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Three-time world champion is appealing being thrown out of July's race after Mark Cavendish crash...

Peter Sagan and the management company of his Bora Hanshgrohe team will face the UCI at the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) on 5 December as they seek to have the triple world champion’s disqualification from this year’s Tour de France overturned.

Sagan had already clinched one stage and was aiming to win a record equalling sixth successive green jersey when, at the end of Stage 4 in Vittel, he was involved in a crash with Dimension Data’s Mark Cavendish, who sustained a broken shoulder blade.

> Mark Cavendish out of Tour de France, Peter Sagan disqualified

Following the stage, the race jury imposed a 30-second time penalty on Sagan, who was also relegated to last place in the group he was in, costing him potential points in the green jersey competition.

But a couple of hours later, commissaires confirmed that they had thrown the Slovak rider out of the race after studying the footage again and concluding that “he [had] endangered multiple riders.”

The following day, Sagan told the press before the stage start that while he did not agree with the commissaires decision, he would accept it.

> Videos: Peter Sagan says he accepts Tour de France disqualification - but disagrees with it

Bora-Hansgrohe had been hopeful that an urgent appeal to the CAS might result in him being allowed to start that stage, but the decision did not come through until the following day and was in the UCI’s favour, so Sagan remained disqualified.

> Court of Arbitration for Sport rejects appeal against Peter Sagan's Tour de France disqualification

Six months on, any victory at the CAS on Sagan’s might be a Pyrrhic one but could have implications for how the race jury reviews similar incidents immediately after a stage in the future.

The forthcoming appeal will revolve around whether the correct procedures were followed in ejecting him from the race and in particular whether Sagan was denied the opportunity to provide his own version of events to the jury before it made its decision.

Born in Scotland, Simon moved to London aged seven and now lives in the Oxfordshire Cotswolds with his miniature schnauzer, Elodie. He fell in love with cycling one Saturday morning in 1994 while living in Italy when Milan-San Remo went past his front door. A daily cycle commuter in London back before riding to work started to boom, he's been news editor at road.cc since 2009. Handily for work, he speaks French and Italian. He doesn't get to ride his Colnago as often as he'd like, and freely admits he's much more adept at cooking than fettling with bikes.

9 comments

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kil0ran [562 posts] 1 week ago
4 likes

How very odd that Demare's identical move on Bouhanni in the same sprint wasn't punished. OK so Nacer has plenty of previous but I'm sure it was nothing to do with Arnaud wearing the French champion's jersey.

 

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handlebarcam [1054 posts] 1 week ago
2 likes

The good news is that the 2018 Tour is already scheduled to start a week later (due to some kick-ball thing happening around the same time.) So they could go back to Vittel and re-run the last 17 stages of the 2017 route, or maybe just the sprint stages, if the court rules in Mr. Sagan's favour.

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BehindTheBikesheds [870 posts] 1 week ago
4 likes

Just silly, he was clearly at fault, had absolutely no reason to go that far over and if as stated he was following the wheel of the guy in front was miles off both in distance behind and line. As the supposed best bike handler in the pro ranks his line and reaction to not moving back to the left to follow the rider he said he was drafting  simply doesn't add up.

sorry but that's how it is, you stuffed up and caused another rider to crash and crash badly, points on your license and DQ is just.

That Demare didn't get hefted off is no reason to change Sagan's DQ.

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alansmurphy [1059 posts] 1 week ago
1 like

BTBS - I'd suggest there's enough doubt to say a DQ was more than harsh and evidence of others doing the same with zero punishment is a fair defence. Not many pro's or people in the game agreed with the decision...

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SingleSpeed [373 posts] 1 week ago
4 likes
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

Just silly, he was clearly at fault, had absolutely no reason to go that far over and if as stated he was following the wheel of the guy in front was miles off both in distance behind and line.

 

That's just plain BS if you watch the other angles you see it's clear that Cavendish is up to his usual tricks and comes out worse, Sagan is in front moves, Cavendish  tries a headbutt, but puts him motion of falling down, Sagan is off balance and moves the elbow. Cavendish is already half way to the floor by the time Sagan's elbow comes out.

View the front angle shots.

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Rapha Nadal [639 posts] 1 week ago
3 likes
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

Just silly, he was clearly at fault, had absolutely no reason to go that far over and if as stated he was following the wheel of the guy in front was miles off both in distance behind and line. As the supposed best bike handler in the pro ranks his line and reaction to not moving back to the left to follow the rider he said he was drafting  simply doesn't add up.

sorry but that's how it is, you stuffed up and caused another rider to crash and crash badly, points on your license and DQ is just.

That Demare didn't get hefted off is no reason to change Sagan's DQ.

LOL

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alansmurphy [1059 posts] 1 week ago
1 like

You're confusing your opinion with fact again...

I actually think it was a bit of both. Sagan followed the line but was intending to overtake hence went further. He probably knew there was a rider trying to come round and wanted to shut the door. Happens in most sprints. Cav did what Cav does, took a risk and leaned across. The height and strength difference doesn't help and the fact that Cav is already off balance.

Maybe a telling off and time penalty at most but we all know they wanted him off the race...

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BehindTheBikesheds [870 posts] 1 week ago
0 likes
SingleSpeed wrote:
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

Just silly, he was clearly at fault, had absolutely no reason to go that far over and if as stated he was following the wheel of the guy in front was miles off both in distance behind and line.

 

That's just plain BS if you watch the other angles you see it's clear that Cavendish is up to his usual tricks and comes out worse, Sagan is in front moves, Cavendish  tries a headbutt, but puts him motion of falling down, Sagan is off balance and moves the elbow. Cavendish is already half way to the floor by the time Sagan's elbow comes out.

View the front angle shots.

I've seen all the views, Sagan is at fault for the crash, end of story, he has absolutely no need to go that far across, he states he was following the line of the guy in front, now either that is total bollocks or in this particular instance he's just crap at following the line the of the guy in front, which is it?

If you are following that line then why the feck is he going to the right so much and not changing his line back to the left to catch the draught of the rider in front as he said he was?

Either he makes a massive, massive mistake and not see/sense Cav coming up on the outside on a legitmate line at a speed much faster than he and still doesn't change his line OR he deliberately blocks Cav because he's miles off the pace and going backwards at a rate of knots and can see Cav coming up fast and thinks I'll make sure i don't lose another placing.

whichever it is he has absolutely no need whatsoever to be where he is, in fact by being there he is scuppering his own chances by coming off the line of the guy in front and losing the draught9hence why he's going backwards compared to everyone else).

Whichever way you look at it he's at fault.

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BehindTheBikesheds [870 posts] 1 week ago
0 likes
alansmurphy wrote:

You're confusing your opinion with fact again... I actually think it was a bit of both. Sagan followed the line but was intending to overtake hence went further. He probably knew there was a rider trying to come round and wanted to shut the door. Happens in most sprints. Cav did what Cav does, took a risk and leaned across. The height and strength difference doesn't help and the fact that Cav is already off balance. Maybe a telling off and time penalty at most but we all know they wanted him off the race...

Is that aimed at me?

Fact is that my opinion tallies up with the race judiciary and many others, either he is miles off his line and his words about following the line of the guy in front is BS thus he's made a massive error or he's moved deliberately across, whichever it is he is totally in the wrong position to have any chance to make forward progress and is going backwards at a rate of knots and if you are being generous causes a massive crash due to his piss poor positioning/lack of awareness.