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Woman hit head-on by "reckless" cyclist on blind corner...

A female cyclist who suffered cuts and bruises when she was hit by another cyclist on the Bristol to Bath railway path has said that riders should slow down to avoid potentially life-threatening injuries.

Kim Tanner, 28, was involved in a collision with a female cyclist on the Clay Bottom bend of the path. 

She told the Bristol Evening Post: "I was involved in a head-on collision with another cyclist who was wearing full racing gear and standing up on her pedals.

"She was hurtling towards me on the wrong side of a blind bend despite there being signs clearly warning cyclists to slow down and keep left. I had no time to avoid her.

"Despite my protests that she was travelling too fast and on the wrong side of the path, the woman simply said, 'these things happen'.

"I began to shake, and burst into tears. I had to phone my husband to come and pick me up as I was too shaken up to cycle home."

Mrs Tanner said that she still finds it hard to get on her bike.

She said: "The trauma of the incident is still causing me to shake and feel physically sick at times.

"I consider myself a pretty strong person. But when I got back on my bike to cycle to work on Monday, I was jumpy and anxious when anything came into my vision.

"As I approached the bend where the incident occurred, I began to feel nauseous, and slowed down to an almost complete stop.

"I feel my confidence may take some time to return and I hope that the woman who caused the collision will have learnt something from it. I hope she will refrain from such reckless cycling in future – especially if she could see the photo of my injuries."

The 13 mile off-road path has 'slow' signs at points along its length. It is open to walkers and cyclists, and becomes very busy during commuter rush hours and on sunny weekends. It was built more than 30 years ago by Sustrans on the site of the former Midland Railway.

Most of the path is owned by Bristol City Council, South Gloucestershire Council or Bath and North East Somerset Council.

After an unpromising start, having to be bribed by her parents to learn to ride without stabilisers, Sarah became rather keener on cycling in her university years, and was eventually persuaded to upgrade to proper road cycling by the prospect of a shiny red Italian bike, which she promptly destroyed by trapping a pair of knickers in the rear derailleur. Sarah writes about about cycling every weekend on road.cc.