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Beautiful Machines, 100 Years of the Racing Bike exhibition until 29 July

A new exhibition at the Rapha Cycle Club in London traces cycle racing back through the last century with 12 road bikes ranging from early 20th Century fixed-wheel racers to the latest carbon superbikes.

There is a racing bike for every decade of the last 100 years, allowing the enthusiast to see how bike technology has developed over the years.

Highlights include a BSA Path Racer from 1901, the original Cannondale CAAD3 ridden by Mario Cipollini when he crashed out of Stage 1 of the 1998 Tour, and Lance Armstrong’s Trek which he rode in the mountain stages of the 2005 Tour de France.

The exhibition runs until next Thursday - 29 July - at the Rapha Cycle Club, London at 146-148 Clerkenwell Road EC1. Entry is free and the Club is open from 8am to 8pm Monday to Friday, 10am to 8 pm on Saturday and 10am to 4pm on Sunday.

The bikes on show are:

  • 1901 BSA Path Racer
  • 1912 CENTAUR Lightweight Road Racer
  • 1928 FONTAN Tour De France
  • 1938 POZZI
  • 1947 CIMATTA
  • 1951 BIANCHI Paris-Roubaix
  • 1969 PEUGEOT Record du Monde
  • 1977 GIOS TORINO GT Super Record
  • 1989 RALEIGH Systeme U
  • 1998 CANNONDALE CAAD3
  • 2005 TREK OCLV 5.9 US Postal
  • 2010 FELT Garmin Transitions F1 SL Team Bike

Lifelong lover of most things cycling-related, from Moulton Mini adventures in the 70s to London bike messengering in the 80s, commuting in the 90s, mountain biking in the noughties and road cycling throughout. Editor of Simpson Magazine (www.simpsonmagazine.cc). 

4 comments

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demoff [327 posts] 6 years ago
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Have you got any more pictures guys? None on Raphas site either.

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Martin Thomas [383 posts] 6 years ago
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sorry demoff - I meant to add some more photos earlier today but didn't get to it. Will try again tomorrow...

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Martin Thomas [383 posts] 6 years ago
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A few more pix added

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pathracer [1 post] 6 years ago
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Based on the chainwheel the BSA pathracer cannot be older than 1907...................1901 is definitely to early