfect the technology (easy to fit and remove tyre in tubeless mode, AND easy to fit a tube at the side of the road in case of emergency), combined with the anti-puncture benefits mentioned in the review, then I think it’ll make going tubeless much more enticing.

David Else

posted by David Else [284 posts]
14th March 2012 - 23:14

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Am I missing something here? They are difficult to fit (needed washing up liquid, liquid latex and a serious amount of time to be sure they fitted properly), difficult to remove (two broken tyre levers, latex mess), and you still need to carry a spare inner tube in case of puncture - which probably won't fit very well.

Oh, and in order to experience all these joys you need to buy a new set of rims

Fitted a new set of tyres last night using good old fashioned inner tubes, took my time and had the job done in 15 minutes, and you know what, I didn't even have to check tyre pressures today to check that I had done the job properly.

Tubeless unquestionably have a place in the mtb world, where grip and low pressures can go together, resulting in snakebite punctures, but if snakebite punctures are a regular problem on your road bike, you are probably running them at too low a pressure.

posted by FMOAB [230 posts]
15th March 2012 - 2:41

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How to use a tubeless
Good grief, I swear every time there's an article about tubeless, I get the impression that the writers are paid by the manufacturers of inner tubes. Tubeless are just not that difficult. MTFU. I've been riding them for three years with few problems; Hutchinson Fusions on Campag Shamal Ultra 2 Way Fit. I use them for everything; for sportives/the etape/L2P I use the 21mm 'Atoms'; for general I use the 23mm versions. This winter, because it was so icy, I found an old Conti 4 Season 25mm clincher in my pile, swapped the valves, put in an inner tube. Simples. I don't know why forums are full of babies whining about how hard they are to put on, what's the matter with you? Get some proper levers or use the old metal ones you still have in a draw somewhere. Put a tyre on any old wheel to stretch it a bit before you need it. You can't put them on with just your hands? Well, not being brought up on a farm or down a mine, I can't put ANY tyre on with just my hands. Or my teeth. Unless you are a neanderthal, why aren't you using a tool?
Inflating; its. Just. Not. That. Hard. I use a track pump, I've never had any problem. I've never needed the soapy water trick or Co2. A compressor and air line? I live in a two bed flat not a Kwikfit
Seating the tyre: Pump them up very high (115psi) let them down to 40 and then pump them up again to ride pressure. I think that would work but in since I've never had a seating problem, what do I know?
Re-inflating; its. Just. Not. That. Hard. How do people check their tyre pressures before they ride, by giving it a squeeze? Poking it with your toe? I don't, I use a gauge and the only one I have is on my track pump. The tubeless are always low (so what!) so whilst checking them I top them up. It takes seconds.
Repairs; Just. Not. That. Hard. I get about one puncture a year. The author above makes a song and dance about inserting an inner tube following a tear in the tyre. What on earth are you doing? You patch/boot a tubeless from the inside! Don't put in a tube. The interior pressure keeps the patch on (rather than forcing it off your inner tube repair), you barely need glue.

I use tubeless because they're supple, light, and a comfy but swift ride (at 90/100psi on a 68kg rider). They're not perfect, nor are inner tubes. I carry glue/patches/boots (the pre-glued thin and the unglued thick kind), Co2, a tiny pump for dire emergencies (unused so far) and a spare tubeless valve and (very important) the little tool for removing the valve. I don't carry any inner tubes. I don't use the latex gloop - I don't mind pumping up tyres for each ride and it makes patching the inside slippery and difficult. If I did use latex, I'd probably carry one of the little sachets with a wipe they give you with your meal on the plane. If I go away for a week or two I pack an old tyre that's been pre-stretched
Very slow pressure loss is not a problem; I don't do many 9 hour rides (do you?) The 23mm Hutchinsons could be lighter but I rarely get punctures. I use the 'Atoms' for anything serious. I carry enough cash to get home from the furthest point of my ride and an app on my iPhone that tells me where's the nearest station.

