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Tell pro-cycling groups that his death should not be used for political point-scoring

The family of a cyclist killed by the Olympic Park by a bus carrying members of the media have called upon cycle campaigners not to exploit his death for political point-scoring.

Dan Harris died on Wednesday when he was hit by a coach in East London, leading to widespread discussion about the safety of roads for cyclists in the capital, especially as it came at the height of Olympic successes for British athletes.

When asked about it, Bradley Wiggins called for helmets to be made compulsory by law, and even John Humphrys had his say.

But in a statement released via the Metropolitan police, Mr Harris's family said: "Our family do not want Daniel's name associated with any protests, or used for any political point-scoring whatsoever by pro-cycling lobbyists or similar factions.

"Everyone who knew Dan loved him for his sense of humour, fun and adventure,' they said.

"He was an experienced cyclist and we want it to be known that he was wearing a helmet.

"He wasn't just cycling because of the high profile it has received because of the Olympics, he was just going backwards and forwards to work as he always did.

"In the past he has cycled across Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam and back.'

“We as a family would like to thank everyone for their kind words of support over our tragic and devastating loss of a wonderful son and boyfriend,” their statement said.

“This is for all the friends and strangers who have said some truly beautiful things about our boy."

A post-mortem examination gave the cause of Mr Harris’s death as multiple injuries. The bus driver, a 65-year-old man, was arrested at the scene on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving, and has been questioned by police. He has been bailed to return to an east London police station late this month.

 

After an unpromising start, having to be bribed by her parents to learn to ride without stabilisers, Sarah became rather keener on cycling in her university years, and was eventually persuaded to upgrade to proper road cycling by the prospect of a shiny red Italian bike, which she promptly destroyed by trapping a pair of knickers in the rear derailleur. Sarah writes about about cycling every weekend on road.cc.