Home
Verdict: 
Simple, solid and generally convenient commuter light with a distinctly European flavour
Weight: 
112g
Busch & Muller IQ Eyro
7 10

The Busch & Muller Lumotec IQ Eyro front light is a simple two-mode rechargeable model with a maximum output of 30 lux. Beam pattern is reasonable navigationally, and run-times between charges are pretty favourable too.

  • Pros: Well built, reasonable output and run-times, less attractive to opportunist thieves
  • Cons: Pedestrian charge times, reflector means pool of light lacks purity of some 300lu compact torch models

Build quality/specification

As I'd expect from this price point, engineering grade plastics run throughout and it feel reassuringly solid. It easily passes for one of B&M's dynamo lamps too – so much so, I was holding B&M dynamo wiring in one hand, perplexed by a lack of ports! Locating the packaging solved that particular mystery: it's fuelled by a rechargeable lithium battery. The casing pops into two halves, revealing the android pattern charge port.

> Find your nearest dealer here

A single LED is projected through a polycarbonate lens and angular reflector that will be familiar to users of modern European dynamo lamps, but distinctly alien if you're coming from torch-type lights of similar capacities.

Talking of which, comparison between lumens and lux are a little tricky since lux is actually a measure of light output within a given area, whereas lumens denotes the total amount of light produced. As a rough 'n' ready: 80-100 lux is my yardstick for fast-paced rural navigation.

With that in mind, I was expecting the IQ Eyro to take suburban/semi-rural stuff in its stride. I've found a 15-lux lamp, powered by Nexus hub dynamo, sufficient in the seen-with sense for scooting through South London. The Eyro's low setting is 10 lux, the minimum permitted by German law.

Mounting bracket

The Eyro comes with a stainless steel fork crown mount, which is designed to place the beam pattern low, illuminating the road ahead, while still providing enough presence to be seen with. My preference is for Gusset 'headlock' type systems rather than a star fangled nut; these use a clamping system that passes right through the head tube, hence I mounted the light via a Trelock handlebar bracket, which still permits some subtle adjustments yet holds the light securely.

Busch and Muller IQ Eyro - mounted.jpg

Busch and Muller IQ Eyro - mounted.jpg

These methods, coupled with the dynamo styling, may make it less appealing to opportunist tea-leaves too.

Output/performance

Out of town, the shallow carpet of light is a bit of a culture shock, coming from high power torches or indeed dynamo lamps, such as the Exposure Revo. To be frank, some 300-lumen compact torch types, including Moon's Meteor C3, produce a purer arc of light, which is much easier to navigate by and nails driver attention too.

That said, the beam quality is still good enough, making it easy to spot holes and other hazards from a safe distance, and permitting moderate 16-23mph speeds through suburban and better lit semi-rural roads.

Lens and reflector project a very reasonable 180-degree cloak of light, with most traffic actively acknowledging me from 30-40 metres. In fact, even the 10 lux will do through well-lit town centres, aided in part by the large additional 'safety' reflector located beneath the lens.

Though relatively tame, 10 lux was still better than some old halogen dynamo lamps from 25 years back, although, away from shared use/similarly segregated lanes, I felt considerably happier pairing it with a small blinkie such as the Infini Luxo.

> Buyer's Guide: The best 2017/2018 front lights for cycling

Curious to see just how it coped along the darker lanes, I've taken it on a few five-mile detours. Again, with the full 30 lux on tap it's broadly on par with a 250-300-lumen torch type and I was able to cruise along at around 14mph with reasonable warning of ruts, holes, glass and iced dung.

Approaching SUVs in particular seemed to display a more cavalier approach to me, often overtaking a stationary vehicle or similar obstruction and drifting into my side of the carriageway. By contrast, a lower power torch type, such as Blackburn's Central 300, induced much greater caution on their part.

