100 Greatest Cycling Climbs: the sequel coming in May

"…a sterling effort and one made much better by the addition of the table for ticking off the climbs and recording your time," we said, the first time around

by nick_rearden   February 13, 2012  

Another 100 Cycling Climbs by Simon Warren

Author Simon Warren presents a second helping of Britain's most challenging roads to tackle by bicycle. Published by Frances Lincoln Ltd on 3rd May 2012, the book is called 'Another 100 Greatest Cycling Climbs' and we're already dying to see justice done to the hills we feel were missed first time around.

First off let's see what the publisher has to say:

"Longer! Higher! Steeper! Packaged in the same handy pocket size as the bestselling 100 Greatest Cycling Climbs, here are another 100 killer hills from the tip of Cornwall to the Highlands of Scotland, via the East Anglian peninsula and the Isle of Man. The climbs tick all the same boxes as the original 100, and are often more challenging. There will certainly be quite a few surprises as these climbs are lesser known and further off the beaten track. One thing that remains the same is that they all pack a serious punch and they'll all introduce you to more of the wonderful scenery of Britain. So just when you thought it was safe to go back to riding on the flat, here come another 100 Climbs. Enjoy."

Leaving aside the intrigue of what climbing Simon Warren has found in East Anglia, we have our own local West Country challenges to lobby for as the only criticism we could find when we reviewed the book 100 Greatest Cycling Climbs when it was published in 2010 was that it could really have done with being door step sized and called 500 Greatest Cycling Climbs. Our islands may lack the sheer magnitude of the Alps, Dolomites and Pyrenees but Dear Old Blighty certainly does make up for it with it with quality and quantity. As our Dave Atkinson posted in his review:

"We were surprised to see that the Gospel Pass near Abergavenny didn't make the grade, and nor did the climb to the Radar station on Lowther Hill in the Southern Uplands of Scotland which is, at 725 metres, the highest navigable road in the UK. Okay, the last bit is technically private, but we reckon it should still go in. In fact, Scotland is quite poorly represented relatively speaking, which might have more to do with the location of the author than the quality of the climbs…"

Well, it seems 120,000 copies sold says that readers mostly appreciated the slim and portable format which, of course, will fit perfectly in a jersey pocket and it's given the author a good couple of riding seasons to research another lung-busting one hundred. Bring it.

While we're on the subject, another book is already out which focuses purely on Scotland and the Scottish Lowlands at that. "The Cyclist's Guide to Hillclimbs on Scottish Lowland Roads" by John H McKendrick is in the house already for review but we'll post on that any minute now...

 

Another 100 Greatest Cycling Climbs by Simon Warren
Published by Frances Lincoln Ltd

£ 8.99 9780711232655 Paperback
160 x 110mm, 176pp
200 colour photographs and maps

Details: franceslincoln.co.uk

12 user comments

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I thought I might actually some day get somewhere near completing the 100, now I am totally f......

posted by pmr [160 posts]
14th February 2012 - 1:48

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pmr wrote:
I thought I might actually some day get somewhere near completing the 100, now I am totally f......

... fankful he's produced a sequel?

Wink

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posted by Simon_MacMichael [7839 posts]
14th February 2012 - 2:35

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Been waiting since the last one for another. Now they just need arranging by county. 1 book for each! I wonder if the new ones are chosen for their "quality" rather than "status". I understand and agree with the rational for the 1st book but some of those climbs were a bit feeble compared with others. Hope it out on time. I took the 1st bok on holiday last year and it was great for filling time in those boring bits of a family holiday. Rosedale with the only warm up being riding down it wasn't fun though.

posted by mattsccm [239 posts]
14th February 2012 - 9:43

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I'll never go recording my times - half of those climbs I have done have been on Audaxes or saddlebag tours! 20 litre carradice is not what you want keeping your time up.

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posted by G-bitch [302 posts]
14th February 2012 - 10:59

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oooh great news. let's hope simon updates his ride time in book one for the horseshoe. i think he quoted 22 minutes or something, when i know full well he's done it in around 10.30 or so.

posted by pj [138 posts]
14th February 2012 - 21:57

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pj wrote:
oooh great news. let's hope simon updates his ride time in book one for the horseshoe. i think he quoted 22 minutes or something, when i know full well he's done it in around 10.30 or so.

Paul, that may be Simon's time from Pentrefelin at the bottom of the pass (as used for the Horseshoe Pass Challenge).

He clocked 10:39 in the WFRC Horseshoe Hill Climb last year, which is quite a bit shorter and starts by the Britannia Inn (but still damn hard work!).

Looking forward to Volume II...

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posted by Simon E [1885 posts]
14th February 2012 - 23:36

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£6.38 pre order on amazon at the moment.

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posted by cidermart [454 posts]
15th February 2012 - 13:18

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Isn't the highest road in the UK actually the 'Ministry Road' to the radar station on Great Dun Fell in Cumbria at 848m, usually excluded from lists of climbs because it also is not a public road for some of its length?

posted by hillboy [11 posts]
16th February 2012 - 13:21

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hillboy wrote:
Isn't the highest road in the UK actually the 'Ministry Road' to the radar station on Great Dun Fell in Cumbria at 848m, usually excluded from lists of climbs because it also is not a public road for some of its length?

yeah you might be right. legal to cycle up to about 760m according to bikehike Smile

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posted by Dave Atkinson [7232 posts]
16th February 2012 - 13:38

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I was hoping for there to be a few more local ones to myself.
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Then again, I do live in northern Holland. Liar

posted by monkeytrousers [33 posts]
16th February 2012 - 14:39

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Edition #1 is by far the best cycling book on my shelves - this one is going to fly out of the shops....... guaranteed.

cheers m'dears

2011 Rose Pro-SL 3000 Road
2006 Lemond Alpe d'Huez Broken
1997 Marin Sausaulito Urban bimbling/shopper
1980 Orbea project

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posted by daviddb [120 posts]
16th February 2012 - 19:54

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The first edition of all the all-UK book is great and the Scottish Lowland Roads version is similar in format with 36 celebrated climbs north of the border. However, be warned, this is a tiny publication and because the page size is very small (not much bigger than a beer mat) the type is miniscule. It is hard to read. I don't wear glasses but had to employ a magnifying glass to enlarge the type. The content is well put together otherwise and I don't see any errors or mis-directions among the text.
The publishers have used longer route guides than the ones featured in the earlier parts of the series and I fear they have reduced the typesize to accommodate it all. Other than that this is a great training tool - tick off the hills as you do them. Also, handy publication to dip into for inspiration while on holiday.

posted by Eyebrox [12 posts]
19th February 2012 - 1:01

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