I've never had a snake bite and I'll say one thing about the author above's tear puncture - I'd rather have the safety of a few seconds that my tubeless takes to deflate than the catastrophic and instantaneous blow-out the same puncture would have given had they been on an inner tube. I imagine the slightly beefier tubeless rim dissipates heat from long descents better too - anyone considered that? And your latex 40g inner tube goes down over night too. Or you're carrying an extra 90g of rotating weight at the rim with an inner tube? And your carrying two 90g inner tubes because they're unreliable and get nicks in your saddle bag or upon installation (but you spent £40 to save 12g on a lighter bottle cage???). Ever had an inner tube with a faulty valve, I have. Etc. etc etc.

I'm test driving some cheap tubulars at the moment; risky business without my usual support car behind me (joke!) but I can't say that they're a whole lot better than my tubeless set-up. What I can say is that on a hired bike with clinchers and inner tubes in Mallorca last month, I cornered like I was on my tubelesses and went into a wall (and then an ambulance and then a hospital)

Blogs are full of groovy new technologies for us to slather over, but when a simple new idea comes along, half of you retreat to the back of the cave grunting and waving a burning stick. I despair.

posted by Default Username [5 posts]
15th March 2012 - 10:42

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Quote:
I can't put ANY tyre on with just my hands. Or my teeth. Unless you are a neanderthal, why aren't you using a tool?

I can put on most tyres with my hands. it's not about strength, it's about technique.

David's point is that the techniques that work for tubed tyres aren't so effective because of the different shape of a rim well. although it's not such an issue with tubeless as the main reason not to use a tool is to avoid pinching the tube.

Quote:
Inflating; its. Just. Not. That. Hard. I use a track pump, I've never had any problem

great that you've never had a problem, but in my experience some tubeless tryes won't seat without a Co2 inflator, normally because they've been folded and kinked in the packaging. a track pump doesn't always work. Sorry if you think I need to MTFU here, but it's true.

Quote:
Blogs are full of groovy new technologies for us to slather over, but when a simple new idea comes along, half of you retreat to the back of the cave grunting and waving a burning stick. I despair.

hm. that's not really what's happening here, is it? David's (fairly even handed IMO) review is simply saying that tubeless is a useful technology that hasn't quite matured yet. i can't really see what's so awful about that

Dave Atkinson's picture

posted by Dave Atkinson [7323 posts]
15th March 2012 - 11:28

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Quote:
Hutchinson is one of several manufacturers adopting the new technology, with tubeless-specific options including the lightweight Atom and the mid-weight Fusion.

Slightly weasel words. There are many wheel manufacturers, but Hutchinson are the only tyre manufacturer I know of. And they've had an "Intensive" for years - I guess this is a new version of it.

Quote:
poured 20mg of latex solution into each tyre

I think you mean 20 ml!

When you found that the tyres were loosing 5 psi, are you sure that loss wasn't just from re-attaching the track pump and losing air into its hose? ie: Do you loose 5 psi if you pump up to 100, disconnect and reconnect the pump?

I'd like to try road tubeless, but I'm worried that after six years it still hasn't caught on. This is in contrast to MTB tubeless tyres, which have been a huge success.

two wheels good; four wheels bad

posted by cat1commuter [1339 posts]
15th March 2012 - 19:00

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Very interesting test. I have had Fusion 3s (23mm and 23mm nominal) on Shamals for nearly 3 years. One puncture. Recently have Atoms (20mm but 23mm nominal) fitted to Shimano Ultegras. The back wheels always seem to go straight up and the fronts need co2 and latex. The repair is patch and superglue! Fantastic smooth comfy ride. Cannot recommend them enough. Try them you won't go back.

posted by lowbridges [4 posts]
15th March 2012 - 19:26

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cat1commuter wrote:
Slightly weasel words. There are many wheel manufacturers, but Hutchinson are the only tyre manufacturer I know of.

