Careless cyclist deserved punishment

Oxford cyclist broke law but did the right thing by taking responsibility, says CTC

by Rebecca McIlhone   March 15, 2009  

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Much has been made of the story of Daniel Rosier, 25, who knocked over a schoolboy at a pedestrian crossing and was fined in court after admitting a charge of “careless cycling”.

Various stories claim the cyclist has complained the case should not have been taken to court but the CTC today told road.cc justice was done, while commending him for stopping to make sure the boy was OK.

According to a report in The Times, Rosier hit the boy at around 15 mph after cycling past stationary traffic at a red light in Oxford. As he came back to the kerbside he collided with the boy, said to be crossing the road.

The magistrates were told Rosier stopped immediately after knocking the boy over and took him to a nearby public house until his father arrived to collect him.

Kate Macnab, representing Rosier, said it was unusual for such a case to reach court, “partly because not many cyclists who are involved in scrapes and bangs with pedestrians stop to take responsibility”.

She added the traffic lights were flashing amber when the accident happened and that the boy was next to the crossing rather than on it. Rosier was granted a 12-month conditional discharge and ordered to pay £75 compensation to the boy and £60 costs.

Debra Rolfe, campaigns coordinator for the CTC told road.cc: “He broke the law, that’s what it comes down to. It’s commendable that he took the steps necessary to do the right thing and look after the boy. Lots of motorists leave cyclists bleeding on the roadside. Unfortunately he did break the law and this means justice has been served but he did the right thing by stopping to make sure the boy was ok.”

Meanwhile we’re still a little puzzled about The Sun’s version of the story, which says Rosier was prosecuted under “new laws to stop cyclists running red lights”. As far as we and the CTC know it has always been illegal for cyclists to run red lights, regardless of whether or not he did in this case.