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World governing body wants feedback from riders, teams, race organisers and sponsors (but not fans or media) and wants it by next Monday

The UCI has revealed that it has written to “all of cycling’s stakeholders” to ask for feedback on its recently announced Stakeholder Consultation – though it has given them less than a week to respond, hardly time for any considered ideas to be formed, and its definition of “stakeholder” isn’t all-encompassing, excluding for example media and fans alike.

In a press release issued this morning, the governing body said “letters have been sent to riders, teams, race organisers, national federations, administrators, sponsors, industry representatives, anti-doping organisations and sports bodies, asking for their comments on a proposed list of topics that have been divided into four main pillars of discussion: globalisation, anti-doping, riders and sports calendar.

“Stakeholders have until 10th December to send their comments and suggestions about the list of topics back to the UCI, which will then finalise and announce the format of the Stakeholder Consultation.”

The consultation will be undertaken in the first quarter of the new year and is separate from the Independent Commission, details of which were announced last week, which will investigate the UCI’s role in relation to the United States Anti-Doping Agency’s investigation of the US Postal scandal.

The UCI’s announcement comes the day after the conclusion of the two-day Change Cycling Now summit in London, which also involved representatives of two of the key stakeholder groups the governing body is looking to engage – Jonathan Vaughters, currently head of the professional teams’ association, the AIGCP, and Gianni Bugno, president of the professional riders’ association, the CPA.

Unsurprisingly, the UCI’s press release makes no mention of the Change Cycling Now summit, whose delegates included two members of the Cycling Fans’ Voice group which has been set up to call for fans to be given a say in how the sport is run.

UCI President Pat McQuaid commented: “We will work together to tackle issues of concern and build a bright future for cycling. We will look at how we can continue the process of globalising cycling, encourage wider participation and make the sport even more interesting for spectators.”

Without asking the spectators themselves, apparently.
 

Born in Scotland, Simon moved to London aged seven and now lives in the Oxfordshire Cotswolds with his miniature schnauzer, Elodie. He fell in love with cycling one Saturday morning in 1994 while living in Italy when Milan-San Remo went past his front door. A daily cycle commuter in London back before riding to work started to boom, he's been news editor at road.cc since 2009. Handily for work, he speaks French and Italian. He doesn't get to ride his Colnago as often as he'd like, and freely admits he's much more adept at cooking than fettling with bikes.