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Tour winner would work for 'rival' Wiggins in the right race...

On his way to winning the Tour de France this summer, Team Sky’s Chris Froome faced almost-constant questions about the validity of his performance. Now he has told the Mail On Sunday that he thinks riders who use certain types of illegal performance enhancement should be thrown out of cycling forever.

“I definitely think there need to be harsher penalties for people who break the rules,” Froome told the paper. “I’m not so sure they should be allowed back into the sport at all.

Froome thinks cycling has cleaned up its act and the use of drugs and other methods to enhance performance has been reduced by systems such as the biological passport, but the sanctions could go further in clear-cut cases.

“Maybe I would implement lifetime bans for people who did blood bags or EPO, or something that you know is 100 per cent cheating,” he said. “I think in this day and age, if there are new cases, I would like to see those guys out of the sport.

“I have got faith in the testing procedures. We have had a few positives this year already and that goes to show those guys aren’t getting away with it anymore.

“Cases from 10 years ago, that doesn't concern me anymore. It was almost a different sport back then. It was so different to the sport we have today.
“I'm not going to try and justify why they did it then, but it was certainly more accepted than it is now, this day and age it's just not acceptable.'

Former World Anti-Doping Agency chief Dick Pound has said he still can’t watch the Tour de France until the UCI, which he alleges failed to tackle cycling’s drug problem, is reformed. But Froome says times have changed.

“In Dick Pound's time there wasn't the biological passport in play in the way it is today. That naturally lifts up a red flag when people do go outside natural levels.”

Froome is far from the first cyclist to call for lifetime bans for drug cheats. Those who remain sceptical of Froome's achievements will point out that Jan Ullrich, who was subsequently unmasked as a drugs cheat, made similar statements.

That Wiggins-Froome rivalry

Froome said that he feels the alleged rivalry between him and his team-mate, 2012 Tour de France winner Sir Bradley Wiggins is a bit of a media beat-up. He insists he was not attacking Wiggins in last year’s race.

“Possibly for one or two minutes out of the whole Tour de France, which is over 100 hours long, very temporarily, people may have perceived that, yes, but that wasn't the case at all,” he said

Froome portrays himself as a team player and said he will ride in support of Wiggins if it’s in the best interests of the team, and if the race has a course that favours Wiggins’ ability in the time trial over Froome’s climbing prowess.

“It is a good thing for the team, a privileged position for the team, having two Tour winners and having the possibility of being able to play those different cards,” he said.

“At the end of the day, people will need to remember, whatever race we go to, we will go there with a clear plan and, as professionals, we will stick to that plan, regardless of if we are mates or not.

“I would love to be given the opportunity again to try to go for it and I think that would depend very much on how the route is and who it suits.

“It is only right that if it is a flat time trial every second day, it suits Bradley and we ride for him, 100 per cent.”

Our official grumpy Northerner, John has been riding bikes for over 30 years since discovering as an uncoordinated teen that a sport could be fun if it didn't require you to catch a ball or get in the way of a hulking prop forward.

Road touring was followed by mountain biking and a career racing in the mud that was as brief as it was unsuccessful.

Somewhere along the line came the discovery that he could string a few words together, followed by the even more remarkable discovery that people were mug enough to pay for this rather than expecting him to do an honest day's work. He's pretty certain he's worked for even more bike publications than Mat Brett.

The inevitable 30-something MAMIL transition saw him shift to skinny tyres and these days he lives in Cambridge where the lack of hills is more than made up for by the headwinds.

26 comments

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Angelfishsolo [132 posts] 2 years ago
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I agree with him completely.

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Doper [69 posts] 2 years ago
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It is only a matter of time before Froome is banned for life.

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Super Domestique [1605 posts] 2 years ago
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Didn't see a comment like that coming ^

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themartincox [500 posts] 2 years ago
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Super Domestique wrote:

Didn't see a comment like that coming ^

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And so quickly as well!

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Tovarishch [59 posts] 2 years ago
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At least he's got rid of those awful sunglasses.

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Paul J [884 posts] 2 years ago
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Eh: "something you know is 100% cheating"? That seems an odd statement. Does that mean he knows of things that are "not 100% cheating"?

