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Male rider dies after collision involving HGV on Homerton High Street this afternoon

A male cyclist has died in London this afternon following a collision with a tipper truck. The incident took place at around 4.20pm in Homerton High Street.

A Metropolitan Police spokesman confirmed to road.cc that officers had attended the incident alongside members of the London Ambulance Service, with the victim pronounced dead at the scene.

The driver of the lorry stopped at the scene and is assisting officers with their investigation.

Twitter user @namelesswon posted a picture of the scene to the social network; the other death mentioned in the tweet was related to a stabbing incident and did not involve a cyclist.

 

 

Lorries of any description make up just 4 per cent of London's traffic, but account for around half of cyclist deaths in the city.

Among those fatalities, tipper trucks are by far the most common type of lorry involved; the same type of vehicle was involved in the death last month of physiotherapist Stephanie Turner.

The 29-year-old was killed at the junction of Amhurst Road and Seven Sisters Road, just a couple of miles from the scene of today's fatality.

Hundreds of cyclists attended a vigil in her memory last week.

 

Born in Scotland, Simon moved to London aged seven and now lives in the Oxfordshire Cotswolds with his miniature schnauzer, Elodie. He fell in love with cycling one Saturday morning in 1994 while living in Italy when Milan-San Remo went past his front door. A daily cycle commuter in London back before riding to work started to boom, he's been news editor at road.cc since 2009. Handily for work, he speaks French and Italian. He doesn't get to ride his Colnago as often as he'd like, and freely admits he's much more adept at cooking than fettling with bikes.

53 comments

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don simon [795 posts] 2 years ago
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RIP.

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sfichele [140 posts] 2 years ago
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Another sad day. RIP.

"Lorries of any description make up just 4 per cent of London's traffic, but account for around half of cyclist deaths in the city."

If that's true then lorries are killing 24 times more cyclists than any other motorised vehicle. There is something seriously, seriously wrong here...

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CXR94Di2 [1506 posts] 2 years ago
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When will this end, 4% that kills 50% of cyclists.?

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Evo Lucas [23 posts] 2 years ago
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RIP

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Joeinpoole [438 posts] 2 years ago
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Does anyone understand *why* tipper trucks specifically are responsible for so many cyclist deaths and injuries?

Is it due to the design of the cabs, a lack of visibility or the training of drivers? Are the drivers generally employed or are they self-employed for example?

There *has* to be a reason and we need to find it as quickly as possible. Maybe some academic can apply to TfL for a grant to research the issue and come up with solutions.

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jacknorell [969 posts] 2 years ago
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Tipper trucks are massively over-represented.

It's a problem with how that industry is structured. With pay per load contracts, sole operators, and razor thin margins all leading to aggressive driving of poorly maintained vehicles in what is usually busy areas as that's where construction is.

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bdsl [201 posts] 2 years ago
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Another big problem is that if someone is knocked off their bike by a tipper truck or other construction vehicle it's much too easy for them to fall under the wheels instead of being pushed away. They are often designed with a lot of open space around the wheels, which makes them easier to drive on the uneven ground of bulding sites but much more dangerous.

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Initialised [313 posts] 2 years ago
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How many more people have to die because our government will not make collision avoidance systems mandatory for large and dangerous on vehicles on our nation's roads?

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andreacasalotti [13 posts] 2 years ago
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If this happened in the rail, air or maritime industry, tipper trucks would be off the road until made safe.

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nuttyxander [9 posts] 2 years ago
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Joeinpoole wrote:

Does anyone understand *why* tipper trucks specifically are responsible for so many cyclist deaths and injuries?

Is it due to the design of the cabs, a lack of visibility or the training of drivers? Are the drivers generally employed or are they self-employed for example?

There *has* to be a reason and we need to find it as quickly as possible. Maybe some academic can apply to TfL for a grant to research the issue and come up with solutions.

TfL funded a study from TRL as part of the work as it developed towards their incoming changes to the London Lorry Control scheme.
http://www.tfl.gov.uk/cdn/static/cms/documents/safer-lorry-trl-report.pdf
Table 4-2 is particularly worth a look

Additionally there is a TfL funded piece of research into all London cycle fatalities from 2007-11
http://www.tfl.gov.uk/cdn/static/cms/documents/pedal-cyclist-fatalities-...

The question of how drivers are incentivised is I think the only real gap in the current studies available.

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antigee [377 posts] 2 years ago
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"The question of how drivers are incentivised is I think the only real gap in the current studies available."

also do major construction contractors put pressure on suppliers to meet delivery slots? Is performance on this issue used to reward contracts / deny contracts / lodge claims for delays on site

note the right turn lane in the picture that narrows the road lane,
traffic flow rules  2

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levermonkey [681 posts] 2 years ago
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antigee wrote:

note the right turn lane in the picture that narrows the road lane, traffic flow rules  2

Add to that the Pavlovian obeyance to white lines by drivers and you have a recipe for disaster.

http://road.cc/content/news/135156-roads-without-centre-lines-make-safer...

