Lance Armstrong offers to help 'clean up cycling'

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The disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong has been given a dealine of February 6 to testify to the USADA as to the full extent of his doping.

Amstrong's lawyer has said that the banned rider will work with US doping authorities and cycling officials to help 'clean up cycling', adding that the brunt of that work should fall to anti doping officials and the sport's governing bodies.

Earlier this week the lawyer was sent a letter by the USADA's attorney William Bock, setting a February 6 deadline for a testimony under oath.

Tim Herman, acting for Armstrong, has said that this will be possible.

"As you have candidly confirmed, USADA has no authority to investigate, prosecute or otherwise involve itself with the other 95% of cycling competitors," he wrote, according to Sky News.

"Thus, in order to achieve the goal of 'cleaning up cycling,' it must be WADA and the UCI who have overall authority to do so."

The testimony is expected to clarify what Armstrong told Oprah Winfrey in a televised interview; namely that he took the performance enhancing drugs EPO and testosterone and made use of blood transfusions in each of his seven Tour de France 'wins'.

Some have speculated that full cooperation with the USADA could reduce Armstrong's ban from lifetime to around eight years.

But there is still uncertainty as to the veracity of his testimony. USADA's CEO Travis Tygart said in an interview for CBS, scheduled to be screened tomorrow, that he was unsure that Armstrong's claims of a clean comeback in 2009 held water.

"His blood tests in 2009, 2010 ... one to a million chance that it was due to something other than doping," Tygart said.