Charging

The OEM cable is an android pattern and will also refuel from those designed for tablets rather than phones. Charging took a good three hours from the mains when fully depleted, and communicates reserves in a series of flashes. Clear denotes fully charged and ready to go. There's no danger of over-charging the battery either – it will switch off when fully juiced.

On the bike, it will also communicate charge levels every two minutes. Five flashes denotes 80-100%, four flashes 80-60%, three 60-40%, two 40-20%, and one flash means 20% or less. At this point, the auto kick-down will engage the lowest 10 lux as a failsafe.

Run-times have been accurate, within 3 minutes of the times quoted, and despite some initial trepidation it has always kicked down to 10 lux when the battery's reserves have dwindled.

Switch

This is top mounted and colour coordinated, requiring a firm two-second press to engage. Charge levels allowing, it will default to the highest 30 lux but another firm press will select the 10 lux. It's trickier to use mid-ride compared with multi-mode torch types, but this isn't really necessary, since the system self-regulates when reserves slide. Besides, even allowing for the German standard reflector, you're not going to be dazzling anyone with 30 lux.

Conclusion

The Eyro has a distinctly German/Dutch feel. Commuters wanting classic dynamo styling and decent run-times will probably be its biggest fans.

While it has sufficient navigational clout beyond the suburbs, compared with a contemporary 300-lumen torch type using collimator lens it feels weaker, which came as a culture shock. I would always pair the Eyro with a flashing/pulsing blinkie, regardless of mode.

Verdict

Simple, solid and generally convenient commuter light with a distinctly European flavour

road.cc test report

Make and model: Busch&Muller IQ Eyro

Size tested: 30 Lux

Tell us what the light is for

Busch & Muller says: "The Lumotec IQ Eyro is Busch + Müller's first battery powered front light for fork mounting. The Eyro delivers a bright light with 30 lux and close range illumination. It comes with 2 power-modes. A HighPower-Mode with 30 Lux and a LowPower-Mode with 10 Lux. The runtime amounts up to 5 or 10 hours, depending which mode is used. Charging wherever, whenever - The light/battery unit can quickly be removed from its holder. An Indicator LED gives informations about the battery status. The integrated lithium battery can be charged via USB (cable included). A front reflector for German law approval is integrated."

I'd say it's a simple but generally well-conceived two-mode light with dynamo styling and realistic run times/output for semi-rural commuting.

Tell us some more about the technical aspects of the light?

Two modes 30/10 lux, 5 or 10-hour run-times between charges, automatic safety cut down. Composite construction, rechargeable lithium cell, "intelligent" battery life indicator communicated through single LED diode.

Rate the light for quality of construction:
 
7/10

Well engineered from sturdy composites.

Rate the light for design and ease of use. How simple was the light to use?
 
7/10

Huge top-mounted switch, positive and easy to use, all the more so when bar- rather than fork-mounted.

Rate the light for the design and usability of the clamping system/s
 
7/10

Fork mounting has a very European flavour and is generally very secure, making theft less likely. However, the inclusion of a bar bracket would have been welcome. That said, fork mounting arguably provides the best pool of light.

Rate the light for waterproofing. How did it stand up to the elements?
 
7/10

Batteries, switch gear and diodes seem well sealed.

Rate the light for battery life. How long did it last? How long did it take to recharge?
 
7/10

Accurate. Output will wane steadily when reserves dip below 10% or so, but it's not particularly dramatic, and by that point it's likely you would be recharging.

Rate the light for performance:
 
7/10

Very good, especially in town, and not bad navigationally through better-lit semi-rural sections. However, it's a little weaker than some 300-lumen torch models using collimator lenses.

Rate the light for durability:
 
7/10
Rate the light for weight:
 
6/10

Not particularly weighty and a resin, bar-mounted bracket will also scrub off a few grams, although this is unlikely to bother commuters and utility riders.

