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With only two months to go looks set to overtake the 107 deaths recorded in the whole of 2011

The death toll for cyclists in Britain is thought to have risen to 105 this year, with the latest casualty being a 94 year old man who was knocked off his electric bike in Crowle, South Yorkshire, by a Seat Ibiza car being driven by a 29-year-old man.

In the same week that Bradley Wiggins was hit by a van driver, and Shane Sutton, GB cycling team's head coach, was left with a fractured cheek bone and bleeding on the brain following a collision, six more cyclists died on Britain's roads.

On Tuesday, Sofoklis Kostoulas, 31, from Bow, east London, died in hospital eight days after being crushed beneath a lorry’s wheels in the capital. He was the 12th Londoner to die this year. He was involved in a collision with a tipper truck in Bethnal Green Road as he cycled to work around 6.40am on October 29.

It is thought Mr Kostoulas was caught between the lorry and parked cars.

In addition to the 94-year-old, a 67-year-old rider from Didcot died after a collision involving a Renault Megane on November 4. Police are appealing for witnesses.

On November 2, there were two more fatalities. Adam Bennett, 41, who was in a hit-and-run crash with a van as he cycled in Bruntingthorpe in Leicestershire, died in hospital five days after the incident. A 68-year-old man has been arrested. And in Cheltenham, Robert Chaplin, 56, died from the injuries he sustained to his leg, hip and pelvis when he was run over by a tipper trick in Cheltenham.

The day before, on November 1, 75-year-old Sam Sloan was killed in a crash with a car in Portadown in Northern Ireland.

In 2011 there were 107 recorded deaths of cyclists on the roads. With 105 in the first 10 months of 2012, the rate looks set to increase this year.

 

 

After an unpromising start, having to be bribed by her parents to learn to ride without stabilisers, Sarah became rather keener on cycling in her university years, and was eventually persuaded to upgrade to proper road cycling by the prospect of a shiny red Italian bike, which she promptly destroyed by trapping a pair of knickers in the rear derailleur. Sarah writes about about cycling every weekend on road.cc.