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Sam1 [220 posts] 2 years ago
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He means stuff that carries a lighter ban, like Xipamide - what Frank Schleck got just a year for, as the judgement wasn't that he hadn't ingested it 'intentionally'.

Whereas EPO - it's impossible to get that into your body unintentionally. No room for doubt as to intentions, with EPO.

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Leviathan [1986 posts] 2 years ago
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Sam1 wrote:

He means stuff that carries a lighter ban, like Xipamide - what Frank Schleck got just a year for, as the judgement wasn't that he hadn't ingested it 'intentionally'.

Whereas EPO - it's impossible to get that into your body unintentionally. No room for doubt as to intentions, with EPO.

Remember Nandrolone, everyone who took that pleaded not guilty and got off, yes you Greg Rudedski, because it was 'naturally' in the human body. Nandrolone yes, steroids, no. This could just kick off a race to use 'natural' human stimulants.

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jollygoodvelo [1422 posts] 2 years ago
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bikeboy76 wrote:
Sam1 wrote:

He means stuff that carries a lighter ban, like Xipamide - what Frank Schleck got just a year for, as the judgement wasn't that he hadn't ingested it 'intentionally'.

Whereas EPO - it's impossible to get that into your body unintentionally. No room for doubt as to intentions, with EPO.

Remember Nandrolone, everyone who took that pleaded not guilty and got off, yes you Greg Rudedski, because it was 'naturally' in the human body. Nandrolone yes, steroids, no. This could just kick off a race to use 'natural' human stimulants.

You guys do know that EPO is also naturally produced by the body, don't you?  3

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theclaw [73 posts] 2 years ago
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"Those who remain sceptical of Froome's achievements will point out that Jan Ullrich, who was subsequently unmasked as a drugs cheat, made similar statements."

Could Road.CC reference this - when and where Fat Jan made this statement?

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alexholt3 [53 posts] 2 years ago
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Doper wrote:

It is only a matter of time before Froome is banned for life.

Grow up.

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AWPeleton [3325 posts] 2 years ago
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Dont knock his glasses ! those of us old enough will remember "Chips" on tv and they were all the rage.

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The Rumpo Kid [589 posts] 2 years ago
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"Blood Passport"..."Ten years ago"...is Chris after the UCI Presidency? It's not too late for a Kenyan nomination if Pat's goalpost shifting goes through.

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billyman [148 posts] 2 years ago
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aviator glasses are very trendy.

I don't believe froome is a cheat, never have, the only way I can see the end of cheating is athletes are told lifetime bans for any means of cheating accidental or purposely anything at all suspicious and your out. by creating oh you might of accidentally git that substance in your system by taking some medicine for a cold our whatever opens up the opportunity for it to be abused its an open door for cheating, shut the door firmly, get real strict, get athletes to go out of their way to ensure they don't fall outside of the rules, mistakes well be made innocent people will lose out but I see no other way.

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Leviathan [1986 posts] 2 years ago
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The differences in molecular structure between artificial and naturally produced EPO can be detected.

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Karbon Kev [688 posts] 2 years ago
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Absolutely right attitude, I've said it for a long time, it is the ONLY way for the future of the sport imo ..

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MartinH [19 posts] 2 years ago
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Quote:

“It is only right that if it is a flat time trial every second day, it suits Bradley and we ride for him, 100 per cent.”

I see he's been working on his backhanded compliments!

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zanf [837 posts] 2 years ago
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The threat of lifetime bans do nothing to help break the Omertà.

Chris should just keep his head down and do what he does best

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mooleur [537 posts] 2 years ago
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Good for him for coming out with that (although completely unsurprising) - there is nothing wrong with being outspoken against cheating.

Froome comes across as a genuinely sound rider and a true cyclist with passion for what he does, will we always be plagued with speculation towards recognising hard work as the product of doping?

Every time someone wins, people are going to immediately climb on the "he won, must be a cheat" bandwagon - the lack of faith is annoying but what's more annoying is it's come to this.

I can't wait for the day that we don't have to put up with that trolling crap and we can all just enjoy natural sporting talent. Thankfully with riders like Cav, Kennaugh, Froom et al - that generation is finally starting to shine through.

