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Woman hit by truck in fifth Cycle Superhighway 2 fatality

The BBC reports that a female cyclist in her mid-20s has died after being hit by a lorry at London's Bow roundabout this morning.

The as-yet-unnamed woman was pronounced dead at the scene after being attended by London Ambulance Service. The crash happened at about 08:47 GMT.

In a statement, the Metropolitan Police said: "It is believed the lorry was travelling west along the A11, entering the roundabout to turn south towards the Blackwall Tunnel.

"The cyclist is believed to have been travelling in the same direction when the collision occurred.

"The male driver of the lorry stopped at the scene. There have been no arrests."

Ross Lydal of the Evening Standard reports that the woman was not actually on Cycle Superhighway 2 at the time. The notoriously dangerous route has recently been extended east of Bow Roundabout with a largely-segregated lane to Stratford.

Cyclist Robin Stephenson told the Standard about the aftermath of the crash which he saw as he rode over the Bow flyover on his way to work as an IT manager: “The traffic was backing up from Stratford High Street. I went over the flyover and saw a huge number of emergency services down there.

“I commute that way every weekday but don’t use the roundabout - I won’t use it. I go over the flyover rather than round the roundabout. The whole area is just dreadful. The only way that they will fix it is to have full segregation for cyclists.”

The London Cycling Campaign has announced a protest ride this evening at Bow roundabout, meeting at 6pm for 6.30. 

LCC's Chief Executive Ashok Sinha said, "Although we don't know the exact circumstances of today's crash, we know it happened just a few metres from where Svitlana Tereschenko was killed in 2011.

"It's unbelievable that we are, again, two years after that death, calling on Mayor Boris Johnson to install cycling and pedestrian-safe traffic lights at Bow roundabout to prevent more Londoners being killed.

"A cyclist-specific traffic lights were recommended by TfL's own consultants before Superhighway 2 was built, but the recommendations of expert consultants, cyclists and pedestrians have been ignored."

The Metropolitan Police are appealing for witnesses who should contact the witness appeal line on 020 8597 4747.

The woman is the fourth cyclist to die on London's roads in the last week, and the twelfth this year. 

Last Thursday hospital porter Brian Holt was killed when he was hit by a lorry on Cycle Superhighway 2 at Mile End. Hours later planning expert Francis Golding was hit by a coach in Holborn and died of his injuries the next day. Yesterday a 40-year-old man was killed when he was hit by a bus in Croydon.

Since it opened in 2011, three cyclists have died in collisions with trucks on  Cycle Superhighway 2, and three more have died very close to the route while apparently about to join it.

The first was Brian Dorling in 2011, followed just three weeks later by Svitlana Tereschenko, who while not technically on CS2 at the time was at Bow Roundabout, about to use the route to ride west.

French student Philippine De Gerin-Ricard was also hit by a tipper truck when she was killed on July 7 of this year, and on September 15 nursing assistant Maria Karsa was hit by a truck at the Aldgate gyratory, just before the western end of CS2. 

 

Our official grumpy Northerner, John has been riding bikes for over 30 years since discovering as an uncoordinated teen that a sport could be fun if it didn't require you to catch a ball or get in the way of a hulking prop forward.

Road touring was followed by mountain biking and a career racing in the mud that was as brief as it was unsuccessful.

Somewhere along the line came the discovery that he could string a few words together, followed by the even more remarkable discovery that people were mug enough to pay for this rather than expecting him to do an honest day's work. He's pretty certain he's worked for even more bike publications than Mat Brett.

The inevitable 30-something MAMIL transition saw him shift to skinny tyres and these days he lives in Cambridge where the lack of hills is more than made up for by the headwinds.

49 comments

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spatuluk [27 posts] 2 years ago
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So, what were cyclist fatality figures like before the cycle superhighways? Are they causing deaths?

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thelimopit [136 posts] 2 years ago
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God, this is becoming a grimly predictable daily occurrence.

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Coleman [331 posts] 2 years ago
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spatuluk wrote:

So, what were cyclist fatality figures like before the cycle superhighways? Are they causing deaths?

It is possible that they have contributed to fatalities. Like Bow Roundabout, some of the road markings lead cyclists into more dangerous positions. There is also the possibility that strips of blue paint give some cyclists a false sense of security. Some of these junctions are multi-lane and fast moving. I think many cyclists would have avoided them but have followed the blue paint. After all, it is quite reasonable to assume that TfL would have made them safer for cyclists if they were prepared to mark them as cycle routes. Sorry, 'superhighways'.