Maxxis. Bontrager.

posted by Mat Brett [1865 posts]
15th March 2012 - 21:04

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Mat Brett wrote:
cat1commuter wrote:
Slightly weasel words. There are many wheel manufacturers, but Hutchinson are the only tyre manufacturer I know of.

Maxxis. Bontrager.

The Bontrager is made for them by Hutchinson. The Fusion 3 carcass with Bontrager specified tread. Specialized have a rebadged Fusion 3 too.

I didn't know about the Maxxis. Their "Padrone" does appear to be a different tyre, since it costs roughly twice the Hutchisons at £90.

two wheels good; four wheels bad

posted by cat1commuter [1339 posts]
16th March 2012 - 0:41

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In responding to the article I should have mentioned that I thought that the article itself was among the strongest I have read. I found it to be a balanced piece on the author's personal experience of using the product, with real effort put into the test itself and the subsequent review.

posted by FMOAB [230 posts]
16th March 2012 - 11:35

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Fair point, cat1commuter. The 5psi loss may well have been due to attaching and removing the pump. And yes - 20ml. Slip of the keyboard. I have changed the unit in the main article.

On the topic of tyre levers, just to clarify: The reason not to use levers when fitting conventional clinchers is that they might pinch the tube. (I never need levers to fit tyres - despite a non-agricultural upbringing.) The reason given by the manufacturers for not using levers on tubeless is that they might damage the rim and/or tyre bead and hinder the airtight seal. However, I'm very open to more opinion on this from regular tubeless users.

David Else

posted by David Else [284 posts]
16th March 2012 - 11:46

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tubeless seems to be a solution for a problem that doesnt exist.

at the lbs the mechanic blew a tubeless on an mtb to bits fitting it, huge bang and he was covered in latex. hilarious.

anyway.. the weight is no better and if it does get a big cut its f==ked, where as if you get a puncture on a proper set up you have a hope of getting home.

posted by russyparkin [579 posts]
16th March 2012 - 22:26

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I have been using road tubeless now for 3 years with 2 different wheel sets and 2 different types of tires. I have a set of Fulcrum Racing Zero 2-Ways and a Set of Shimano WH-7850-SLs. I use both Hutchinson Fusion 2/3 and Hutchinson Piranha CXs.

I have never had a flat that kept me from getting home. Period. All I carry with me is a can of Hutchinson Fast'Air (fix-a-flat for the bike) and have only had to use it twice, any other punctures have self-sealed. Again, I have never been left stranded. Additionally I have had far fewer punctures with tubeless tires than I ever did with tube tires.

From my experience tubeless tires hold air pressure far better than inner tubes. If you are riding with inner tubes and not checking your tire pressure daily, I would suggest you reconsider your practices. I have never had an inner tube tire that didn't need checking everyday, and usually needed a few extra PSI everyday. My Fusion 3s on the other hand, I am comfortable with not even checking for a whole week of riding. To me, this is a benefit. Some people have said that tubeless means more time with a pump, from my experience, it means less.

These tires are fast! My father and I were riding together, its a steep descent. We are both riding premium bikes with premium wheels and tires but I am tubeless and he is using tubes. I am literally on the brakes while he is pedaling to keep up. No joke, tubeless is fast. You don't believe me, ride them.

Mounting tubeless tires: Sometimes I need tools to mount tubeless tires. I usually needed tools to mount tube tires too though. I have owned tire levers as long as I have been biking, so I am not surprised that I need to use them sometimes. As I am getting more used to the tubeless tires, I find myself using the tire levers less as I adopt new techniques for these tires. When mounting new tires, I can always get road sized tires (700x23) to seat with just a standard floor pump, no problems. For CX tires (700x34) I need to use a CO2 cartridge of compressor. No big deal, the CX tires have a lot of volume to fill with air.

I have successfully patched many flats by booting the inside of the tire and then remounting it. Its just like a car tire.