Rate the light for value:
 
6/10

Tell us how the light performed overall when used for its designed purpose

Overall, I've been pleasantly surprised by B&M's first foray into the battery light market. Aimed at commuters, 30 lux is actually pretty good and though it produces a less intense arc of light than we've come to expect from torch type models packing 300-400 lumens, I've been able to navigate semi-rural sections at 18mph with a good view of upcoming hazards. At the other extreme, 10 lux is a little impotent but still adequate in well-lit town contexts and dual-use paths, though I've been inclined to pair it with a blinkie, since these seem to captivate other traffic faster than the steady settings.

Tell us what you particularly liked about the light

Dynamo styling, simple, practical design.

Tell us what you particularly disliked about the light

Nothing given the design brief.

Did you enjoy using the light? Yes

Would you consider buying the light? A little underpowered for my needs, but for a town bike, yes.

Would you recommend the light to a friend? Yes, in the above context.

Use this box to explain your overall score

Competent town light with a distinctly European flavour and similarly practical touches. However, some UK riders will miss the wider choice of settings provided by the multi-mode torch types commanding similar cash.

Overall rating: 7/10

About the tester

Age: 44  Height: 1m 81cm  Weight: 70kg

I usually ride: Rough Stuff Tourer Based around 4130 Univega mtb Frameset  My best bike is: 1955 Holdsworth Road Path and several others including cross & traditional road

I've been riding for: Over 20 years  I ride: Most days  I would class myself as: Experienced

I regularly do the following types of riding: cyclo cross, commuting, touring, fixed/singlespeed, mountain biking

Shaun Audane is a freelance writer/product tester with over twenty-eight years riding experience, the last twelve (120,000 miles) spent putting bikes and kit through their paces for a variety of publications. Previous generations of his family worked at manufacturing's sharp end, thus Shaun can weld, has a sound understanding of frame building practice and a preference for steel or titanium framesets.
Citing Richard Ballantine and an Au pair as his earliest cycling influences, he is presently writing a cycling book with particular focus upon women, families and disabled audiences (Having been a registered care manager and coached children at Herne Hill Velodrome in earlier careers)

17 comments

Avatar
kil0ran [856 posts] 6 months ago
1 like

Android pattern? Do you mean Micro-USB? Most current gen Android phones have swapped over to USB-C charging now (reversible connector like Apple Lightning)

Avatar
txortena [10 posts] 6 months ago
3 likes

According to the Busch & Müller site, the battery charging connection is Micro-USB. There is no such thing as "Android pattern charge port".

Avatar
StraelGuy [1406 posts] 6 months ago
0 likes

Damn, us roadies are a picky lot! I was thinking the same thing though .

Avatar
BehindTheBikesheds [1885 posts] 6 months ago
0 likes

Sorry but if you can only manage "reasonable" warning of road ruts at 14mph this isn't half the light of the 25Lux Sigma Pava. In fact there are a couple of the Sigma lights that are better and have a proper focused beam, the Sigma Sportster or Lightster as a rechargeable light would be better and is similarly priced at £27/£25 respectively

I'm surprised you need 80-100Lux to see for fast paced rural cycling, that's a serious amount of light that you could do 35+mph runs on twisty downhills.

Avatar
Christopher TR1 [187 posts] 6 months ago
1 like

The last place you want to be looking for bike lighting is Germany. Remember those old dynamo lights from way back, when you had to push the little plastic wheel against the sidewall of your tyre? Well, they are still commonplace over here, and that pretty much sums up how far behind they are here. They have a law (StVO) which forbids cyclists to use anything brighter than a damp candle, lest they should dazzle any Audi SUV drivers.

Avatar
honesty [76 posts] 6 months ago
4 likes
Christopher TR1 wrote:

The last place you want to be looking for bike lighting is Germany. Remember those old dynamo lights from way back, when you had to push the little plastic wheel against the sidewall of your tyre? Well, they are still commonplace over here, and that pretty much sums up how far behind they are here. They have a law (StVO) which forbids cyclists to use anything brighter than a damp candle, lest they should dazzle any Audi SUV drivers.

