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List published as CTC and Sustrans call for government money to improve safety of cyclists nationwide, not just in London

Manchester’s ‘Curry Mile’ on Wilmslow Road has been named the city’s biggest blackspot for cyclists, according to figures compiled by personal injury solicitors Levenes, which specialises, among other things, in helping injured cyclists including through a dedicated website, cycleinjury.co.uk.

The law firm, which based its research on government data, says that since 2006 some 65 cyclists have been injured on the stretch of road between Moss Lane East and Claremont Road, according to a report in the Manchester Evening News.

Levenes partner Tim Beasely commented: “Accidents happen for many reasons, but when you get some many crashes on one particular location, action should be taken."

Yesterday’s Budget from Chancellor George Osborne provided £15 million for Transport for London to make conditions safer at junctions in the capital, but as both Sustrans and CTC pointed out, cycle safety is not an issue exclusive to London, and money also needs to be spent elsewhere – a point illustrated by Levenes’ research.

Last year, Greater Manchester Council successfully bid for £4.9 million from the Local Sustainable Travel Fund in connection with cycling projects in the city. That money, however, will go towards initiatives such as cycle parking, including secure compounds, as well as cycle training.

The Manchester Evening News has reported, however, that the council does intend to remove parked cars from Oxford Road – the continuation of Wilmslow Road to the north, towards the city centre – as well as introducing segregated cycle lanes there.

Pete Abel of local cycle campaigners Love Your Bike told the newspaper: "Many people enjoy cycling in Greater Manchester and find it a safe and healthy activity.

"However, cycle lanes, facilities and respect for all road users can be improved.

"Love Your Bike encourages all local authorities to help make cycling easier and safer so that even more Mancunians can enjoy the benefits of cycling."

Councillor Paul Andrews, the council’s executive member for neighbourhood services, said: "We’d like to encourage more people to use their bikes while making sure it’s safe for them to do so," pointing out that some 50 locations in the city already have 20mph speed limits and that it is planned to extend that limit to all residential streets other than major roads.

He also said that the council intended to bid for more money for segregated cycle lanes, adding: "As well as this, we have provided free cycle safety training for more than 500 people, many of whom have told us they now feel much more confident."

Dave Newton, transport strategy manager at Transport for Greater Manchester, added: "We are committed to encouraging more people to take up cycling.

“There are a variety of factors that can affect road safety, and we are working to deliver improvements where we can by designing in a variety of cycling measures."

Manchester’s most dangerous junctions according to Levenes

Junction                                    Cyclists injured since 2006

Wilmslow Road/Wilbraham Road/Moseley Road              25
Wilmslow Road/Walmer Street                            25
Deansgate/Peter Street                                 19
Kingsway/Chester Road/Edge Lane                        16
Dickenson Road/Stanley Grove/Stockport Road            16
High Lane/Barlow Moor Road/Sandy Lane                  16
Wilmslow Road/Great Western Street                     14
Wilmslow Road/Claremont Road                           12
Bolton Road/Manchester Road roundabout                 12
Wilmslow Road/Moss Lane East                           11

Born in Scotland, Simon moved to London aged seven and now lives in the Oxfordshire Cotswolds with his miniature schnauzer, Elodie. He fell in love with cycling one Saturday morning in 1994 while living in Italy when Milan-San Remo went past his front door. A daily cycle commuter in London back before riding to work started to boom, he's been news editor at road.cc since 2009. Handily for work, he speaks French and Italian. He doesn't get to ride his Colnago as often as he'd like, and freely admits he's much more adept at cooking than fettling with bikes.