A case for a corporate manslaughter charge. TfL commissioned studies and then ignored their recommendations. It is disgusting that is has taken deaths and demonstrations to get TfL to consider revising their plans.

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Wookie [213 posts] 2 years ago
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I used to use the flyover when coming in London but since Boris's "improvements" cyclists are forced down to the roundabout.
I personally am not convinced that Boris really gives a shit about cycle safety just his next election.

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AyBee [85 posts] 2 years ago
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thelimopit has hit it on the head - "strips of blue paint give some cyclists a false sense of security." Inexperienced cyclists (in the large number of cases) assume that the blue paint is a cycle lane, it's not, there's nothing to stop cars, buses and lorries driving in it/parking over it and you still have to be very aware of your surroundings on a busy road.

RIP, once again!

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zanf [763 posts] 2 years ago
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AyBee wrote:

thelimopit has hit it on the head - "strips of blue paint give some cyclists a false sense of security." Inexperienced cyclists (in the large number of cases) assume that the blue paint is a cycle lane...

Considering the exponential uptake in utility cycling in the last few years means a hell of a lot of people.

It is happening now that the roads are too congested, our air quality is some of the lowest in Europe (with associated pollution deaths rates climbing) and TfL/Johnson still refuse to accept that it is their responsibility to introduce measures to curtail motorised traffic, rather than maintaining "traffic flow" at the expense of pedestrian and cyclists lives, and everyones general health.

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Gizmo_ [1333 posts] 2 years ago
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This is becoming ridiculous.  14

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YorkshireMike [91 posts] 2 years ago
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Incredibly sad to read of this spate of deaths over the past few days, in London and around the country. As Spatuluk says, it's becoming grimly predictable. A very sad and infuriatingly frustrating set of circumstances.

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dockhill [8 posts] 2 years ago
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This at the same time that TfL is actually asking people to cycle/walk instead of taking the Northern Line.

CS7 if, of course, really wide and well layed-out all along the route...

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AyBee [85 posts] 2 years ago
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zanf wrote:
AyBee wrote:

thelimopit has hit it on the head - "strips of blue paint give some cyclists a false sense of security." Inexperienced cyclists (in the large number of cases) assume that the blue paint is a cycle lane...

Considering the exponential uptake in utility cycling in the last few years means a hell of a lot of people.

It is happening now that the roads are too congested, our air quality is some of the lowest in Europe (with associated pollution deaths rates climbing) and TfL/Johnson still refuse to accept that it is their responsibility to introduce measures to curtail motorised traffic, rather than maintaining "traffic flow" at the expense of pedestrian and cyclists lives, and everyones general health.

Not at all. I don't think congestion is the problem, high traffic generally means slow traffic, but you're sending inexperienced people (new cyclists) into dangerous areas (roads) with a false sense of security that it's safe. There's a reason that car drivers go through tests before they're on the road and whilst the majority of cyclists have a driving license, you can get on the busy roads of London on a bike without having any experience of roads at all. Is it coincidence that all these deaths are caused by large vehicles or are inexperienced cyclists putting themselves in dangerous places too (I'm not saying that this is the case this time because I don't know)? It's extremely difficult to drive a big vehicle in London (I would hate to have to do it myself) but I see, every day, people putting themselves in vulnerable positions to save themselves about 10 seconds off their commute (CS7 daily commuter).

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Shades [285 posts] 2 years ago
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The Robin Stephenson comment to The Standard 'hit the nail on the head'. He won't use the roundabout because it's too dangerous, even if it has got a CS on it. How much risk do you want to take? I'm not sure some inexperienced cyclists can make an accurate assessment.
I'm not a London cyclist but I was driving down the A36 south of Bath at 0630 recently; pitch black and raining. Coming the other way was a cyclist; no high viz and basic lights. I thought, you are crazy - I wouldn't ride on the A36 on a glorious summers day. Obviously he's OK with the risk.

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mrmo [2022 posts] 2 years ago
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Quote:

It's extremely difficult to drive a big vehicle in London

As i see it two solutions, ban hgvs or ban cycles. Or at the least ban the prescence of those groups at certain times of day and night.

Will anyone actually bite the bullet and do it?

