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Verdict: 
Cycling-specific jeans that look good and are comfortable on and off the bike
Weight: 
564g
Endura Urban Jean
8 10

Endura's Urban jeans do what they say on the tin: they are jeans designed for cycling in. They work, they're very comfortable and I like them a lot. I'm not sure there's much more to say about them… Oh, go on then.

  • Pros: Seam-free gusset, discreet reflectives, fit
  • Cons: Umm...

There are a few things that make these jeans cycle-friendly. Most importantly, there's a seam-free gusset (it would be remiss of me to not link to Max's gussetfest of a review for similar jeans), where on normal jeans there's a confluence of four seams right where you don't want them.

> Find your nearest dealer here

There is also reflective detailing on the right trouser leg when you roll it up, and there's a little reflective 'flag' hiding in the left rear pocket, ready to be deployed in dark weather.

Endura Urban Jean - cuff.jpg

Endura Urban Jean - cuff.jpg

The back of these jeans is higher than normal jeans, at first perhaps a little odd off the bike, but great for riding – no more exposed lower back. There's a loop for a mini D-lock too.

Endura Urban Jean - back pockets.jpg

Endura Urban Jean - back pockets.jpg

And there's the fit. Endura uses a mix of hardwearing Cordura (you know, the stuff that backpacks are made of) and cotton with mechanical stretch to achieve a fit that is not exactly skinny, but tight enough to not get in the way of chains or other bicycle parts, though not loose enough to bother your aerodynamics too much either. Most importantly for me, and I suspect other cyclists too, is that I can get my cyclist's thighs in no bother without having to go a size up. They feel just right.

Endura Urban Jean - riding.jpg

Endura Urban Jean - riding.jpg

I tested a medium, which according to Endura's size guide corresponds to a 33-35in waist. If anything, I'd say this comes up a bit smaller in the waist than the 34in jeans I'd normally go for. I'm 5ft 10in, and the leg length is spot on.

Endura Urban Jean - back.jpg

Endura Urban Jean - back.jpg

There are the usual pockets you'd expect to find on a pair of jeans; the front pockets are big enough to take your phone and keep it in place. Fastening is taken care of by a proper button and a zip.

Endura Urban Jean - front pockets.jpg

Endura Urban Jean - front pockets.jpg

If it matters to you, the website says they are made in Turkey, but the pair on test says made in Mauritius.

> Buyer's Guide: The best casual kit for commuting by bike

With an RRP of £89.99, they're comparable with other good cycling jeans – a penny less than the Resolute Bay jeans Dave tested a couple of months ago, though a tenner more than Giro's Transfer jeans. They're not cheap, but they are good, and they look like they'll last.

Verdict

Cycling-specific jeans that look good and are comfortable on and off the bike

road.cc test report

Make and model: Endura Urban Jean

Size tested: 34/Medium

Tell us what the product is for

All Endura has to say about this is "Technical performance jean".

Tell us some more about the technical aspects of the product?

Endura lists:

Durable Cotton/Cordura® blend fabric with mechanical stretch

Slim fit extended back for ergonomic cycling

Discretely cycle specific cut with no flap calves

Front hip pockets

Rear patch pockets with pull out 'flag'

D-lock loop for rapid storage retrieval

Reflective tape exposed by rollup hem

Seam free gusset panel

Construction: Cotton 55% / Polyester 30% / Nylon 15%

Size Options: S, M, L, XL, XXL

Rate the product for quality of construction:
 
9/10
Rate the product for performance:
 
8/10
Rate the product for durability:
 
8/10
Rate the product for fit:
 
8/10

The higher back might take a bit of getting used to off the bike, but you soon appreciate why it's there when you hop on a bike.

Rate the product for sizing:
 
5/10

I normally go for 34 inch waist jeans, which are then a bit too big at the waist (so I have to wear a belt), but fit my cyclist's thighs. I'd say there is a little less space left over around the waist on these, and I have lost a bit of weight recently as well, so I reckon they come up a little small.

