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Adventurer Dhruv Boruah aims to rid the river of plastic waste

A cyclist is pedalling the length of the river Thames in a bid to rid the waterway of litter.

With just a bicycle, two bamboo sticks and a pair of floats, Dhruv Boruah has made his way through Oxfordshire, picking up litter and plastic waste on his 150 mile journey.

 

Speaking to the Oxford Mail, he said: “I always wanted to do more adventures and push myself out of my comfort zone.

“Recently I have been learning a lot more about plastic pollution and thought, as a normal citizen, why not try to help?”

 

Dhruv began his efforts in Lechlade on Monday, and reached Oxford on Wednesday.

He added: “I have two racks on the back which I have filled up each day. I wouldn’t say Oxford has been any worse than other areas, but before I got to Osney Lock it was quite nice, then I could tell I had got to an urban area as I started seeing the cans, takeaway packets and beer bottles.”

 

After an unpromising start, having to be bribed by her parents to learn to ride without stabilisers, Sarah became rather keener on cycling in her university years, and was eventually persuaded to upgrade to proper road cycling by the prospect of a shiny red Italian bike, which she promptly destroyed by trapping a pair of knickers in the rear derailleur. Sarah writes about about cycling every weekend on road.cc.

5 comments

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embattle [84 posts] 3 weeks ago
2 likes

It is tragic really since the towpaths are such l;ovely places to cycle, all due to people just being too lazy to use bins.

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Twowheelsaregreat [86 posts] 3 weeks ago
2 likes

I'm going to make an assumption that this guy isn't English just by his name but I think what he's doing is inspirational, incredibly commendable  because of the lack of care and pride the English seem to have in their own surroundings these days. There is litter everywhere and it is taking someone else to not only highlight the issue but actually do the dirty work himself. This is becoming a cultural issue which the government isn't doing enough to prevent. The Japanese can do it so why can't we. Maybe it's education?

The Japanese tend to burn their waste for energy and they do generate a lot of it but the public know where to put it. Likewise Singapore.

I think we not only need to educate people better but begin to enforce less use of plastic packaging. Fast food doesn't help as I see coffee cups and macdonalds packaging at the roadsides. The biggest issue is plastic fizzy pop bottles. Not only are the contents generally detrimental to the health but they are in plastic bottles. Additionally, it's amazing how little smokers consider their butts to be considered waste as they are flung into the nearest drain. Chewing gum contains plastic and yet this is so willingly disposed of straight on the pavement.

Fines aren't enough of a deterrent it seems. We could have a lot of street cleaners if this type of work was used as a form of punishment.

Avatar
Simon E [3095 posts] 3 weeks ago
1 like
Twowheelsaregreat wrote:

I think we not only need to educate people better but begin to enforce less use of plastic packaging. Fast food doesn't help as I see coffee cups and macdonalds packaging at the roadsides. The biggest issue is plastic fizzy pop bottles. Not only are the contents generally detrimental to the health but they are in plastic bottles.

I see more plastic bottles and energy drink cans than anything else on the roadside. IMO there should be a deposit on cans too. McD & KFC junk food containers are all too common. It's symbolic of the lack of respect a significant number of people have for their surroundings and the people who live there.

The huge quantity of plastic waste, a lot of it in the oceans, has prompted groups to campaign for a deposit on plastic drink bottles, including https://www.sas.org.uk/messageinabottle/

The food & drink industry isn't keen on a deposit system. But they don't give a toss about litter or the environment and would rather keep their corporate heads in the sand. Having said that, Coca-Cola did a swift u-turn after this Ecologist article appeared in February so there is still hope.

Perhaps the example of individuals like Dhruv Boruah getting out there and making a difference will prompt others to do something.

Avatar
ConcordeCX [431 posts] 3 weeks ago
1 like
Simon E wrote:
Twowheelsaregreat wrote:

I think we not only need to educate people better but begin to enforce less use of plastic packaging. Fast food doesn't help as I see coffee cups and macdonalds packaging at the roadsides. The biggest issue is plastic fizzy pop bottles. Not only are the contents generally detrimental to the health but they are in plastic bottles.

I see more plastic bottles and energy drink cans than anything else on the roadside. IMO there should be a deposit on cans too. McD & KFC junk food containers are all too common. It's symbolic of the lack of respect a significant number of people have for their surroundings and the people who live there.

The huge quantity of plastic waste, a lot of it in the oceans, has prompted groups to campaign for a deposit on plastic drink bottles, including https://www.sas.org.uk/messageinabottle/

The food & drink industry isn't keen on a deposit system. But they don't give a toss about litter or the environment and would rather keep their corporate heads in the sand. Having said that, Coca-Cola did a swift u-turn after this Ecologist article appeared in February so there is still hope.

Perhaps the example of individuals like Dhruv Boruah getting out there and making a difference will prompt others to do something.

Coca-Cola playing the CC-PP game. What a surprise.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/CC–PP_game

 

 

Avatar
Simon E [3095 posts] 3 weeks ago
0 likes
ConcordeCX wrote:

Coca-Cola playing the CC-PP game. What a surprise.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/CC–PP_game

Interesting, thanks.

road.cc broke your link so anyone wanting to read it try clicking this link instead.