UCI to scan for "mechanical doping" motors during Tour de France after Chris Boardman visit

British legend shows sports officials how motors can be concealed within frames

by Simon_MacMichael   June 20, 2010  

Chris Boardman (copyright Simon MacMichael).jpg

Cycling’s governing body, the UCI, will be using scanners to check riders’ bike frames for motors ahead of this years 94th edition of the Tour de France, which gets under way in Rotterdam in two weeks’ time, with British track and road legend Chris Boardman having reportedly demonstrated to officials just how such a device could work in practice.

The UCI’s announcement follows recent claims that cyclists including World and Olympic Time Trial Champion Fabian Cancellara, winner of the Tour of Flanders and Paris-Roubaix in April, were employing “mechanical doping” to gain an edge over their rivals, accusations that the Swiss cyclist and his Team Saxo Bank firmly deny.

Recently, Boardman, who throughout a racing career that brought him World and Olympic titles, the Hour record and stints in the Tour de France yellow jersey, became noted for his interest in the design process and rigorous attention to detail, met with the UCI to outline how it was possible to incorporate motors within bicycle frames, according to the BBC.

The UCI reached its decision at a meeting of its Management Committee in Birmingham which took place last Thursday and Friday. In a press release on its website, it said: “The members of the Management Committee discussed issues concerning equipment used in road competitions and decided that it was necessary to bolster measures that have already been put in place (in particular the visual inspection of bicycles, a procedure that was recently reinforced).

“As a result, a scanner will be used from the time of the Tour de France. This instrument, recently tested with a successful outcome, will allow an official to detect any illegal devices that may be concealed, for example, in the bicycle frame.”

The UCI added that it was planning to collaborate with the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne “to examine ways to control, in an optimal manner, the influence of technology over the equipment used in cycling, such that this could offer a beneficial contribution to the sport and avoid any future deviations.”

It also said that “from now on race service will be subject to stricter regulation in order to ensure that only equipment that has been checked at the start or finish can be used during competitions.”

 

4 user comments

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Well done UCI for announcing this before the TdF and of course you wont catch anybody now that you have given them advance notice and you can pat yourselves on the back saying it was all innuendo and rumour as per your original announcement and this only confirms what you always said, instead of catching them then announcing the caught cheats.....

whose side are the UCI on, cheats or what????????

posted by Decster [245 posts]
20th June 2010 - 21:45

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@decster

I know why you are deeply sinicle but if this nips the problem in the bud then fair play to the UCI. The outcome will be the same anyway without the pain of the media outcry over the new doping and negative publicity.

posted by miffed [160 posts]
21st June 2010 - 0:10

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miffed wrote:
@decster

I know why you are deeply sinicle but if this nips the problem in the bud then fair play to the UCI. The outcome will be the same anyway without the pain of the media outcry over the new doping and negative publicity.

i'd rather catch the cheats and then they get banned. this way they have not been caught are unlikely to be caught. the story of motorised bikes is hardly good press for the sport.

nipping the problem in the bud tends to help when you catch the perpetrators and kick them out of the sport rather then letting get on with others ways to cheat.

I am extremely cynical about how the UCI runs pro cycling. If no one gets caught they'll not use the machines again, saying it was a storm in a cup. next race bikes are back in use.....cheats win again.

the sport should be more concerned with cleaning it up rather than spinning a dirty sport.

posted by Decster [245 posts]
21st June 2010 - 8:10

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miffed wrote:
I'd rather catch the cheats and then they get banned. this way they have not been caught are unlikely to be caught. the story of motorised bikes is hardly good press for the sport.

nipping the problem in the bud tends to help when you catch the perpetrators and kick them out of the sport rather then letting get on with others ways to cheat.

I am extremely cynical about how the UCI runs pro cycling. If no one gets caught they'll not use the machines again, saying it was a storm in a cup. next race bikes are back in use.....cheats win again.

the sport should be more concerned with cleaning it up rather than spinning a dirty sport.

+1

Sweeping things under the carpet won't make them go away, but that seems to be the way things get done in Lausanne.
Announcing the testers are coming just gives the UCI an excuse to announce a media and fan-friendly 'clean sheet'.
Right now, the sports' image is in the toilet and the UCI's brief is to manufacture a 'clean' image, by whatever ways and means open to them.
If this involves cover-ups, lies and denials, then so be it; it won't be the first time it's happened, either inside or outside cycling.
It's a business, after all.

neilwheel's picture

posted by neilwheel [130 posts]
21st June 2010 - 11:08

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