Home
Public consultation to start early 2014 - scheme based on Bristol Cycling Campaign manifesto

Bristol looks likely to get a Dutch-style cycle network after the city council adopted an ambitious plan put forward by Bristol Cycling Campaign to build a grid of commuter routes across the city.

According to the Bristol Post, Bristol City Council will put the proposal out to public consultation early next year. The plans could be signed off by Mayor George Ferguson by next Spring.

Bristol Cycling Campaign described the news as “a bit of a first” and welcomed the chance to influence the building of bike routes instead of the council “producing something on their own which needs to be changed later”. 

Mark Bradshaw, Bristol’s assistant mayor for transport, planning, strategic housing and regeneration, said: "We are producing a new cycling strategy and have been working with Bristol Cycling Campaign on plans for the strategic cycle network for the city.

"We are aiming to consult on proposals this year for a launch in early 2014 which will include many of the issues highlighted in the campaign group's manifesto.

"There are more than £10 million of new cycling measures in the council's cycling programme, including the new cycling ambition fund to improve cross-city and river links. We will continue to work with the campaign group and other stakeholders in delivering a comprehensive network for Bristol."

In its Bristol Cycling Manifesto, Bristol Cycling Campaign called for an investment of £109 million over 12 years to quadruple the level of bike use in the city. The manifesto’s aims include 30 percent of commuter journeys in Bristol being made by bike.

Martin McDonnell, from Bristol Cycling Campaign, said that the council's support is a big success for the group.

He said: "It is a significant step and a bit of a first.

"We are really pleased to be working with the council over this instead of them producing something on their own which needs to be changed later.

"It looks likely to go ahead but the issue is funding. Whether it will come from local budgets or national budgets there needs to be long-term, secured financing."

Cycling projects in Bristol are currently funded by an allocation from the Cycle City Ambition project which put £7.8m the region’s way with a £3.3m local contribution.

That money will be used for a new pedestrian and cycle promenade across the city following the route of the River Avon; five new or improved river crossings for cyclists; the Cribbs Causeway to Emerson’s Green trunk cycle route in the North Fringe of Bristol; and the Seven Dials National Cycle Scheme in Bath City Centre.

Our official grumpy Northerner, John has been riding bikes for over 30 years since discovering as an uncoordinated teen that a sport could be fun if it didn't require you to catch a ball or get in the way of a hulking prop forward.

Road touring was followed by mountain biking and a career racing in the mud that was as brief as it was unsuccessful.

Somewhere along the line came the discovery that he could string a few words together, followed by the even more remarkable discovery that people were mug enough to pay for this rather than expecting him to do an honest day's work. He's pretty certain he's worked for even more bike publications than Mat Brett.

The inevitable 30-something MAMIL transition saw him shift to skinny tyres and these days he lives in Cambridge where the lack of hills is more than made up for by the headwinds.

16 comments

Avatar
Grubbythumb [61 posts] 3 years ago
0 likes

This is the same Bristol City Council who recently installed car parking spaces on a National Cycle Route, yes? Oh well, we're in safe hands then.

Nice ambition / sentiment, whether they deliver we will have to wait and see.

Avatar
congokid [297 posts] 3 years ago
0 likes

"Dutch-style network"

As in "beef-style" horseburgers?

Avatar
northstar [1107 posts] 3 years ago
0 likes

If it's just going to be paint don't bother.

Avatar
Matt eaton [741 posts] 3 years ago
0 likes

The key to making schemes like this sucessful is to give cycle at least equal priority compared to motor vehicles where the network intersects or joins the road network (which it will have to in many places). My biggest concern with this sort of scheme is that we end up with a network of routes that are not particually practical due to having to contantly give way to other traffic or cross roads like a pedestrian.

As we see in sucessfull cycle cities cycling needs to be the easiest option. Cycles should have priority over cars by default where routes intersect but that's probably too much to hope for in the UK (at least at this time).

