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Team Sky coach says he can't remember the crash that left him with bleeding on the brain...

The Team Sky and British Cycling head coach who was left with bleeding on the brain following a collision has said that although he remembers nothing of the crash, he believes his helmet saved his life - but he wouldn't force those who didn't want to to wear one.

When asked what he remembered from the incident earlier in November, he told BBC Sport: "Nothing. From 8.40 in the morning until 12.20 in the afternoon, not a thing."

"For me it [wearing a helmet] was very important, but that is a personal thing," he added.

"A lot of people have serious accidents with helmets and without. On this occasion I was glad I had a helmet on.

"But that's a personal thing, it is like a bike. You buy a particular kind of bike and a particular kind of helmet. For me, it saved my life.

"I don't feel 100 per cent at the moment, I am just sitting in the stands, quite relaxed. It is going to take time, the doctors said that."

Sutton, who suffered bruising and bleeding on the brain and a fractured cheekbone in the incident, attended the Track Worlds at the Sir Chris Hoy Stadium yesterday. 

He added that there needed to be a political will to improve cycling road safety.

He said: "I think there needs to be more awareness.

"It has become very corporate, there are so many more people on bikes.

"We need to have better infrastructures, we have the best cyclists in the world in Manchester but we do not have the network to cater for them and it is something that needs to be looked at from a government point of view."

Sutton's comment differ from Bradley Wiggin's during the London 2012 Olympics, who in response to hearing that cyclist Dan Harris had been killed near the stadium, said:  "Ultimately, if you get knocked off and you don’t have a helmet on, then you can’t argue. You can get killed if you don’t have a helmet on.

"You shouldn’t be riding along with iPods and phones and things on. You have lights on. Once there are laws passed for cyclists then you are protected and you can say, ‘well, I have done everything to be safe."

After an unpromising start, having to be bribed by her parents to learn to ride without stabilisers, Sarah became rather keener on cycling in her university years, and was eventually persuaded to upgrade to proper road cycling by the prospect of a shiny red Italian bike, which she promptly destroyed by trapping a pair of knickers in the rear derailleur. Sarah writes about about cycling every weekend on road.cc.