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Starting and finishing in Leeds on 6 May, three route options give 6,000 amateurs chance to ride same route as the pros

General entries are now open for the fourth annual Maserati Tour de Yorkshire Ride, which this year starts and finishes in Leeds and will take place on Sunday 6 May.

Setting off from the West Yorkshire city’s Woodhouse Moor, the finish line will be on The Headrow, the location where the Grand Départ of the Tour de France got under way in 2014.

It takes place on the final day of this year’s Tour de Yorkshire, now expanded to four stages, with the 6,000 participants in the sportive tackling some of the same climbs the pros will later in the day.

The routes have also been announced today, and will include some of the roads that featured on the opening stage of the 2014 Tour de France, with three distances available.

Those are ‘long’ (129km with 2,059m of climbing), ‘medium’ (84km/1,228m), and ‘short’ (49km/600m).  

Maserati Tour de Yorkshire Ride 2016 - Long route

Maserati Tour de Yorkshire Ride  2018 Long.JPG

Maserati Tour de Yorkshire Ride 2018 Long.JPG

Maserati Tour de Yorkshire Ride 2016 - Medium route

Maserati Tour de Yorkshire Ride 2018 Medium.JPG

Maserati Tour de Yorkshire Ride 2018 Medium.JPG

Maserati Tour de Yorkshire Ride 2016 - Short route

Maserati Tour de Yorkshire Ride  2018 Short.JPG

Maserati Tour de Yorkshire Ride 2018 Short.JPG

In partnership with Strava, there will be two segment challenges, at Greenhow Hill and Black Hill Lane, where King of the Mountain, Queen of the Mountain and Sprint Jerseys can be won.

The sportive is organised by Human Race, whose CEO, Nick Rusling said: “We say it every year, but the route this year is exceptionally tough – Yorkshire never fails.

“Cyclists will be tackling the same brutal climbs as the pros, and it’ll be made worthwhile when they cross the same finish line with the same roaring crowds. There’s no other UK sportive quite like it.”

Sir Gary Verity, chief executive of Welcome to Yorkshire, added: “What’s so fantastic about the event being in Leeds is that it makes it accessible for people to travel from across the UK and overseas to take part.

“The reason this event is so iconic is the pride and passion that the people of Yorkshire show whenever the eyes of the UK and the world are on our county.”  

Standard entry costs £45 for the Short course and £50 for both the Medium and Long courses.

Champion entry is also available, which includes extras such as the event jersey, medal engraving and a training plan devised by Team Sky's Luke Rowe, and costs £125 for the Short distance and £130 for the two longer distances.

Full details of the route and how to enter can be found here.

Born in Scotland, Simon moved to London aged seven and now lives in the Oxfordshire Cotswolds with his miniature schnauzer, Elodie. He fell in love with cycling one Saturday morning in 1994 while living in Italy when Milan-San Remo went past his front door. A daily cycle commuter in London back before riding to work started to boom, he's been news editor at road.cc since 2009. Handily for work, he speaks French and Italian. He doesn't get to ride his Colnago as often as he'd like, and freely admits he's much more adept at cooking than fettling with bikes.

13 comments

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CygnusX1 [740 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

@Simon - did you mean 2016? I don't have a time machine  4

Maserati Tour de Yorkshire Ride 2016 - Long route (etc)

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fustuarium [245 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

That is indeed 2018.

AS someone who lives on it as well, I can say 'Nice route'. Better than the 2016 route that was very urban. This will be really nice scenery for those who do it (medium and long. Short not so much).

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BehindTheBikesheds [1344 posts] 1 month ago
1 like

£50 to ride on public roads..lol
Paid for events that forcibly exclude riders are not for me and paying that amount of money so you can be 'roared on at the finish', what a load of balony!

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Htc [12 posts] 1 month ago
2 likes
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

£50 to ride on public roads..lol Paid for events that forcibly exclude riders are not for me and paying that amount of money so you can be 'roared on at the finish', what a load of balony!

I disagree, riding on closed roads is a wonderful experience. No junctions or traffic lights interrupting the flow of riding and no vehicles to think about makes it worth every penny to me. The number of people that do turn out to watch really add to the atmosphere and it’s nice to know that not everyone hates cyclists!

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CXR94Di2 [1961 posts] 1 month ago
1 like

Yorkshire folk cheer on cyclists. Remember TDF in Yorkshire. Bigger more cheering crowds than anything seen in Europe.  4

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fustuarium [245 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes
Htc wrote:

I disagree, riding on closed roads is a wonderful experience. No junctions or traffic lights interrupting the flow of riding and no vehicles to think about makes it worth every penny to me.