Avatar
fluffy_mike [103 posts] 3 years ago
0 likes

There are plenty of signs that George Ferguson is willing to take on motorists and create a fairer transport system in Bristol. Good luck to him

Avatar
Guyz2010 [304 posts] 3 years ago
0 likes

"Bristol looks likely to get a Dutch-style cycle network after the city council adopted an ambitious plan put forward by Bristol Cycling Campaign to build a grid of commuter routes across the city."
Lets hope the £dutch style£ motorist adapt to along with crappy trenched road surfaces and send us on a detour commuter ride.
Give it a chance Bristol is so cycle friendly it may just work. Build a facility and we'll get the benefits.

Avatar
John Stevenson [270 posts] 3 years ago
0 likes
Grubbythumb wrote:

This is the same Bristol City Council who recently installed car parking spaces on a National Cycle Route, yes? Oh well, we're in safe hands then.

Fair play to Bristol, after we ran a story on that a few weeks ago, they admitted they'd stuffed up and were going to restore the lane ASAP.

Avatar
arfa [831 posts] 3 years ago
0 likes

Fair play to Bristol for giving it a go. After all it has everything the excuse makers use to argue against cycling (plenty of hills and wet weather) !

Avatar
arfa [831 posts] 3 years ago
0 likes

Fair play to Bristol for giving it a go. After all it has everything the excuse makers use to argue against cycling (plenty of hills and wet weather) !

Avatar
arfa [831 posts] 3 years ago
0 likes

Fair play to Bristol for giving it a go. After all it has everything the excuse makers use to argue against cycling (plenty of hills and wet weather) !

Avatar
Dr_Lex [370 posts] 3 years ago
0 likes

Maybe it's my browser, but it would have been convenient to have been able to enlarge the map by clicking on it. Can anyone post a link to the full size version?

Avatar
nowasps [508 posts] 3 years ago
0 likes
Dr_Lex wrote:

Maybe it's my browser, but it would have been convenient to have been able to enlarge the map by clicking on it. Can anyone post a link to the full size version?

http://bristolcyclingmanifesto.org.uk/images/Cycling-Tube-Map.png

Avatar
Aapje [242 posts] 3 years ago
0 likes
Dr_Lex wrote:

Maybe it's my browser, but it would have been convenient to have been able to enlarge the map by clicking on it. Can anyone post a link to the full size version?

Right click on the image and choose something like 'view image in new tab' (or the equivalent for your browser).

Avatar
Shades [320 posts] 3 years ago
0 likes

Bristol don't get it right all the time but you've got to give them some credit. My Bath to N Bristol commute is 18 miles with only 1 mile on road (not bad). I recently tried out the 'Concorde Way' (mixture of cycle paths and quiet roads) from N Bristol into the city centre and was surprisingly impressed. It wasn't the most direct route but because you are rarely stopped by a light or having to deal with traffic, it's pretty quick. Using Cyclestreets I found another path that cut out a busy car 'rat run'. Granted some of the directions could be better but once you learn the route, it's pretty quick.

Avatar
teaboy [310 posts] 3 years ago
0 likes
Shades wrote:

Bristol don't get it right all the time but you've got to give them some credit. My Bath to N Bristol commute is 18 miles with only 1 mile on road (not bad). I recently tried out the 'Concorde Way' (mixture of cycle paths and quiet roads) from N Bristol into the city centre and was surprisingly impressed. It wasn't the most direct route but because you are rarely stopped by a light or having to deal with traffic, it's pretty quick. Using Cyclestreets I found another path that cut out a busy car 'rat run'. Granted some of the directions could be better but once you learn the route, it's pretty quick.

The last sentance is one of the major problems with cycle infrastructure currently - there's little integration, and expecting people to "know the route" before they use it will not get more people cycling. Hopefully Bristol get this right, and it can act as a template for the rest of the country.

Avatar
Dr_Lex [370 posts] 3 years ago
0 likes
nowasps wrote:
Dr_Lex wrote:

Maybe it's my browser, but it would have been convenient to have been able to enlarge the map by clicking on it. Can anyone post a link to the full size version?

http://bristolcyclingmanifesto.org.uk/images/Cycling-Tube-Map.png

Thanks! Right-click doesn't work for me on the image.