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Council's new plans now include cycle paths and wider roads...

A petition by cyclists has led to council bosses considering a new cycle lane in Bath.

Regeneration plans by Bath and North East Somerset Council would, cyclists said, turn the A4 London road into a danger zone.

More than 660 people have signed the protest petition which demanded "a safe passage for cyclists all the way from Morrisons up to and over the Cleveland Place junction", instead of the pinch-points and badly laid-out parking spaces protesters said had been laid out in plans.

It adds: "The area should be regenerated by making it a pleasant place to explore on foot or by bike, not by squeezing in more cars."

Councillor Roger Symonds told the Bath Chronicle: "It seems that the campaign by cyclists to improve cycling on the London Road is being listened to.

“It now needs action by the council. If cycling was embedded in highways everyday work, there would be no need for campaigns such as the one on London Road."

A council spokesman said: "We were delighted with the response and welcome the comments made by cycling groups.

“Transport engineers are continuing to look at these comments and we are now looking at options to develop our plans further to strike a balance between the needs of cyclists, pedestrians, and vehicles.

"We have now updated the scheme to widen the carriageway on the approach to the signalled crossing at Cleveland Bridge (the main area of concern) so that a marked cycle lane can be included through this area, to prevent cyclists feeling they need to join the main flow of traffic."

Also in Bath, work has begun on the route linking Bathampton and Batheaston to Bath city centre, providing an alternative to the busy London Road.

The path, which has attracted £910,000 in Council funds and the Local Sustainable Transport Fund in investment, is connected to National Cycle Route 4.

Councillor Caroline Roberts told Now Bath: “Better cycle routes are one of the Council’s methods of increasing sustainable transport use, tackling congestion and improving air quality.

“More cycle improvement projects are planned, including Seven Dials, which will also encourage people to use bikes for their daily commutes and for leisure.”

After an unpromising start, having to be bribed by her parents to learn to ride without stabilisers, Sarah became rather keener on cycling in her university years, and was eventually persuaded to upgrade to proper road cycling by the prospect of a shiny red Italian bike, which she promptly destroyed by trapping a pair of knickers in the rear derailleur. Sarah writes about about cycling every weekend on road.cc.