Here's to the future. If you can't accept it, address your jealousy before shunning people that work VERY hard to do what they do.

(This is directed at no one particular, I'm just permanently annoyed at cheats and trolls)

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The Rumpo Kid [589 posts] 2 years ago
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zanf wrote:

The threat of lifetime bans do nothing to help break the Omertà

Agree totally.

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mooleur [537 posts] 2 years ago
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zanf wrote:

The threat of lifetime bans do nothing to help break the Omertà.

Chris should just keep his head down and do what he does best

Possibly because that's all they seem to end up as, threats. Maybe the cycle (ho hum) could be broken if strict justice was enforced properly.

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mooleur [537 posts] 2 years ago
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zanf wrote:

The threat of lifetime bans do nothing to help break the Omertà.

Possibly because that's all they seem to end up as, threats. Maybe the cycle (ho hum) could be broken if strict justice was enforced properly.

Stemstemstemstem <3

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The Rumpo Kid [589 posts] 2 years ago
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mooleur wrote:
zanf wrote:

The threat of lifetime bans do nothing to help break the Omertà.

Possibly because that's all they seem to end up as, threats. Maybe the cycle (ho hum) could be broken if strict justice was enforced properly.

Stemstemstemstem <3

I think it would just ensure the dirt stayed under the carpet. Did lifetime bans stop British Olympians doping?

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mooleur [537 posts] 2 years ago
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The Rumpo Kid wrote:

I think it would just ensure the dirt stayed under the carpet. Did lifetime bans stop British Olympians doping?

I couldn't comment on British Olympians - I don't actually know anything about any other sport other than cycling (and a bit of football but that's reserved for Sunday banter).

But surely going forward, cleaning out the sport from the top (getting rid of Pat being a wonderful example) would ensure a continuing example towards everyone filtering down?

I.e. if we can continue to test, and provide justice where testing proves positive - and the people doing the testing, and providing the justice aren't corrupt themselves, then the natural progression is an eventually clean sport. Which is why outspoken peers are important, the faces of cycling SHOULD be making comments like this, if only to ruffle feathers that well and truly need a good ruffling.

You can't keep things under a carpet that isn't there. Obviously what's happened in the past is unfortunate, but it's the past - we should move on, because there's really nothing anyone can do about it.

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The Rumpo Kid [589 posts] 2 years ago
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mooleur wrote:
The Rumpo Kid wrote:

I think it would just ensure the dirt stayed under the carpet. Did lifetime bans stop British Olympians doping?

I couldn't comment on British Olympians - I don't actually know anything about any other sport other than cycling (and a bit of football but that's reserved for Sunday banter).

But surely going forward, cleaning out the sport from the top (getting rid of Pat being a wonderful example) would ensure a continuing example towards everyone filtering down?

I.e. if we can continue to test, and provide justice where testing proves positive - and the people doing the testing, and providing the justice aren't corrupt themselves, then the natural progression is an eventually clean sport. Which is why outspoken peers are important, the faces of cycling SHOULD be making comments like this, if only to ruffle feathers that well and truly need a good ruffling.

You can't keep things under a carpet that isn't there. Obviously what's happened in the past is unfortunate, but it's the past - we should move on, because there's really nothing anyone can do about it.

I think a reduced sanction for people who give assistance to anti-doping agencies is a valuable tool in cleaning up the sport. Life bans remove the incentive to provide such assistance.

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mooleur [537 posts] 2 years ago
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The Rumpo Kid wrote:

I think a reduced sanction for people who give assistance to anti-doping agencies is a valuable tool in cleaning up the sport. Life bans remove the incentive to provide such assistance.

Ah true. I'm not sure where I sit with that one tbh, I'm just not sure if that's too much of a get out of jail free card for people who I [personally] view as the scourge of cycling and the scum of the earth. If it were up to me I'd ban them for life, no incentives or sanctions.. Purely because with every life ban for a cheat, a space opens for a young talent.

..But then if it helps to create a cleaner sport then... that speaks volumes too.

Proofs in the pudding I guess.

Now I'm confused.

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