Boris U-turn over bikes on the DLR

Trial will see cycles carried during off-peak hours

by Sarah Barth   March 17, 2013  

London's Docklands provided a spectacular backdrop (copyright Simon MacMichael)

The Mayor of London has executed a U-turn on his previous policy by allowing a trial that will permit bikes to be carried on the Docklands Light Railway.

Previously, Boris said that there were too many elevated platforms, lifts were too small and the bikes could cause problems it emergency evacuations.

But soon the DLR will be allowing bikes during off-peak hours for a trial period.

Even in May last year, managing director of London Underground Mike Brown, said: "We still feel that allowing full size bicycles on the train and stations would be inappropriate.

"The DLR system was not originally designed or built for the carriages of bicycles," The Wharf newspaper reported.

Caroline Pidgeon, leader of the Liberal Democrats at the London Assembly, said: "For a long time I have argued that if bikes can be taken on most trains at off peak hours then they should also be allowed on the DLR as well outside commuter hours," she said.

"This trial is long overdue and will benefit many people, both north and south of the Thames, who want to get around London by bike."

The move comes at the same time as the government set out its vision for integrating cycling, walking and public transport.

The 'Door to Door' proposals, unveiled by Transport Minister Norman Baker this week, include better information about various transport options, more affordable and simpler ticketing, and better connecting services.

As he launched Door to Door, Mr Baker explained that for journeys of five miles or less, 54 per cent of people still drive, and for longer journeys, it was 80 per cent.

Mr Baker said: "The benefits of improving the door-to-door journey will be felt in a number of ways:

  •     by increasing use of sustainable transport we can help protect the environment by reducing carbon emissions and improving air quality;
  •     by improving connectivity and interchange we can help to support economic growth as we better link our businesses and markets and ensure public transport journeys are fast and reliable;
  •     by providing a well-connected and accessible transport system that is safe and secure we can help improve public health, quality of life and wider well-being; and
  •     by integrating the door-to-door journey as a whole we are delivering a good deal for the traveller by helping to make travel more reliable and affordable.

2 user comments

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This is of pretty limited use as you're not allowed to bring a bike in and out of Bank Station.

posted by bikewithnoname [26 posts]
18th March 2013 - 11:27

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A bike on the dlr is probably less likely to be a danger in an emergency evacuation than most train's i've been on. The walkways are wider, the exit area and doors are wider and off peak they aren't too full either. I never understood why they didn't let bikes on in the first place. Although the elevated platforms bit makes sense.

posted by md6 [132 posts]
19th March 2013 - 15:06

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