Home
Pat McQuaid to examine USADA case file

The UCI President Pat McQuaid has said that the cycle sport governing body has 'no intention' to appeal against the USADA decision to ban Lance Armstrong for life.

Late last month, the USADA formally banned Armstrong for life, and disqualified him from all results since 1 August 1998. Armstrong says that only the UCI has the power to sanction him and protests his innocence.

The UCI is yet to receive the case file on the decision, but McQuaid told Reuters that there was no reason not to believe it was all in order.

He said: "The UCI has no reason to assume that a full case file does not exist. They (USADA) have a full case file so let them provide the full case file.

"And unless the USADA's decision and case file give serious reasons to do otherwise, the UCI has no intention to appeal to CAS (Court of Arbitration for Sport) or not to recognise the USADA's sanctions on Lance Armstrong.

"We need to examine the decision and the file in order to deal with it properly and this is going to take some time. However, I can assure you that this will be prioritised.

"The reason the UCI is seeking the file is that we want to provide a timely response and not delay matters any further than necessary. The sooner we receive the full decision and case file the sooner we can provide its response."

McQuaid also addressed the allegations made by Armstrong's former team mate Tyler Hamilton in his book, "The Secret Race: Inside the Hidden World of the Tour de France: Doping, Cover-ups and Winning at All Costs". Hamilton claims that Armstrong failed a dope test in 2001 but that it was covered up by the UCI, an allegation that has dogged the rider.

"There is nothing new. There was no cover up in 2001 and we see no evidence to support such allegation," he said.

He added: "When people time the arrival of books to meet certain situations I question what their real motivations are. Is it to make money?"

 

 

 

After an unpromising start, having to be bribed by her parents to learn to ride without stabilisers, Sarah became rather keener on cycling in her university years, and was eventually persuaded to upgrade to proper road cycling by the prospect of a shiny red Italian bike, which she promptly destroyed by trapping a pair of knickers in the rear derailleur. Sarah writes about about cycling every weekend on road.cc.