Rate the product for comfort:
 
9/10

Really nice jeans to wear.

Rate the product for value:
 
6/10

£89.99 is not cheap, but they are very nice.

How easy is the product to care for? How did it respond to being washed?

Machine wash at 40 is what the label says. I had no problems with washing, but as with all jeans, don't go washing them with your whites first time.

Tell us how the product performed overall when used for its designed purpose

Very comfortable jeans both on and off the bike. They just work.

Tell us what you particularly liked about the product

The fit and the feel of the product.

Tell us what you particularly disliked about the product

Nothing comes to mind.

Did you enjoy using the product? Yes

Would you consider buying the product? Yes

Would you recommend the product to a friend? Yes

Use this box to explain your overall score

These jeans work well both on and off the bike, they look good and they are comfortable. I can't think of a single thing I don't like about them.

Overall rating: 8/10

About the tester

Age: 38  Height: 1.78m  Weight: 78kg

I usually ride: All of them!  My best bike is: Cannondale CAAD10

I've been riding for: Over 20 years  I ride: Most days  I would class myself as: Expert

I regularly do the following types of riding: cyclo cross, commuting, touring, mountain biking

22 comments

Avatar
cyclisto [378 posts] 4 months ago
1 like

90 pounds for a pair of pants that are almost 50% made of plastic and don't have different leg sizes per waist size and yet nothing to comment? I want you to be my boss!!

Avatar
Rapha Nadal [826 posts] 4 months ago
4 likes
cyclisto wrote:

90 pounds for a pair of pants that are almost 50% made of plastic and don't have different leg sizes per waist size and yet nothing to comment? I want you to be my boss!!

These are jeans. You wear pants underneath them.

Avatar
Deeferdonk [169 posts] 4 months ago
2 likes

I've just bought some jeans from Rapha for 56 quid. £60 sale price +£5 p&p - 15% code for signing up to newsletter.
Surprised that this seemed to be the cheapest option when googling for cycling jeans.

Avatar
alansmurphy [1779 posts] 4 months ago
0 likes

Too baggy at the bottom, eaten by chain and front mech, not cycling specific...

Avatar
brooksby [3131 posts] 4 months ago
3 likes

I've commuted 6-7 miles each way since October in £10 primark stretch straight leg jeans with no problems (no crotchal rubbing, don't get eaten by my drivetrain). I don't ride a road bike (hybrid with saddlebag or panniers). I don't expect them to last forever, but I bet they'll last more than 1/8th of the lifespan of these Endura ones. Why is putting the "cycling specific " label on clothes seen as a licence to ramp up the price x10??

Avatar
Deeferdonk [169 posts] 4 months ago
5 likes
brooksby wrote:

I've commuted 6-7 miles each way since October in £10 primark stretch straight leg jeans with no problems (no crotchal rubbing,

That's a long time to go without crotchal rubbing!

Avatar
Deeferdonk [169 posts] 4 months ago
4 likes

 

Geordie jeans offer a good fit, especially tight around the arse:

https://youtu.be/kX85QqzrXO0

Avatar
brooksby [3131 posts] 4 months ago
0 likes
Deeferdonk wrote:
brooksby wrote:

I've commuted 6-7 miles each way since October in £10 primark stretch straight leg jeans with no problems (no crotchal rubbing,

That's a long time to go without crotchal rubbing!

OK, then: is it better if I say no *unwanted* crotchal rubbing...?   3

Avatar
mike the bike [1055 posts] 4 months ago
2 likes
brooksby]</p>

<p>

[quote=brooksby

wrote:

OK, then: is it better if I say no *unwanted* crotchal rubbing...?   3

I'm just fascinated by the word. Crotchal.  It rolls effortlessly off the tongue, like that last blob of melting icecream.  Crotchal, crotchal, crotchal.

Later I shall try it out on my lady, the word not the icecream.

