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Rider says he is highlighting the high levels of aggressive driving

The cyclist who filmed the Manchester road rage incident we featured yesterday has spoken about his on-going attempts to highlight poor driving standards using his helmet cam and the internet.

Neil Chatterjee, a 33-year-old university researcher told the Manchester Evening News that he has filmed numerous examples of bad driving in the short period since Christmas when he started using the £45 camera.

By uploading footage to the internet he says that motorists may be less inclined to “bully” cyclists.

Neil told the newspaper: "I just want road users to respect each other. I don’t think it should be war between motorists and cyclists. As far as I’m concerned there are good road users and bad road users.

“People should be thinking about the consequences of their actions. I cycle every day to and from work. People can get very aggressive behind the wheel of a car. They can try to bully you."

As for the incident in Longsight which as well as being picked up by road.cc, became one of the most viewed items on the BBC News website yesterday, he told the MEN

"That road narrows so you have to take the middle lane or someone will knock you off and you will end up in the railings. This chap tried to force his way past me but there wasn’t enough room for me, him and the cars coming in the other direction.

"He was so close to me I was able to bang on the side of his car and shout ‘oi’ at him. I thought he was going to knock me over. He didn’t back off and then drove in towards me. I was pinned against the railings. He grabbed hold of me and gave me a load of abuse. But he was in the wrong."

Neil Chatterjee follows in the tyre tracks of another Manchester helmet cam wearing cyclist - Jobysp, roadcc member (and latterly helmet cam reviewer), whose long running video catalogue of bad driving has been featured in the national media and which even earned him online threats from angry motorists after if featured in one particular national newspaper. 

Greater Manchester Police told road.cc that they have not yet received any information which will allow them to identify the car driver who threatened Mr Chatterjee. 
 

5 comments

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mad_scot_rider [581 posts] 5 years ago
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Quote:

I was able to bang on the side of his car and shout ‘oi’ at him.

Maybe not the best way to handle things?

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don_don [149 posts] 5 years ago
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Perhaps he should have tugged at his forelock and apologised for being in the poor driver's way???

 13

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OldRidgeback [2566 posts] 5 years ago
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Good thing too as the roads are cluttered by insecure and aggressive t**ts, a disproportionately large number of whom seem to favour BMW cars.

It is rather surprising, seeing how many people viewed the camera footage, that the man in the car hasn't yet been identified by police.

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handlebarcam [549 posts] 5 years ago
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If I were that cyclist, I wouldn't have agreed to have my photo taken, and published by the Manchester Evening News. Inevitably, as proved yet again by the comments posted on that web site, a great many people will side with their fellow driver, despite irrefutable video evidence that he is a maniac. They'd rather do that than entertain for one second that a member of that other tribe, the cyclists, could have been wronged by one of their own. And if they see this cyclist, with his camera on his helmet, they could take revenge. After all, he banged on the poor motorist's car, and what could be more insulting than having a lowly cyclist touching the shiny car you work so hard to buy, feed and care for?

Still, I cannot fault the cyclist for trying to make a stand. He (Neil Chatterjee) is quoted in the article as saying "As far as I'm concerned there are good road users and bad road users." Noble sentiments but, sadly, while logically you'd think filming bad driving would help break down the barriers, by allowing motorists see things through our eyes for a change, I think on balance it is having the opposite effect. It is seen as another in a series of "attacks" on motorists which, along with fuel price rises and speed cameras, are part of the "War on the Motorist" we keep hearing about. Of course, none of these things are half as bad as the stuff cyclists have to put up with on a daily basis (I'd list them, but I don't have time, and many of them are things it would be best not to tell motorists about, because some of them would start doing them on purpose.) But it is a well known sociological phenomenon that when a group believes itself to be under assault, or surveillance, from outside forces, it brings that group together. It helps form groups that didn't exist before. It's probably why many of us cyclists visit sites like this, to read and comment on the latest transgression against members of our group.

The same thing has happened throughout history, from Neanderthals versus "modern" humans, to most recently the 9/11 attacks. Al-Qaeda only murdered as many people as are killed on US roads by cars every couple of months. But in that context road deaths are internal, merely one of the costs of doing business, while terrorism is external. So it forever created the grouping in people's minds of "us", the western countries, against "them", the Islamist extremists (or for some people the whole of the Islamic world.) Another way to look at it would be "us", the ordinary people of the entire world, against "them", anyone who wants to tell other people what to do or think, which includes both terrorists and our own politicians - the global equivalent of "good road users" versus the "bad road users", if you will.

But each individual deciding for him or herself which politicians are ego-maniacs, which terrorists are freedom-fighters, and which road users are bad and which are good, is too much work for most people. Far easier to go along with what your leaders (currently David Cameron in the case of the UK, Jeremy Clarkson in the case of the petrol headed motorists) tell you to think (even if they change their minds as the West has with Gaddafi.) In other words, my tribe good, your tribe bad.

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LondonCalling [149 posts] 5 years ago
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handlebarcam wrote:

If I were that cyclist, I wouldn't have agreed to have my photo taken, and published by the Manchester Evening News. Inevitably, as proved yet again by the comments posted on that web site, a great many people will side with their fellow driver, despite irrefutable video evidence that he is a maniac. They'd rather do that than entertain for one second that a member of that other tribe, the cyclists, could have been wronged by one of their own. And if they see this cyclist, with his camera on his helmet, they could take revenge. After all, he banged on the poor motorist's car, and what could be more insulting than having a lowly cyclist touching the shiny car you work so hard to buy, feed and care for?

Agreed 100%. I have a major issue with the guy who appeared on the BBC Breakfast show with camera on helmet. Considering the cases where drivers do whatever they want and get away with it, even when they kill, some of the most crazy ones will think it's a lot of fun to "appear on You Tube"! I had 2 drivers pointing at my camera already, and not in a nice way.