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Osbornes presents cycling road casualty statistics and other info in graphic form

Osbornes Solicitors has produced a video and accompanying infographic focusing on issues associated with cycle safety, as well as highlighting some of the benefits of cycling and providing tips on how to stay safe.

The law firm says that despite the "startling figure" of nearly 3,000 cyclists being killed or seriously injured on the country's roads each year, "we are told that Britain holds one of the best road safety records in the world." 

It goes on: "There is clearly much that remains to be done before we have full confidence in the safety of our roads. To highlight the importance of cycling in our society, as well as shine a light on the risks cyclists face on our roads each day."

According to Osbornes, the video has been created using statistics from the Royal Society for the Prevention of Acccidents (RoSPA), although we've double checked the casualty figures which appear in turn to have been taken from the Department for Transport's Reported Road Casualties for Great Britain 2011 Annual Report, and therfore relate to the year 2010.

One thing that jumped out at us there, seeing the fatalities for that year presented in graphic form, was that two of the cyclist fatalities resulted from collisions in which a pedestrian was involved, and two with another cyclist.

The firm of solicitors says that of the total 17,000 cyclist casualty figure, "Most of these occur during the daytime and, shockingly, 20% of those killed are injured are children. It seems strange then, that Britain holds one of the best cycle safety rankings for children in Europe.

"Despite these risks, it adds, "the advantages of cycling must not be overlooked. In fact, the benefits gained from cycling actually far outweigh the dangers. For example, you can burn around 600 calories for every hour of cycling, which is great news for your health. It’s beneficial to environment too, with over 1000km to be travelled on the energy equivalent of a single litre of petrol."

Osbornes concludes: "There are still huge measures that must be implemented before cyclists and motorists can use UK roads safely together. Although the government is taking steps towards improvements it’s essential that road users do what they can to protect themselves from injury."

Born in Scotland, Simon moved to London aged seven and now lives in the Oxfordshire Cotswolds with his miniature schnauzer, Elodie. He fell in love with cycling one Saturday morning in 1994 while living in Italy when Milan-San Remo went past his front door. A daily cycle commuter in London back before riding to work started to boom, he's been news editor at road.cc since 2009. Handily for work, he speaks French and Italian. He doesn't get to ride his Colnago as often as he'd like, and freely admits he's much more adept at cooking than fettling with bikes.

9 comments

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farrell [1950 posts] 2 years ago
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Can someone explain to me how 75% of fatal or serious accidents occur in urban areas but 50% of fatal accidents occur in rural areas?

I'm sure it's explainable and I'm just being daft but that doesn't add up for me this morning.

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Bez [584 posts] 2 years ago
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Kerb. It's a kerb. The silly kents.

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Bez [584 posts] 2 years ago
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farrell wrote:

Can someone explain to me how 75% of fatal or serious accidents occur in urban areas but 50% of fatal accidents occur in rural areas?

I'm sure it's explainable and I'm just being daft but that doesn't add up for me this morning.

Because they're two different data sets, even though one is a subset of the other.

A simple example:

2 people killed on rural roads
2 people killed on urban roads
4 people seriously injured on urban roads

You now have 75% of KSIs on urban roads, 50% of fatalities on rural roads.

The point with rural roads is that although collisions are rarer, the high speeds mean they show higher fatality rates.

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djcritchley [181 posts] 2 years ago
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"80% of accidents happen in daylight", so cycle when it is dark and you'll be considerably safer.

Also if everybody drove tractors the number of cycling deaths would drop like a stone.

 35

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Dr_Lex [239 posts] 2 years ago
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Any idea of why Osbornes are publishing this? Are they a noted Solicitor resource for BTC/BC etc? Or has one of the senior partners just bought a rather nice Pinarello after talking to his dentist?

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felixcat [442 posts] 2 years ago
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In the 1930s the number killed on the road was as high as 13,000 p.a.
Since then it has steadily declined to under 3,000 p.a. now.
Does anyone seriously maintain the roads are really getting safer and safer?
In my cycling lifetime of fifty years I would say the roads have got more and more dangerous, and I would guess most cyclists would agree.
I don't think that low casualty rates show that the roads are safe.
If you disagree, perhaps you would allow children the same amount of outdoor freedom as I had, and as children in the 30s had.

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WolfieSmith [1244 posts] 2 years ago
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I would expect average speed has increased in 30mph areas. A combination of over reliance on modern brakes, 40 years of '0-60mph in...' Motoring ads and those big kids on Top Gear has created a level of self entitlement which means even if the average speed in urban areas is below 30mph most of that is generated by slowing for junctions and double parking and the rest if the time everyone is bowling along at 35-38mph.

If you check the death rate below and above 30mph is pretty easy to see that speed is the culprit not sharing per se.

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andyp [1436 posts] 2 years ago
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Never mind the 'data'. I can't get past that voice. It's making me want to punch people.

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whatter [4 posts] 2 years ago
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One of the best cycle safety ratings for children in Europe - really? Is this 'per mile', or on deaths/injuries per 100,000 children? If the former, I'll recalibrate my view of our roads; if the latter, well, surely that's about parents not letting children cycle because it's too darned dangerous.