Avatar
ConcordeCX [758 posts] 4 months ago
3 likes
mike the bike]</p>

<p>

</p>

<p>[quote=Deeferdonk

wrote:
brooksby wrote:

OK, then: is it better if I say no *unwanted* crotchal rubbing...?   3

I'm just fascinated by the word. Crotchal.  It rolls effortlessly off the tongue, like that last blob of melting icecream.  Crotchal, crotchal, crotchal.

Later I shall try it out on my lady, the word not the icecream.

try out some crotchal rubbing on your lady, video it, and we can all it on Close Pass of the Day

Avatar
captain_slog [443 posts] 4 months ago
1 like

The words 'cycling' and 'jeans' should never be seen anywhere near each other.

And can you not find a jeans reviewer and a jeans model who are less than three sizes apart?

Quote:

Endura's Urban jeans do what they say on the tin: they are jeans designed for cycling in.

2018: more reviews in verse. Fewer cliches.

Avatar
BehindTheBikesheds [1735 posts] 4 months ago
2 likes
captain_slog wrote:

The words 'cycling' and 'jeans' should never be seen anywhere near each other.

And can you not find a jeans reviewer and a jeans model who are less than three sizes apart?

Quote:

Endura's Urban jeans do what they say on the tin: they are jeans designed for cycling in.

2018: more reviews in verse. Fewer cliches.

Oh really? I cycle in my jeans pretty much every week, I've done this since the 80s, like many thousands of others have done before and since. The furthest I've gone of late is about 6 miles each way. These were ordinary jeans with a clip on one leg though I've done the leg tucked into sock thing only last week.

I also wearing cycling chinos (from M&S), I only bought them as they were £15, if there's a pair of jeans that look stylish and avoid the need for a seperate pair of trousers to be changed into then I don't see what the problem is. You can certainly commute quite easily in a pair of bog std jeans and normal undercrackers without it being uncomfortable/sweaty or just fit some cycling/padded undershorts if you must.

Avatar
Iwein Dekoninck [63 posts] 4 months ago
1 like
alansmurphy wrote:

Too baggy at the bottom, eaten by chain and front mech, not cycling specific...

That is not my experience.

Avatar
Iwein Dekoninck [63 posts] 4 months ago
0 likes
Deeferdonk wrote:

I've just bought some jeans from Rapha for 56 quid. £60 sale price +£5 p&p - 15% code for signing up to newsletter. Surprised that this seemed to be the cheapest option when googling for cycling jeans.

I don't recall this offer being available when I submitted the review for publication.

Avatar
bigshape [182 posts] 4 months ago
1 like
brooksby wrote:

I've commuted 6-7 miles each way since October in £10 primark stretch straight leg jeans with no problems (no crotchal rubbing, don't get eaten by my drivetrain). I don't ride a road bike (hybrid with saddlebag or panniers). I don't expect them to last forever, but I bet they'll last more than 1/8th of the lifespan of these Endura ones. Why is putting the "cycling specific " label on clothes seen as a licence to ramp up the price x10??

 

have you ever considered that £90 is probably how much jeans should cost when social and environmental responsibility are taken into account?

 

Avatar
brooksby [3131 posts] 4 months ago
1 like
bigshape wrote:
brooksby wrote:

...

have you ever considered that £90 is probably how much jeans should cost when social and environmental responsibility are taken into account?

Yes, I have.  Unfortunately, a £90+ pair of jeans will be forever out of my affordability range, and I don't believe that they will (1) last any longer than a cheaper pair made using iffy labour practices, and (2) be made using any particularly more ethical practices.  What do you suggest I do?

Avatar
bigshape [182 posts] 4 months ago
0 likes
brooksby wrote:
bigshape wrote:
brooksby wrote:

...

have you ever considered that £90 is probably how much jeans should cost when social and environmental responsibility are taken into account?