 

errm. No. Stvzo stops lights dazzling other road users it doesn’t reduce light power and Germany is the place to go to for decent hub dynamo and light systems. Given I have 100 lux from my current dynamo front light I would know...

Avatar
oldstrath [968 posts] 6 months ago
0 likes
honesty wrote:
Christopher TR1 wrote:

The last place you want to be looking for bike lighting is Germany. Remember those old dynamo lights from way back, when you had to push the little plastic wheel against the sidewall of your tyre? Well, they are still commonplace over here, and that pretty much sums up how far behind they are here. They have a law (StVO) which forbids cyclists to use anything brighter than a damp candle, lest they should dazzle any Audi SUV drivers.

 

errm. No. Stvzo stops lights dazzling other road users it doesn’t reduce light power and Germany is the place to go to for decent hub dynamo and light systems. Given I have 100 lux from my current dynamo front light I would know...

Given how high up some SUVs put the driver, maybe there's a case for relaxing the STVZO conditions on above horizon light, which are much more restrictive on bike lights than on car lights. 

I'm not at all convinced by the mounting angle shown in the article though - pointing this down surely makes a not-great thing much worse.

Avatar
Deeferdonk [184 posts] 6 months ago
3 likes
Christopher TR1 wrote:

The last place you want to be looking for bike lighting is Germany. Remember those old dynamo lights from way back, when you had to push the little plastic wheel against the sidewall of your tyre? Well, they are still commonplace over here, and that pretty much sums up how far behind they are here. 

I have a modern bottle dynamo of this type on my hybrid/runaraound/everyday bike, as it was cheaper than getting a hub dynamo.

Don't notice it when i'm cycling, (reassuring slight whirring sound) never have to worry about running out of battery power, lights bolted on as you never have to take them off to charge.

To me that seems more advanced than most people who have to take lights off and plug them into a wall every couple of days, and can't lock their bikes up without taking their lights off so they are not nicked.

Technically my lights run on cake!  1

Avatar
kamoshika [236 posts] 6 months ago
1 like

Seeing as the discussion here seems to have turned to dynamos, this mightbe a good place to ask - road.cc folk, please could you do a group test of dynamo hubs and lights? Quite a few people on here seem to use them, or do the kind of riding that they're suitable for, so something like your light comparison, but with dynamos (ride on rollers, or rig up something to spin the wheel at a known speed?) would be great.

Avatar
oldstrath [968 posts] 6 months ago
1 like
kamoshika wrote:

Seeing as the discussion here seems to have turned to dynamos, this mightbe a good place to ask - road.cc folk, please could you do a group test of dynamo hubs and lights? Quite a few people on here seem to use them, or do the kind of riding that they're suitable for, so something like your light comparison, but with dynamos (ride on rollers, or rig up something to spin the wheel at a known speed?) would be great.

I think his photos exaggerate the brightness, but Peter White did this

 

http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/headlights.php

 

Avatar
belabatnom [26 posts] 6 months ago
0 likes

I spent a long time looking for this kind of fork mounted light with built in reflector (though I was looking for something that would run off AAs rather than click out for recharging as I wanted it as a backup light) In the end I found some on ebay from a cycling store that looked like it knew what it was talking about. The light itself is fine (cost ten pounds) though the styling is a bit more retro. What I did find was that mounting on my front brake caliper with the included mount caused my long drop brakes to be pushed forward so that they began to rub on my tyre. Adding my mudguard made the problem even worse. It took some serious fettling with a dremel and a replacement mount to get things back within tolerances. Just something to think about if you'd like to fork mount a light like this. 

