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Eric Fishbein was killed in a collision while riding through Kansas

A 61-year-old rider competing in the coast-to-coast Trans Am Bike Race in the United States has been killed in a road traffic collision in Kansas, around halfway through the 4,300-kilometre route.

In a statement published on their Facebook page, the event organisers said: "We've just spoken to the Kansas Highway Patrol and confirmed rider Eric Fishbein was struck and killed last night on highway 96 in West Kansas.

"We are terribly saddened and our thoughts are with his family during this time. We are all reeling from this and are doing our best to get through today.

"To all racers, please know we're all pedaling together wherever we're sitting. Let your loved ones know where you are and what you plan to do.

"Some will keep pedaling, some will go home. We urge all to take the time to find the quickest path to healing.

"At this time we are discussing next steps to move forward. We ask for patience and understanding as we all try to get through this."

Fishbein's death comes less than three months after that of a past winner of the Trans Am Bike Race, British ultracyclist Mike Hall.

Hall, who also organised the Transcontinental Race across Europe, was killed when he was struck by a car during the Indian Pacific Wheel Race in Australia in March.

The Trrans AM Bike Race is currently being led by Evan Deutsch from Portland, Oregon who has around 400 kilometres left to ride to the finish in Newport News, Virginia.

Born in Scotland, Simon moved to London aged seven and now lives in the Oxfordshire Cotswolds with his miniature schnauzer, Elodie. He fell in love with cycling one Saturday morning in 1994 while living in Italy when Milan-San Remo went past his front door. A daily cycle commuter in London back before riding to work started to boom, he's been news editor at road.cc since 2009. Handily for work, he speaks French and Italian. He doesn't get to ride his Colnago as often as he'd like, and freely admits he's much more adept at cooking than fettling with bikes.