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Clever coders could win IT equipment for their school

School children in Abergavenny are in the final of a DVLA competition with their invention - a cycle safety simulator.

Hywel Lewis, 10, Ella Gribbin, 10 and Sophia Elias, nine, of Our Lady and St Michael’s Primary School, created a game about cycle safety in response to a DVLA call to make a road safety game using Scratch, a coding language for learners.

The DVLA code challenge, in association with Code Club and the STEM Ambassador hub Wales, Incredible Oceans, Brake, The four Police Forces in Wales and School Beat, Road Safety Wales, The Fire and rescue Service and the British Army, asks young people to build a game that highlights how young people can spot hazards and stay safe while cycling.

First prize is £3000 of IT equipment for the school.

The group of talented pupils are one of just five groups to have made it through to the final of the competition, which will take place on Tuesday, November 28.

They have already earned their school £750 worth of IT equipment by making the final.

 

 

After an unpromising start, having to be bribed by her parents to learn to ride without stabilisers, Sarah became rather keener on cycling in her university years, and was eventually persuaded to upgrade to proper road cycling by the prospect of a shiny red Italian bike, which she promptly destroyed by trapping a pair of knickers in the rear derailleur. Sarah writes about about cycling every weekend on road.cc.

8 comments

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BehindTheBikesheds [1145 posts] 1 month ago
3 likes

How about DVLA get kids to do this for their parents driving motors first, yet again pushing the onus on the vuklnerable by snide, underhanded tactics. Even last week that was supposedly road safety week THINK had their usual victim blaming nonsense telling kids on foot to wear hi-vis etc.

and all the while still feck all done to curb the killers!no

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brooksby [2811 posts] 1 month ago
1 like
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

How about DVLA get kids to do this for their parents driving motors first, yet again pushing the onus on the vuklnerable by snide, underhanded tactics. Even last week that was supposedly road safety week THINK had their usual victim blaming nonsense telling kids on foot to wear hi-vis etc.

and all the while still feck all done to curb the killers!no

My office window overlooks a road that leads to a primary school. Every couple of days they take a class of kids out on foot for something. With staff and kids all wearing fluorescent yellow tabards with reflective strips, in the middle of the day (even when it was bright sunshine). As if someone would fail to notice a snake of thirty odd primary school kids ...

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TwisTed [9 posts] 1 month ago
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The high vis is for the teachers benefit, it's easier to spot when one of the little darlings is in the wrong place / doing the wrong thing. Also makes it less likely that someone gets left behind or traded in for a different model.

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brooksby [2811 posts] 1 month ago
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TwisTed wrote:

The high vis is for the teachers benefit, it's easier to spot when one of the little darlings is in the wrong place / doing the wrong thing. Also makes it less likely that someone gets left behind or traded in for a different model.

I hadn't thought of that; I guess that's the same reasoning behind when you see a school party trip and they're all wearing an identical fuschia backpack with the name of their school on the back...

(Or any club team in uniform...)

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oldstrath [928 posts] 1 month ago
3 likes
brooksby wrote:
TwisTed wrote:

The high vis is for the teachers benefit, it's easier to spot when one of the little darlings is in the wrong place / doing the wrong thing. Also makes it less likely that someone gets left behind or traded in for a different model.

I hadn't thought of that; I guess that's the same reasoning behind when you see a school party trip and they're all wearing an identical fuschia backpack with the name of their school on the back...

(Or any club team in uniform...)

It's fine until you get 3 or 4 school trips in the same place, all in the same bright yelliw tabards. Great fun to watch...

But given the frequency with which drivers round here hit trees, buildings, and 100 year old stone walls, yes, i think some of them might well not see 30 kids.

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BehindTheBikesheds [1145 posts] 1 month ago
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TwisTed wrote:

The high vis is for the teachers benefit, it's easier to spot when one of the little darlings is in the wrong place / doing the wrong thing. Also makes it less likely that someone gets left behind or traded in for a different model.

School uniform does exactly the same thing, the main point about it is to identify pupils by them wearing it.
As for kids getting lost, this wasn't an issue before so it's yet more bs and you fell for it hook line and sinker

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wycombewheeler [1246 posts] 1 month ago
1 like
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:
TwisTed wrote:

The high vis is for the teachers benefit, it's easier to spot when one of the little darlings is in the wrong place / doing the wrong thing. Also makes it less likely that someone gets left behind or traded in for a different model.

School uniform does exactly the same thing, the main point about it is to identify pupils by them wearing it.
As for kids getting lost, this wasn't an issue before so it's yet more bs and you fell for it hook line and sinker

So the school trips I saw at Alton towers when i was last there were all in high vis for the benefit of drivers? I side the theme park?
I even remember when my children wete younger them all being kitted out in bright red t shirts to be easier to identify at the beach. Also not all schools have uniform.

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don simon [1715 posts] 1 month ago
3 likes
TwisTed wrote:

The high vis is for the teachers benefit, it's easier to spot when one of the little darlings is in the wrong place / doing the wrong thing. Also makes it less likely that someone gets left behind or traded in for a different model.

They could use the less obtrusive, yet equally effective, number plate system.

Jus' sayin'.