Home
Road safety and cycling campaigners to highlight dangers to vulnerable road users

Cycling and road safety campaigners will be joined by the Green Party’s mayoral candidate Jenny Jones on Monday evening to protest against the policies of Transport for London (TfL) that they insist are putting vulnerable road users including cyclists and pedestrians at risk.

The protest, which starts at 6pm on the evening of Monday 9 January, starts 6pm at the junction of York Way and Pentonville Road where 24-year-old student Deep Lee was killed by a lorry in October last year.

After her death, TfL was accused of having failed to act upon a report that it had itself commissioned that made a series of recommendations regarding safety at the junction in question, although that was primarily focused on pedestrians.

Shortly before Christmas, TfL announced a strategic review of the junction, which was also the site of a candlelit vigil attended by the families and friends of some of the 16 cyclists killed on the capital’s roads last year.

Next Monday’s protest follows news that TfL is removing pedestrian crossings at various locations in London, as well as reducing the time available for those on foot to cross the road safely.

According to the website of the accesible transport campaign group Transport for All, so far TfL has removed six crossings and is consulting regarding proposals to take away a further 58, in line with Mayor of London Boris Johnson’s much-criticised prioritisation of smoothing traffic flow.

Transport for All maintains that removing the crossings and reducing crossing times puts vulnerable groups such as the elderly, the disabled, cyclists and children disproportionately at risk, but points out that it affects all those seeking to cross the road on foot.

It is calling on Mr Johnson to halt the programme of removal of crossings until full consultation has been carried out with disabled people living close to the locations affected, and is also pressing for a full investigation of “the risks and inconvenience to all pedestrians.”

Born in Scotland, Simon moved to London aged seven and now lives in the Oxfordshire Cotswolds with his miniature schnauzer, Elodie. He fell in love with cycling one Saturday morning in 1994 while living in Italy when Milan-San Remo went past his front door. A daily cycle commuter in London back before riding to work started to boom, he's been news editor at road.cc since 2009. Handily for work, he speaks French and Italian. He doesn't get to ride his Colnago as often as he'd like, and freely admits he's much more adept at cooking than fettling with bikes.

5 comments

Avatar
Paul M [360 posts] 4 years ago
0 likes

The saying goes: "even a worm will turn".

Is this the beginning of the real fight-back? Are we seeing the birth of our own version, 40 years late, of "Stop der kindermoord"?

Avatar
Paul J [884 posts] 4 years ago
0 likes

@Paul M: tiny correction: "Stop de kindermoord".

["Der" dropped out of general use in the Netherlands somewhere around a century or so ago I think, but still retained in some things like names and titles - and even if it hadn't, still wouldn't have been grammatically correct in this phrase ;).]

Avatar
OldRidgeback [2620 posts] 4 years ago
0 likes

Err, so TfL has recognised that the King's Cross area presents a serious safety problem for vulnerable road users following a series of fatal accidents. And the response from TfL is to remove existing provision for vulnerable roader users?

Avatar
Coleman [335 posts] 4 years ago
0 likes

Review.

Ignore.

Acknowledge.

Review.

Ignore.

Any word on legal action against TfL? It is failing everyone except motorists.

Avatar
mad_scot_rider [581 posts] 4 years ago
0 likes
OldRidgeback wrote:

Err, so TfL has recognised that the King's Cross area presents a serious safety problem for vulnerable road users following a series of fatal accidents. And the response from TfL is to remove existing provision for vulnerable roader users?

Of course - if they avoid the place completely, how can they be in danger?