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News welcomed by cycling groups in the city

Some of the most dangerous junctions in Manchester are to be reviewed, with £200,000 earmarked for improvements, in a move that has been welcomed by the city's cycling groups.

One of the first to be looked at will be that of Wilmslow Road, Wilbraham Road, and Moseley Road in Fallowfield, which local cyclists say is treacherous, and located in one of the busiest areas of South Manchester.

Manchester Wheelers’ Club say they welcome the council's plans, which are due to be completed by March 2014.

“It is extremely important to all of us that cyclist safety is taken seriously by Manchester City Council so it is reassuring to see them looking at new measures,” club vice-president Viv Slack told Mancunian Matters.

“The Wilmslow Road area is a popular route for many cyclists but always feels fairly dangerous with cars and buses pulling in and out of parking spaces and side roads, often without checking mirrors or indicating.

“If segregated junctions for cyclists has improved safety in other countries, I am glad it is something being considered for Manchester.”

The plans include cycle lanes and cycle-only traffic lights.

The area is popular with students and it's estimated that more than 2,000 cyclists pass through the area every day, making it ten times as busy as any other cycle route in the city.

Viv Slack said that the decision to improve the junction is progress, but that more needs to be done to improve roads in the city. Previously a lot of resources have gone into cycle hubs in the centre of town, but she says that this should not be the main focus.

“Ideally we would love to see some dedicated cycle routes during rush hour as has been implemented in many big cities,” she said.

“We often support charities working to improve road safety with riding events and raising sponsorship.

“Encouraging cycling by providing secure lock-ups and changing facilities is nice but what we really need are safer roads.

“Anything the council can do to decrease those risks is really important to all of us and our families.”

After an unpromising start, having to be bribed by her parents to learn to ride without stabilisers, Sarah became rather keener on cycling in her university years, and was eventually persuaded to upgrade to proper road cycling by the prospect of a shiny red Italian bike, which she promptly destroyed by trapping a pair of knickers in the rear derailleur. Sarah writes about about cycling every weekend on road.cc.