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Mendip James [38 posts] 2 years ago
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I am sure experience comes into it but equally a good deal of pure chance, I regulary cycle away from the office in Hammersmith after work and the road is totally gridlocked, nose to tail traffic 2 vehicles abreast, beyond riding on the pavement which I don't consider an option it can feel like moving between the cars is a game of Russian Roulette. I've been cycling 30 years but it wouldn't stop a car or bus pulling forward and squashing me against the other vehicles, I do understand people's points about completely novice riders though. Fortunately I don't have far to go before I can take a backroute but it is ridiculous. I don't have the magic answer although traffic is better during school holidays so discouraging that traffic would be a start perhaps. Got knocked off last week by a driver pulling out and count myself pretty lucky to have got away with bruises.

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kie7077 [833 posts] 2 years ago
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associated pollution deaths rates

4,000 a year in London to put a figure on it, I've never heard about Boris doing anything meaningful to address this. I am coughing daily, I don't smoke, I dont have a cold, it's the crap coming out of diesel hgvs buses, cabs and even motorbikes.

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kie7077 [833 posts] 2 years ago
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AyBee wrote:

every day, people putting themselves in vulnerable positions to save themselves about 10 seconds off their commute (CS7 daily commuter).

Maybe this wouldn't be happening if we had high quality cycling infrastructure.

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brackley88 [135 posts] 2 years ago
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Terrible news.

Interesting to consider why so many in the last week, some thoughts:

1) a sudden surge in cycling - doubt it
2) a sudden surge in large vehicles - doubt it
3) a change in road rules - not that I know
4) a change in cycling behaviour - unlikely
5) a change in visibility - aha....I wonder. Things have just got darker and wetter, both of which can reduce visibility. I would think that low down lights are harder to see for a large vehicle driver than a head in daylight which will be perhaps 2 feet higher up....purely conjecture, but worth considering.

What does this tell me:

1) Make sure all our lights are working
2) Wear hi-viz and reflective clothing
3) ...and most importantly, be even more careful and warry of big vehicles in the dark

What do others think?

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Karbon Kev [688 posts] 2 years ago
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This is absolutely bloody ludicrous! It has to stop!

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AyBee [85 posts] 2 years ago
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kie7077 wrote:
AyBee wrote:

every day, people putting themselves in vulnerable positions to save themselves about 10 seconds off their commute (CS7 daily commuter).

Maybe this wouldn't be happening if we had high quality cycling infrastructure.

Almost certainly it wouldn't be happening, but it doesn't need to be happening now either, keep yourself away from large vehicles at junctions unless you know 100% that you can pass them before they start moving. Look after number 1, don't rely on others to do it for you.

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Rouboy [88 posts] 2 years ago
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Time for politicians to start acting instead of paying lip service for their own selfish gains????
RIP

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YorkshireMike [91 posts] 2 years ago
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I think most of these collisions have happened in daylight and clear conditions, so while I wouldn't dream of riding without lights at this time of year, I wouldn't say that it's always going to be a deciding factor - a picture of one chap's mangled bike yesterday showed clearly that he had lights on.

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Housecathst [383 posts] 2 years ago
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This just dreadful, and heart breaking that this news is coming on a daily basis right now.

When riding a bike on the roads of this country you have to assume that ALL motorists are out to murder you, if you look at every other vehicle in that light your one step to being safer on the roads.

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Neil753 [447 posts] 2 years ago
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Actually, the BBC didn't report that, "a female cyclist in her mid-20s has died after being hit by a lorry at London's Bow roundabout this morning". What this BBC article actually said was that, "a cyclist has been killed in a crash with a lorry".

Is it just me, or do other cyclists feel that the BBC seems keen to report cylists as being in a crash with, crashing into, in collision with, or colliding with, a vehicle?

In the very same piece, the BBC reports other recent incidents, thus:

"a male cyclist suffered life threatening injuries after in a crash with a lorry"

"a cyclist in his 40s died after a crash with a bus"

"a cyclist died after a collision with a tipper lorry"

Do you sense a pattern here? You've only got to search the BBC archives and this becomes even more noticeable. Even cyclists who are hit from behind, or even stationary, are described as colliding with, or in collision with, the vehicle.

Sure, once the driver goes to court, the vehicle is described as hitting the cyclist but, in the initial reports before the true facts are known, the BBC do seem to have a propensity to report that it is the cyclist who is doing the colliding.