TdF was closed but TdY is a rolling roadblock. Although fitting 6000 riders on some of those lanes will in effect make it impassable to cars.

The best part of closed roads for me is the silence. It's eerie.

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mariekb1980 [6 posts] 1 month ago
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I can't see anything  anywhere about a closed road, or even a rolling road block, just says the same roads

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BehindTheBikesheds [1344 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes
Htc wrote:
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

£50 to ride on public roads..lol Paid for events that forcibly exclude riders are not for me and paying that amount of money so you can be 'roared on at the finish', what a load of balony!

I disagree, riding on closed roads is a wonderful experience. No junctions or traffic lights interrupting the flow of riding and no vehicles to think about makes it worth every penny to me. The number of people that do turn out to watch really add to the atmosphere and it’s nice to know that not everyone hates cyclists!

So unwarranted exclusion of some people wanting to ride is okay though, there's not a single UK sportive that I know of that is fully inclusive.

6000 people on bikes many of them strava wankers does not equate to a "wonderful experience" for many, too many state that sportives were horrible, univiting and dangerous.

You can ride on a road perfectly safely on a Sunday morning almost anywhere either on your own or with a friend or three, not only without spending a wad of cash but also without the forced restrictions that exclude riders or indeed having the 'wanka' element that always turn up at these events.

No thanks.

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Rapha Nadal [747 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

£50 to ride on public roads..lol Paid for events that forcibly exclude riders are not for me and paying that amount of money so you can be 'roared on at the finish', what a load of balony!

`

If the roads are completely closed then it's worh £50 just for that.  Nothing beats it.

Avatar
Htc [12 posts] 1 month ago
1 like
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:
Htc wrote:
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

£50 to ride on public roads..lol Paid for events that forcibly exclude riders are not for me and paying that amount of money so you can be 'roared on at the finish', what a load of balony!

I disagree, riding on closed roads is a wonderful experience. No junctions or traffic lights interrupting the flow of riding and no vehicles to think about makes it worth every penny to me. The number of people that do turn out to watch really add to the atmosphere and it’s nice to know that not everyone hates cyclists!

So unwarranted exclusion of some people wanting to ride is okay though, there's not a single UK sportive that I know of that is fully inclusive.

6000 people on bikes many of them strava wankers does not equate to a "wonderful experience" for many, too many state that sportives were horrible, univiting and dangerous.

You can ride on a road perfectly safely on a Sunday morning almost anywhere either on your own or with a friend or three, not only without spending a wad of cash but also without the forced restrictions that exclude riders or indeed having the 'wanka' element that always turn up at these events.

No thanks.

 

I’m really not sure about your comment regard Strava wankers or the ‘wanka’ element as you so eloquently describe it. I know many inexperienced cyclists for whom sportives provide them the confidence to ride further and harder than they may have done before knowing that there are clearly marked loos, feed stations, water stops and mechanical assistance provided. Often having completed one or two they then have the confidence to go out on their own or join a club. Sportives have a place in cycling, perhaps not for yourself but for many riders they are enjoyable and often the comradarie can be the best part. 

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Yorkshire wallet [1710 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes
CXR94Di2 wrote:

Yorkshire folk cheer on cyclists. Remember TDF in Yorkshire. Bigger more cheering crowds than anything seen in Europe.  4

This is what I can never get my head round. Massive turnout, massive support.....and then 30 minutes later they all hate cyclists again. People from work make the effort to watch some of stages and then in the next breath they're moaning about what cyclists did and how they lost 15s on the way to work.

Odd really.

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CXR94Di2 [1961 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

Ive paid up for myself and my two eldest to ride the TDY sportive.  A load of my cycling buddies from the forums are coming from all over the country to ride it too.  Should be a great day out-fish and chips for tea  4

Avatar
CXR94Di2 [1961 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes
Yorkshire wallet wrote:
CXR94Di2 wrote:

Yorkshire folk cheer on cyclists. Remember TDF in Yorkshire. Bigger more cheering crowds than anything seen in Europe.  4

This is what I can never get my head round. Massive turnout, massive support.....and then 30 minutes later they all hate cyclists again. People from work make the effort to watch some of stages and then in the next breath they're moaning about what cyclists did and how they lost 15s on the way to work.

Odd really.

 

Cage mentality, people change when inside a moving steel box, regrettably