Sheffield to spend £900,000 on Tour de France stage finish
Council hopes to bring £15 million to area

The Yorkshire city of Sheffield is to spend almost £900,000 hosting the finish of the second stage of next year’s Tour de France.

But Sheffield City Council says the race will bring £15 million in direct and indirect revenue to the area’s economy, according to the BBC.

After an opening stage starting in Leeds and finishing in Harrogate on July 5, the second day of the Tour starts in York and finishes in Sheffield, nipping into the Pennines and climbing Holme Moss on the way.

Sheffield Councillor Isobel Bowler said the cost was a "one-off investment in the city".

The council’s costs to host the stage finish include a £200,000 staging fee and £215,000 to be spent on marketing.

Ms Bowler, the Labour council's cabinet member for sport and leisure, said hosting therace in Sheffield would help "tourism, inward investment and profile".

She said: "It is not about one day or even one weekend."

Sheffield City Council expects about 250,000 spectators to line the 19-mile section of the route in the city.

It said the event would bring up to "£10m of direct economic benefit and £5m of place marketing value to the city".

The council’s cabinet will consider a report to approve the funding at a meeting next Wednesday.

Our official grumpy Northerner, John has been riding bikes for over 30 years since discovering as an uncoordinated teen that a sport could be fun if it didn't require you to catch a ball or get in the way of a hulking prop forward.

Road touring was followed by mountain biking and a career racing in the mud that was as brief as it was unsuccessful.

Somewhere along the line came the discovery that he could string a few words together, followed by the even more remarkable discovery that people were mug enough to pay for this rather than expecting him to do an honest day's work. He's pretty certain he's worked for even more bike publications than Mat Brett.

The inevitable 30-something MAMIL transition saw him shift to skinny tyres and these days he lives in Cambridge where the lack of hills is more than made up for by the headwinds.


badback [302 posts] 2 years ago

Hurrah. At least it's sunk in that hosting an event like this could actually bring some cash in !

About half the climbing is in the last thirty miles of the second stage so it should be a cracking finish.