Yes, I have.  Unfortunately, a £90+ pair of jeans will be forever out of my affordability range, and I don't believe that they will (1) last any longer than a cheaper pair made using iffy labour practices, and (2) be made using any particularly more ethical practices.  What do you suggest I do?

i guess my experience differs from yours in terms of jeans lasting - i have bought cheap jeans in the past and to me there is a big difference in terms of the fabric, fit and finish quality. i have some more expensive jeans that have well outlasted cheaper pairs - maybe subconsciously i just take better care of them because i know they're more expensive?

as for the ethics - the practices employed by primark and many similar 'fast fashion' brands is widely documented.

you can have a look on the altura website for their ethical practices - https://www.endurasport.com/about/ethical_stance/

i'm not exactly flush either, but i'd rather save up and buy quality (+ wait for sales) than buy cheap 'throwaway' products from companies with suspect manufacturing if i can help it.

i'm not suggesting that you or others should do the same - that's your prerogitive

 

Avatar
brooksby [3131 posts] 4 months ago
2 likes
bigshape wrote:
brooksby wrote:

Yes, I have.  Unfortunately, a £90+ pair of jeans will be forever out of my affordability range, and I don't believe that they will (1) last any longer than a cheaper pair made using iffy labour practices, and (2) be made using any particularly more ethical practices.  What do you suggest I do?

i guess my experience differs from yours in terms of jeans lasting - i have bought cheap jeans in the past and to me there is a big difference in terms of the fabric, fit and finish quality. i have some more expensive jeans that have well outlasted cheaper pairs - maybe subconsciously i just take better care of them because i know they're more expensive?

/snip/

i'd rather save up and buy quality (+ wait for sales) than buy cheap 'throwaway' products from companies with suspect manufacturing if i can help it.

I have had different experiences, clearly.  I find a pair of jeans wears out in much less than a year, regardless of whether I wear them on a bike or not, regardless of whether they are el-cheapo or an expensive brand.  But, ultimately, they're a pair of jeans - you're not supposed to have to take good care of them because they're expensive...

I take your point on ethical manufacturing, but ultimately I'm afraid it comes down to whether I can afford to clothe myself and my own family or not...

Avatar
bigshape [182 posts] 4 months ago
1 like
brooksby wrote:

I have had different experiences, clearly.  I find a pair of jeans wears out in much less than a year, regardless of whether I wear them on a bike or not, regardless of whether they are el-cheapo or an expensive brand.  But, ultimately, they're a pair of jeans - you're not supposed to have to take good care of them because they're expensive...

I take your point on ethical manufacturing, but ultimately I'm afraid it comes down to whether I can afford to clothe myself and my own family or not...

completely understandable!

i guess you simply put a lot more wear and tear into your jeans than me!  1

having said that, as i got onto my bike this morning i managed to rip apart my shorts along the front crotch seam  4 i have had them for about 5 years though!

cheers!

 

Avatar
Jimnm [295 posts] 4 months ago
0 likes
alansmurphy wrote:

Too baggy at the bottom, eaten by chain and front mech, not cycling specific...

These I can recommend, I have two pairs 

of slim fit    https://www.swrve.co.uk/collections/trousers/products/durable-cotton-reg...

Avatar
brooksby [3131 posts] 4 months ago
0 likes
bigshape wrote:
brooksby wrote:

I have had different experiences, clearly.  I find a pair of jeans wears out in much less than a year, regardless of whether I wear them on a bike or not, regardless of whether they are el-cheapo or an expensive brand.  But, ultimately, they're a pair of jeans - you're not supposed to have to take good care of them because they're expensive...

I take your point on ethical manufacturing, but ultimately I'm afraid it comes down to whether I can afford to clothe myself and my own family or not...

completely understandable!

i guess you simply put a lot more wear and tear into your jeans than me!  1

having said that, as i got onto my bike this morning i managed to rip apart my shorts along the front crotch seam  4 i have had them for about 5 years though!

cheers!

 

 3

Avatar
miles_from_anywhere [37 posts] 4 months ago
0 likes

Levis 502 or 541 are perfect for cycling and the larger thighed man  1

Aren't lights on a bike reflective enough!

http://www.levi.com/GB/en_GB/mens-jeans/p/295070011?camp=DRSearch_Levis_...(WIP)