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Early Day Motion has already been signed by 48 MPs

The CTC has joined British Cycling to call on MPs to support an early day motion (EDM) that calls for a review of the criminal justice system for those injured on the roads.

The EDM, tabled by MP Julian Huppert, chair of the All Party Parliamentary Cycling Group, asks that:

That this House... calls on the Ministry of Justice to review carefully the evidence they have submitted and undertake a comprehensive review of each part of the criminal justice system, from crash investigation standards through to sentencing guidelines, to ensure that it is fairer for cyclists, pedestrians and other road users who are hurt or seriously injured on the country's roads.

The EDM is based on a campaign by British Cycling that we reported on back in June, which called for a comprehensive sentencing review, following a number of recent cases in which motorists convicted in connection with the death of cyclists have received what many have viewed as lenient sentences.

The CTC has run a campaign, Stop SMIDSY (Sorry Mate, I Didn't See You) to record the inadequacies in the way the criminal justice system treats cyclists who have been involved in road crashes.

Cyclists can tell of their experiences and campaign for fairer treatment and proportionate punishments for drivers at fault.

The CTC is now working with British Cycling and other organisations to call for a review of all aspects of the current criminal justice system.

British Cycling backed the EDM in July, based on evidence from its campaign page, 'Your bad driving stories'.

Now the CTC is on board too, and urges cyclists to check whether their MP has signed the EDM (at time of writing, 48 have signed - check here) and if not, write them a letter urging them to.

Not all MPs can sign EDMs, so it's worth checking whether yours is a minister or parliamentary private secretary, which would exclude them from signing. Find out who your MP is and write to them here.

An EDM is a formal request for a debate in Parliament. Few actually get debated, but their existence helps drum up media coverage of an issue and allows MPs to show their support for particular campaigns.

After an unpromising start, having to be bribed by her parents to learn to ride without stabilisers, Sarah became rather keener on cycling in her university years, and was eventually persuaded to upgrade to proper road cycling by the prospect of a shiny red Italian bike, which she promptly destroyed by trapping a pair of knickers in the rear derailleur. Sarah writes about about cycling every weekend on road.cc.