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No emissions, no noise and a good way to avoid congestion

Sainsbury’s has begun trialling the UK’s first grocery delivery service by electric cargo bike. Five zero emission bikes are being run from the supermarket’s Streatham Common store, delivering up to 100 orders a day.

Sainsbury’s trialled cycle deliveries in 2016 for orders up to 20 items. However, the new trial is being run with e-cargobikes.com who are providing purpose-built bikes with the capacity to carry several customer orders at a time.

Clodagh Moriarty, Director of Online at Sainsbury’s, said: “We’re delighted to be the first supermarket to trial grocery deliveries by electric cargo bikes. We’re always looking for new ways to make sure we can best serve our customers and this trial will help us explore whether there might be a more flexible way to deliver Sainsbury’s groceries to those who live in busy cities.” 

As well as producing zero emissions and no noise pollution, the bikes will be able to make use of cycle lanes to avoid traffic and they’ll also be able to park closer to customers’ homes than is often possible for traditional delivery vans.

James FitzGerald, MD of e-cargobikes.com, commented: “We’re thrilled to be working with Sainsbury’s on this trial. By taking existing e-cargobike technology and putting it to the test in a new market, we’re reimagining grocery deliveries and exploring a more sustainable transport system.”

In 2015, researchers at the University of Brussels calculated that 68 per cent of all logistics trips could be carried out by bikes instead of motor vehicles. It is an avenue that is increasingly being explored by large firms.

Last year UPS began trialling a new urban delivery system (also in London). The firm said that by combining a bike with a power-assisted trailer, riders were able to transport up to 200kg of packages.

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