Home
iPod up for grabs this week in initiative designed to get people on their bikes at Friday lunchtimes

This Friday will see cyclists in Oxford take to their bikes in hunt of hidden goodies including an Apple iPod as part of a bicycle-based treasure hunt called Find Me Friday.

Devised by Oxford Cycle Workshop, the game is designed to motivate people to get out and about on their bikes at lunchtime and has been devised by Oxford Cycle Workshop, who trialled it during the recent Oxford Cycle Challenge which attracted 1,000 participants, in partnership with keen cyclist Stuart Millar from the company ByBox, which makes the metal lockers that conceal the ‘treasure.’

The format of the game is simple – at 12.30 on Friday lunchtime, a tweet will be sent from the Challenge Oxford Twitter feed that will give the location of a tombola of locker door codes. Cyclists need to find the tombola and pick a code, then pedal across to the electronic locker where they find out which one their code opens and what is hidden inside – everyone’s a winner, even if it’s just a humble (but useful) puncture repair kit they walk away with, for example, rather than an iPod.

This Friday’s event is the third to be held in an aim to get cyclists out of their workplaces at lunchtime ahead of the weekend, and the first attracted no fewer than 40 particpants.

Entry is open to everyone – all you need is a bike and the ability to look out for that tweet at 12.30, oh and obviously you’ll need to be in Oxford too. Happy hunting!

Born in Scotland, Simon moved to London aged seven and now lives in the Oxfordshire Cotswolds with his miniature schnauzer, Elodie. He fell in love with cycling one Saturday morning in 1994 while living in Italy when Milan-San Remo went past his front door. A daily cycle commuter in London back before riding to work started to boom, he's been news editor at road.cc since 2009. Handily for work, he speaks French and Italian. He doesn't get to ride his Colnago as often as he'd like, and freely admits he's much more adept at cooking than fettling with bikes.