Avatar
Christopher TR1 [187 posts] 6 months ago
0 likes
honesty wrote:
Christopher TR1 wrote:

The last place you want to be looking for bike lighting is Germany. Remember those old dynamo lights from way back, when you had to push the little plastic wheel against the sidewall of your tyre? Well, they are still commonplace over here, and that pretty much sums up how far behind they are here. They have a law (StVO) which forbids cyclists to use anything brighter than a damp candle, lest they should dazzle any Audi SUV drivers.

 

errm. No. Stvzo stops lights dazzling other road users it doesn’t reduce light power and Germany is the place to go to for decent hub dynamo and light systems. Given I have 100 lux from my current dynamo front light I would know...

Errm. You just confirmed my comment "errm. No. Stvzo stops lights dazzling other road users": Like I said, stops cyclist dazzling Audi drivers. 

You only need to read the review to understand that this is not a bright light.

Avatar
Dr_Lex [469 posts] 6 months ago
2 likes

^This is a low-priced, low power commuter light; there are plenty of German StVO-approved lights which are brighter, both battery- and dynamo-powered.

 

I’d second the suggestion of a dynamo group test - I treat my set-up as DRL.

Avatar
huntswheelers [132 posts] 6 months ago
1 like

I've started fitting loads of hub dynamos on commuters bikes from city to mtb and tourers.... all shimano units and all on LED lighting. Brilliant for commuters and also the LED can be had with capacitors to keep them lit when stopped.... many of my customers keep them on all the time even daylight. The LED lights are really good now and the hub dynamo wheels are not as expensive as you think..... my Dutch Cortina Transport has LED battery powered units.... fabulous.. by AXA (ones which I prefer for look, usability and price) 

Avatar
jerome [42 posts] 6 months ago
0 likes

I have a similar B&M light on a dynamo hub. It does a good job at lighting the road without blinding other road users or pedestrians on shared pathes, due to its shape. For sure the 300lu torch user doesn't give a ****. It deserves a better mark.

Avatar
martynshort [7 posts] 6 months ago
0 likes
Christopher TR1 wrote:
honesty wrote:
Christopher TR1 wrote:

The last place you want to be looking for bike lighting is Germany. Remember those old dynamo lights from way back, when you had to push the little plastic wheel against the sidewall of your tyre? Well, they are still commonplace over here, and that pretty much sums up how far behind they are here. They have a law (StVO) which forbids cyclists to use anything brighter than a damp candle, lest they should dazzle any Audi SUV drivers.

 

errm. No. Stvzo stops lights dazzling other road users it doesn’t reduce light power and Germany is the place to go to for decent hub dynamo and light systems. Given I have 100 lux from my current dynamo front light I would know...

Errm. You just confirmed my comment "errm. No. Stvzo stops lights dazzling other road users": Like I said, stops cyclist dazzling Audi drivers. 

You only need to read the review to understand that this is not a bright light.

Absolutely rubbish. I use a Philips Saferide which is StVZO approved, and it puts out plenty of light. Enough that I can happily commute in pitch black on the low power setting. It lights up the whole road ahead of me for a good 10 - 15 metres, but doesn't blind oncoming traffic. I don't understand why you think shining a light into the eyes of oncoming motorists is a good idea? Do you WANT them to hit you!?

Avatar
Peowpeowpeowlasers [604 posts] 6 months ago
0 likes
Christopher TR1 wrote:

The last place you want to be looking for bike lighting is Germany. Remember those old dynamo lights from way back, when you had to push the little plastic wheel against the sidewall of your tyre? Well, they are still commonplace over here, and that pretty much sums up how far behind they are here. They have a law (StVO) which forbids cyclists to use anything brighter than a damp candle, lest they should dazzle any Audi SUV drivers.

Absolute bollocks.  I have a Lupine SL A7, it is bright enough for 30mph+ on the flat.  Should you be unlucky enough to fall on the floor and stare into the part of the beam that isn't cut off (for other road users), you'll end up like a vampire under UV light.

Here's an image to show you just how good a correctly-designed bicycle light can be:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/soundman/38826624321/in/photostream/