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Proposals being studied, says Mayor - but is London's just too big?...

Mayor of London Boris Johnson has said that he is considering extending the Barclays Cycle Hire Scheme, introduced last July to central London and due to expand eastwards to Stratford next year, to boroughs in Outer London.

Both Boris Johnson and the critics of his approach to bringing about a "Cycling Revolution" in the capital agree that it is in London's outer borough where any growth in cycling needs to be nurtured. So it will be seen as doubly ironic by some that the Mayor is considering pointing his hire bikes at the suburbs to help achieve this growth in cycling as it was money cut from London Orbital cycle network project - a connected network of suburban cycle routes which that mayor used to help pay for his flagship hire bike scheme in central London.

Mr Johnson was speaking last Wednesday at London’s City Hall in response to a question from Green London Assembly Member Jenny Jones, who had accused him of “starving Outer London boroughs of cycling support, an accusation the Mayor described as “complete and utter tripe.”

Ms Jones highlighted a 2007 Transport for London TfL report which found that promoting cycling in Outer London was a way of increasing levels of cycling in the city generally, and suggested that it might cost £60 million to complete cycle schemes currently planned for those areas.

According to The Guardian, Mr Johnson flagged up Skyrides and Cycle-to-Work schemes as examples of initiatives that were helping to get more Londoners cycling, but Ms Jones challenged him to think on a larger scale, which is when he made his comments about potential expansion of the Barclays Cycle Hire Scheme.

“A cycle hire scheme in Outer London would be a wonderful thing to do,” he said, although he claimed there would be barriers to doing so. “The difficulty is you can't just have a new, self-contained cycle hire scheme a long way away from the current one without necessitating quite a big set of journeys by the Barclays guys moving the bikes around.

“It is logistically difficult, for instance, to set one up immediately in Croydon or anywhere else much as I would like to. But we are looking at it,” he added.

As has been previously pointed out, the larger (in terms of number of bikes and docking stations) Vélib’ scheme in Paris was expanded into that city’s suburbs during 2009, so there is no reason the same should not happen in London at some point.

However, it should be borne in mind that London and Paris are two cities on very different scales – the area now covered by Vélib’ would pretty much fit within the area encompassed by the North and South Circular Roads.

Put another way, Stratford, the easternmost point of the planed expansion, which is 10.9km from Trafalgar Square would in distance terms from the centre of the city be on the very periphery of Vélib’s current boundary, although it certainly can’t be considered Outer London.

That means that even if the London scheme were expanded to cover the same footprint as its Parisian counterpart, much of Outer London would still miss out, and the greater population and geographical area involved means that the cost of achieving a similar scale of coverage throughout London may prove a deterrent.

Ms Jones comments followed her quizzing Mr Johnson about how he planned to reach his goal of achieving a 5% share of all journeys in London by 2026, up from the present 2%.

She pointed out that while TfL projections said that an additional 180,000 journeys a day should come from the Cycle Hire Scheme and the Barclays Cycle Superhighways, that left a shortfall of 820,000 journeys to reach that target.

Referring to the two flagship schemes, Mr Johnson said: “By putting in these measures, these very visible encouragements, we are getting people who aren't interested in cycling or have been a little bit timid, to try it out.

“What we want is to create, in as much of London as possible, a village atmosphere - a village atmosphere where people feel they are going to be safe on these big, clunking blue [Barclays cyle hire] bikes or on their own bikes, to cycle through the city.”

As for how much progress is being made towards those goals, a TfL report published last month entitled Cycling Revolution London – End of Year Review 2010 provides an overview of cycling initiatives throughout the capital taking place on a number of fronts.

Published towards the end of London’s Year of Cycling – we’re now into the Year of Walking, and presumably 2012 will be the Year of Sitting Down to Watch the Olympics – the report not only looks at the Superhighways and Cycle Hire Scheme, but also at initiatives designed to improve cyclists’ safety or promote cycling in the school or workplace, as well as the Biking Boroughs programme.

The latter is designed to encourage cycling in Outer London boroughs, 13 of which have signed up to it, having each drawn up strategies with TfL for improving conditions for cyclists. Whether that will ever include local residents having access to the Barclays Cycle Hire Scheme remains, for now, unclear – certainly, it’s likely to be a good while before the likes of Hillingdon or Havering are included in any expansion.

Born in Scotland, Simon moved to London aged seven and now lives in the Oxfordshire Cotswolds with his miniature schnauzer, Elodie. He fell in love with cycling one Saturday morning in 1994 while living in Italy when Milan-San Remo went past his front door. A daily cycle commuter in London back before riding to work started to boom, he's been news editor at road.cc since 2009. Handily for work, he speaks French and Italian. He doesn't get to ride his Colnago as often as he'd like, and freely admits he's much more adept at cooking than fettling with bikes.

7 comments

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JC [155 posts] 5 years ago
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 37
Who cares about London?

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bassjunkieuk [32 posts] 5 years ago
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As I ride in from the Croydon area pretty much everyday on my own bike and having used the Boris bikes a few times when I've been in town I can hand-on-heart say I would NOT want to ride one of those bikes that distance!

For short hops around town they are ideal but the gearing and setup is not ideally suited for longer distance rides, especially when these are most likely going to be attempted by more experienced/stronger riders.

It would however be useful for for journeys around the local area as long as docking stations are suitably placed throughout the area.

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mad_scot_rider [581 posts] 5 years ago
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JC wrote:

 37
Who cares about London?

The fervent hope for the rest of us is that if the seat of government gets more 'bike-friendly', then the legislation, guidance etc. filtering down to us hicks in the sticks will benefit as a result.

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Simon_MacMichael [2443 posts] 5 years ago
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JC wrote:

 37
Who cares about London?

At a guess, the one in seven of the British population who live there (plus the tens of thousands more who commute in for work each day)  3

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bikecellar [268 posts] 5 years ago
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Simon_MacMichael wrote:
JC wrote:

 37
Who cares about London?

At a guess, the one in seven of the British population who live there (plus the tens of thousands more who commute in for work each day)  3

London, part of Britain, I think not.

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Michael5 [121 posts] 5 years ago
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bassjunkieuk wrote:

For short hops around town they are ideal but the gearing and setup is not ideally suited for longer distance rides, especially when these are most likely going to be attempted by more experienced/stronger riders.

As an occasional visitor to London I think they are great. I wouldn't want to ride one round Halifax/Bradford where I live though!

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Grizzerly [252 posts] 5 years ago
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Simon_MacMichael wrote:
JC wrote:

 37
Who cares about London?

At a guess, the one in seven of the British population who live there (plus the tens of thousands more who commute in for work each day)  3

So the vast majority of the population reaslly don't.