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colinth [191 posts] 2 years ago
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You'd think 4 people tragically being killed in a week would spark some sort of crisis talks at local or even national government level. 4 people dead, it's just terrible and happens so often that I feat it's almost startting to be treated by the powers that be as "normal". Is there any other example of so many people dying in similar circumstances (not just this past week) and practically nothing being done about it ?

If the biggest 10 businesses in London told the government to fix it or they'd leave the city, it'd be sorted within months.

People being killed simply travelling to work just doesn't seem to be a problem for some, it's just unbelieveable

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Colin Peyresourde [1637 posts] 2 years ago
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brackley88 wrote:

Terrible news.

Interesting to consider why so many in the last week, some thoughts:

1) a sudden surge in cycling - doubt it
2) a sudden surge in large vehicles - doubt it
3) a change in road rules - not that I know
4) a change in cycling behaviour - unlikely
5) a change in visibility - aha....I wonder. Things have just got darker and wetter, both of which can reduce visibility. I would think that low down lights are harder to see for a large vehicle driver than a head in daylight which will be perhaps 2 feet higher up....purely conjecture, but worth considering.

What does this tell me:

1) Make sure all our lights are working
2) Wear hi-viz and reflective clothing
3) ...and most importantly, be even more careful and warry of big vehicles in the dark

What do others think?

I don't really agree about the visibility. This crash in this case was around 9:00am which would mean daylight visibility. It could be that low sunshine blinded the cyclist or driver.

The shocking incident in Croydon was mid-day, so there would be no question of visibility.

And the architect got hit in the evening - which means that this would fit your causality, but it is hardly shows any trend for the time of die.

Statistics can sort of lie with these sorts of things. Just because they happen close together does not mean the streets of London are any more dangerous, it is rather the case that this unfortunate incidents happen so close together.

Perhaps the only link is that these people seem to have used cycling to commute. I wonder if they used their bike for more diverse purposes they may have put themselves out of harms way (i.e. made themselves more experienced).

In my experience riding in London is all about knowing what is going on around you and making sure you don't put yourself in a silly position. In all of these cases it should be noted that the drivers are not reported to have been driving noticeably recklessly. There is some evidence that the cyclists were, perhaps, not in the best positions.

Better infrastructure will help, but we need to get people educated asap as unless someone here has a spare billion sitting in their pants to change London's roads.

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GoingRoundInCycles [133 posts] 2 years ago
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Neil753 wrote:

Actually, the BBC didn't report that, "a female cyclist in her mid-20s has died after being hit by a lorry at London's Bow roundabout this morning". What this BBC article actually said was that, "a cyclist has been killed in a crash with a lorry".

Is it just me, or do other cyclists feel that the BBC seems keen to report cylists as being in a crash with, crashing into, in collision with, or colliding with, a vehicle?

In the very same piece, the BBC reports other recent incidents, thus:

"a male cyclist suffered life threatening injuries after in a crash with a lorry"

"a cyclist in his 40s died after a crash with a bus"

"a cyclist died after a collision with a tipper lorry"

Do you sense a pattern here? You've only got to search the BBC archives and this becomes even more noticeable. Even cyclists who are hit from behind, or even stationary, are described as colliding with, or in collision with, the vehicle.

Sure, once the driver goes to court, the vehicle is described as hitting the cyclist but, in the initial reports before the true facts are known, the BBC do seem to have a propensity to report that it is the cyclist who is doing the colliding.

I think it could be highly prejudicial to report that the driver of a lorry crashed into a cyclist when the actual circumstances are unknown. For that reason, the only description that I object to, of the ones you cited, is the "crashing into" one. That definitely seems to suggest that the cyclist is more to blame.

I think it is wise and fair for a news organisation to impartially report the facts, as known at the time. Accounts from shocked eyewitnesses can be notoriously misleading.

Unless we are prepared to demolish London and start again, it is never going to be Amsterdam or Copenhagen. After 20+ years, I have just about given up on cycling as a means of transportation in London. Leisure only from now on.

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Neil753 [447 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes
GoingRoundInCycles wrote:
Neil753 wrote:

Actually, the BBC didn't report that, "a female cyclist in her mid-20s has died after being hit by a lorry at London's Bow roundabout this morning". What this BBC article actually said was that, "a cyclist has been killed in a crash with a lorry".

Is it just me, or do other cyclists feel that the BBC seems keen to report cylists as being in a crash with, crashing into, in collision with, or colliding with, a vehicle?