Finally, getting a flat on a tubeless tire is no big deal usually. Tube tires go flat right away. Tubeless tires flat slowly, you know whats going on and have time to react and stop safely to check out the situation. I have gotten flats and not even realized it. I have gotten home looked at my tire and thought, wow, it looks kind of low, check the tread, found a hole plugged with sealant check the pressure found it to be at 65-70 psi (on a 700x23 tire) and realized I had had a significant puncture and not even noticed. I hadn't even noticed the bike get harder to pedal when the tire lost pressure down to 65 psi. I then re-inflated the tire and it held pressure just fine and I continued to ride on it.

Bottom line: I love the tubeless tires. For me they are fast, reliable, safe, and comfortable. I wouldn't hesitate to buy them again. I haven't hesitated to buy them again. I have 2 tubeless wheelsets and a third one on the way. I just don't want to see what I feel is good technology get a bad rap.

posted by timdavis130 [1 posts]
28th March 2012 - 19:47

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Don't get me wrong. I'm happy to embrace good new technology, and I would also ride tubeless all the time, for all the reasons you mention (safe, fast, light, comfortable, reliable), if it wasn't for the emergency repair situation.

Personally, I can't help worrying about that rare occasion when the tyre gets such a big cut that it doesn't self-seal, and repair with a boot (or fitting an inner tube) is either difficult or impossible at the side of the road.fter

Having said that, I met a guy after the finish of the Paris-Roubaix Challenge who’d been riding tubeless Hutchinson Intensives. He had some interesting comments:

1. He punctured. Twice. Both tyres. Both times with cuts to the sidewall.
2. He repaired them by putting in an inner-tube, which was “as easy as fitting a tube in a normal clincher”.
3. He was riding a mix of Mavic rims - in the front an Equipe with tubeless converter tape, and in the back an Elite to which tubeless tyres can be fitted direct because there are no spoke-holes.
4. He rides Dura Ace tubeless wheels at home, and can also fit inter-tubes easily in these in case of emergency repair.

As mentioned in my review, it seems part of the struggle I had with fitting a tube in the Hutchinsons was because they were combined with the Fulcrum 3s.

With other brands of wheel such as Mavic or Dura Ace, or with normal clinchers and a converter kit, it might be a different story.

David Else

posted by David Else [284 posts]
5th April 2012 - 15:02

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I'm using Hutchinson Intensive Tubeless (nice going Hutchinson - having the identical name for two different tyres - order and pray you get the right one) on Shimano Ultegra wheels.

The fit is tight - I can't imagine mounting them without at least one lever. I've never attempted trying to fit a tube inside, but I did have one large gash that sealed well enough to get home. The tyre wouldn't hold more than 80 psi after that, so I had to remove and patch it.

Ride your own ride

posted by CanAmSteve [126 posts]
20th November 2012 - 15:19

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This is an old post but this comment is relevant.

I bought a pair of these on the strength of this review. A big mistake; On country roads, after rain they lasted not five miles before a flint did for them - one large hole and a large gouge later, the rear needs replacing.

So whats it to be - specialized armadillo elites, gator skins or racing tyres with Mr tuffy lightweight liners.
Angry

To slo to live, to slo to die! ::-}

posted by OldnSlo [125 posts]
31st May 2013 - 22:28

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If I had a team car (with a mechanic!) to follow me everywhere I'd use tubs, that beautiful smooth fast rolling feeling can't be beaten. But I don't so I use the next best thing...tubeless.
Fusion 3 on Durace C24 tubeless specific have worked very well for me. Do use latex and don't worry about having to use levers to get them on (use a smear of latex as a fitting lubricant). I carry a tube as a spare but haven't had to use it in about 5k miles.
I too had a leaky one like David described and like him fiddled to try to get it to work, I shouldn't have bothered, it's clearly faulty and needs exchanging. They blow up easily with a track pump.
I'm very happy for you to stay with tubes, I need every advantage I can get. What happened to OldnSlo would have finished any tyre, it's not a tubeless problem per se.

posted by SRRC [2 posts]
24th June 2013 - 14:18

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