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Verdict: 
Decent pump that marries form and function, but look to its HP sibling if you need more than 110psi
Weight: 
166g
Unich Mini Floor Pump
7 10

Unich describes its Mini Floor Pump as being “like a floor pump but minimized so you can carry it when you ride”. Made from silver anodised, CNC machined aluminium, at 166g it's a fair bit lighter than Lezyne's Micro Floor Drive (arguably its closest rival) while losing little in terms of refinement/efficiency.

In keeping with this established and long-term favourite, there are two versions, one supposedly capable of delivering sky-high pressures (140psi) and this one, a more moderate 110psi.

> Find your nearest dealer here

The Lezyne has a wider range of adaptors/accessories for inflating beach balls, air beds and other oddments you might haul on a beach-bound weekend tour. But the Unich's uncluttered looks and sound engineering mean it's delightfully simple to use, with no fiddly bits to lose.

Simply unscrew the appropriate end, thread snugly to the Presta/Schrader valve, and inflate. The CNC machined end tucks inside the handle, which not only looks neat but prevents it being caked in mucky spatter.

Unich Mini Floor Pump - top and hose.jpg

Unich Mini Floor Pump - top and hose.jpg

This pump also features a flick-out stabiliser foot, designed to rest against terra firma while you ram in the pressure. In reality, this has only been necessary when delivering those final 30psi into a more typical 25mm section training tyre.

Unich Mini Floor Pump - base.jpg

Unich Mini Floor Pump - base.jpg

I've found ours comfortable to hold in the palm, and despite diminutive dimensions that rounded handle offers efficient, blister-free purchase.

Unich Mini Floor Pump - top and hose.jpg

Unich Mini Floor Pump - top and hose.jpg

Getting even bigger section 35mm commuter/touring tyres up to speed is remarkably easy – I had them up to 30psi in 30 strokes and 35 seconds, 70psi in 70. Beyond this and resistance becomes very apparent, although the pump's action remains smooth and refined, with no hint of flex when placed on the ground and used trackpump style. After 145 strokes and almost three minutes I pumped a 700x35 tyre to 85psi, 150 strokes (2mins 45secs) took a 700x28 from pancake flat to 100, and 121 strokes took a 700x25 tyre to 110psi.

Beyond 80 and my arm was stinging with lactic acid, and by 110psi, the pump was locked out. Thankfully the screw fit head doesn't rob you of any when uncoupling.

> Check out our guide to the best pumps and CO2 inflators here

Integral gauges divide opinion. I prefer to cross reference my track pumps with a standalone digital model, but by the roadside, things need to be approximately accurate rather than pin-point precise. This one is easy to read from a glance and seemingly accurate to within 5psi when checked against my digital unit. There's also a handy bleed button should you get carried away and over-inflate a Schrader tyre, though you'll need to engage this before disconnecting from Presta valves.

Unich Mini Floor Pump - gauge.jpg

Unich Mini Floor Pump - gauge.jpg

Our first sample's gauge failed after six tyres, which was disappointing but covered under warranty, and the piston's action remained silky smooth and efficient. It's pretty good with really big sections too – 26x1.75 hit 80psi in 280 strokes, 20 fewer than the Lezyne.

Pumps this size require sturdy brackets. The OEM unit supplied is minimalist and, generally speaking, up to the job, with no obvious signs of slippage or allowing the pump head to chatter woodpecker-fashion against the down tube, which can even leave tiny dents in very thin wall tubing over time. I'm pleased to report rock steady tenure in other brands' resin brackets too – my Univega's host was sturdy enough to permit worry-free rough riding.

Unich Mini Floor Pump - on bike.jpg

Unich Mini Floor Pump - on bike.jpg

Push comes to shove, even though 110psi is more than adequate for roadside repatriation, especially since an increasing number of us reach for our CO2 inflators first and use pumps as fail-safes, I would probably opt for its 140psi counterpart, since it covers pretty much all the bases road-wise.

Verdict

Decent pump that marries form and function, but look to its HP sibling if you need more than 110psi

road.cc test report

Make and model: Unich Mini Floor Pump

Size tested: n/a

Tell us what the product is for, and who it's aimed at. What do the manufacturers say about it? How does that compare to your own feelings about it?

Unich says: "It is like a floor pump but minimized so that you can carry it when you ride.

"UNICH MINI FLOOR PUMP is a lightweight and durable hand pump which is made from CNC machined aluminum.

"It is available in big-volume modes, which easily inflates tires with fewer strokes.

"The big volume MINI FLOOR PUMP will work with mountain bikes, which can easily tires with fewer strokes."

Also works well with mid section road tyres and will genuinely achieve 110psi, which is adequate for a lot of training tyres by the roadside.

Tell us some more about the technical aspects of the product?

CNC machined aluminium, integral pressure gauge, reversible head, bleed valve, 110psi maximum pressure

Rate the product for quality of construction:
 
7/10

Beautifully finished and feels robust, even when ramming those higher pressures in. That said, the integral gauge failed early on with our initial sample.

Rate the product for performance:
 
7/10

Robust and generally very efficient.

Rate the product for durability:
 
7/10
Our first sample's gauge failed early on, but would be covered under warranty, and no further problems.
Rate the product for weight (if applicable)
 
7/10

Solid but competitive alongside others of this genre.

Rate the product for comfort (if applicable)
 
6/10

Pleasant to use but past 85psi and lactic acid courses through the biceps.

Rate the product for value:
 
6/10

Tell us how the product performed overall when used for its designed purpose

Overall, the Unich is a very refined, comprehensive and well thought out pump that delivers pressures very efficiently and will genuinely manage 110psi. However, higher pressures common to 25mm training tyres require quite a bit of gusto past 85psi. Even then, the piston shows no sign of turning to blancmange. This version is a good all-rounder, well suited to a varied fleet and the reversible Presta/Schrader head is refreshingly plug 'n' play but road purists are arguably better served by its HP sibling.

Tell us what you particularly liked about the product

Nice blend of form and function, notably lighter than some direct competitors.

Tell us what you particularly disliked about the product

Nothing, given the design brief.

Did you enjoy using the product? Yes

Would you consider buying the product? Yes

Would you recommend the product to a friend? Yes, if they had a mixed fleet, otherwise I'd suggest the HP version.

Use this box to explain your score

Good pump that marries form and function and genuinely capable of 110psi but requires effort past 85psi, so best suited to riders wanting a single pump to port between cross, tourer and mountain bike.

Overall rating: 7/10

About the tester

Age: 42  Height: 1m 81  Weight: 70kg

I usually ride: Rough stuff tourer based around 4130 Univega mountain bike frameset  My best bike is: 1955 Holdsworth Road Path and several others including cross & traditional road

I've been riding for: Over 20 years  I ride: Most days  I would class myself as: Experienced

I regularly do the following types of riding: cyclo-cross, commuting, touring, fixed/singlespeed, mountain biking

Shaun Audane is a freelance writer/product tester with over twenty-eight years riding experience, the last twelve (120,000 miles) spent putting bikes and kit through their paces for a variety of publications. Previous generations of his family worked at manufacturing's sharp end, thus Shaun can weld, has a sound understanding of frame building practice and a preference for steel or titanium framesets.
Citing Richard Ballantine and an Au pair as his earliest cycling influences, he is presently writing a cycling book with particular focus upon women, families and disabled audiences (Having been a registered care manager and coached children at Herne Hill Velodrome in earlier careers)