In the very same piece, the BBC reports other recent incidents, thus:

"a male cyclist suffered life threatening injuries after in a crash with a lorry"

"a cyclist in his 40s died after a crash with a bus"

"a cyclist died after a collision with a tipper lorry"

Do you sense a pattern here? You've only got to search the BBC archives and this becomes even more noticeable. Even cyclists who are hit from behind, or even stationary, are described as colliding with, or in collision with, the vehicle.

Sure, once the driver goes to court, the vehicle is described as hitting the cyclist but, in the initial reports before the true facts are known, the BBC do seem to have a propensity to report that it is the cyclist who is doing the colliding.

I think it could be highly prejudicial to report that the driver of a lorry crashed into a cyclist when the actual circumstances are unknown. For that reason, the only description that I object to, of the ones you cited, is the "crashing into" one. That definitely seems to suggest that the cyclist is more to blame.

I think it is wise and fair for a news organisation to impartially report the facts, as known at the time. Accounts from shocked eyewitnesses can be notoriously misleading.

Unless we are prepared to demolish London and start again, it is never going to be Amsterdam or Copenhagen. After 20+ years, I have just about given up on cycling as a means of transportation in London. Leisure only from now on.

I agree with you. Reporting a vehicle crashing or coliding with a cyclist would be equally as wrong, and certainly not what I'm suggesting.

What I'm pointing out is the consistent bias in the BBC's reporting (check their archive if you don't believe me). It's virtually impossible to find any instance of a vehicle colliding with, or crashing into, a cyclist, unless they're reporting on a case that has been through court. It's all the intitial reports that I'm talking about, ie the one's where the facts are not yet known.

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Neil753 [447 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes
brackley88 wrote:

Terrible news.

Interesting to consider why so many in the last week, some thoughts:

1) a sudden surge in cycling - doubt it
2) a sudden surge in large vehicles - doubt it
3) a change in road rules - not that I know
4) a change in cycling behaviour - unlikely
5) a change in visibility - aha....I wonder. Things have just got darker and wetter, both of which can reduce visibility. I would think that low down lights are harder to see for a large vehicle driver than a head in daylight which will be perhaps 2 feet higher up....purely conjecture, but worth considering.

What does this tell me:

1) Make sure all our lights are working
2) Wear hi-viz and reflective clothing
3) ...and most importantly, be even more careful and warry of big vehicles in the dark

What do others think?

You've hit three good nails on the head. I don't want to bang on about hi-viz cos I've got three broken spokes to sort out at the moment, but what you're saying is good advice for everyone at this time of year.

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William Black [193 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes
Neil753 wrote:

Actually, the BBC didn't report that, "a female cyclist in her mid-20s has died after being hit by a lorry at London's Bow roundabout this morning". What this BBC article actually said was that, "a cyclist has been killed in a crash with a lorry".

Is it just me, or do other cyclists feel that the BBC seems keen to report cylists as being in a crash with, crashing into, in collision with, or colliding with, a vehicle?

In the very same piece, the BBC reports other recent incidents, thus:

"a male cyclist suffered life threatening injuries after in a crash with a lorry"

"a cyclist in his 40s died after a crash with a bus"

"a cyclist died after a collision with a tipper lorry"

Do you sense a pattern here? You've only got to search the BBC archives and this becomes even more noticeable. Even cyclists who are hit from behind, or even stationary, are described as colliding with, or in collision with, the vehicle.

Sure, once the driver goes to court, the vehicle is described as hitting the cyclist but, in the initial reports before the true facts are known, the BBC do seem to have a propensity to report that it is the cyclist who is doing the colliding.

I pointed out something very similar somewhere else the onus is alway son the cyclist who just happened to ride under the wheels of a lorry.

I don't know if it comes from them trying to be 'unbiased' in their reporting or whether they are bound by law to write what the Police reported at the scene?

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IanW1968 [251 posts] 2 years ago
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I don't ride in London, I don't know the circumstances behind these incidents.

Even in my relatively quiet town, I never ever use the little bit of painted road if it takes me to the left of a large vehicle.

Why encourage people to ride into the most dangerous place?

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Guyz2010 [302 posts] 2 years ago
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I would suggest all that cycle on Bow roundabout RIDE IN MIDDLE OF THE ROAD make your space slow the other vehicles up. You have the right to ride safely, you have aright to LIVE.

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