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OldRidgeback [2730 posts] 2 years ago
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antigee wrote:

"The question of how drivers are incentivised is I think the only real gap in the current studies available."

also do major construction contractors put pressure on suppliers to meet delivery slots? Is performance on this issue used to reward contracts / deny contracts / lodge claims for delays on site

note the right turn lane in the picture that narrows the road lane,
traffic flow rules  2

Yes indeed, construction firms do put pressure on suppliers to make deliveries on time. It costs money , a lot of money, if deliveries are late as this can hold up construction work.

There are many factors as to why tipper trucks are involved in so many fatalities involving cyclists and most have been mentioned in previous posts. One that hasn't so far is that a lot of the companies running tipper truck fleets operate under very questionable methods. Some of the tipper trucks are also poorly maintained. And there are a lot of owner-operators of tipper trucks who are under the most pressure of all. If they miss deadlines for deliveries, they can well lose their job and their truck.

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pants [237 posts] 2 years ago
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Something is very very wrong, it's always tipper trucks. Both sides should be more aware, even if it means as cyclists we avoid going anywhere near these things just to protect ourselves, the tipper trucks are clearly not equipped properly to spot cyclists.

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Ramz [61 posts] 2 years ago
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There is something to be said for the Swiss method of logistical planning: make sure there are plenty of contingencies and waits so that you will not be held up in case of an unforeseen delay. It means that multiple moving components of a complex system (like a railway, construction site, etc) can operate safely and like clockwork.

Unfortunately Japanese Kaizen methods are all the rage - to identify 'waste' and eliminate it. In simplistic terms when a lorry is not trundling along at its optimum speed this is a waste in Kaizen terms.

This all comes from applying methodologies uncritically in situations without looking at the broader context (in this case costs and 'wastes' outside the immediate and narrow construction model.

Oh, and the greed of the people at the top, and the love of our politicians for money.

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bikecellar [268 posts] 2 years ago
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I note that there is a camera on the left opposite the scene.

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mrmo [2090 posts] 2 years ago
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RIP,

I regularly have a number of tipper trucks pass me on the way to work, and i have never had an issue the drivers give me plenty of room. However this is in a rural setting plenty of time good sight lines etc. now take one of these trucks and place it into a urban setting, far more to see, far more going on, driver distracted by sat nav trying to find delivery address, cars and cyclists cutting in and out, then through in to the mix the trucks own issues with blind spots and you really do have a disaster waiting to happen.

In the right place these trucks are perfectly safe, an urban setting isn't the right place without major work.

I seem to remember that a large quantity of materials for the olympics were brought in on barges to keep trucks off the road. This won't work for everything but it is things like this that should be addressed on all developments.

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Joeinpoole [438 posts] 2 years ago
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OldRidgeback wrote:

Yes indeed, construction firms do put pressure on suppliers to make deliveries on time. It costs money , a lot of money, if deliveries are late as this can hold up construction work.

There are many factors as to why tipper trucks are involved in so many fatalities involving cyclists and most have been mentioned in previous posts. One that hasn't so far is that a lot of the companies running tipper truck fleets operate under very questionable methods. Some of the tipper trucks are also poorly maintained. And there are a lot of owner-operators of tipper trucks who are under the most pressure of all. If they miss deadlines for deliveries, they can well lose their job and their truck.

But there's a lot of other owner-operators of HGVs working for the construction industry and who don't keep killing cyclists. For example most concrete-mixing lorries (even though they may be decked out in the livery of a concrete manufacturer) are owned/operated by their drivers. Also the tipper-truck phenomena appears to be confined largely to London. Why? Is it just the sheer volume of construction traffic?

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Colin Peyresourde [1794 posts] 2 years ago
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I know this road and from the picture exactly where this is. It's quite a narrow stretch and there is some road furniture which puts the cyclists in direct conflict with the traffic.

Usually the traffic is slow just before Chatsworth Road, often cyclists coming up from the junction get the hop on the traffic because of queues. The tendency is for them to under cut the traffic. As the approach the traffic island the inside route is normally barred because the cars/buses/trucks take away the space. I would not recommend doing this, and that cyclists overtake the slow moving traffic here.

I have seen many less wary about doing so.

The road infrastructure will have a massive part to play in this.

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don simon [795 posts] 2 years ago
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Quote:

The road infrastructure will have a massive part to play in this.

Driver attitude will have a massive part to play in this.
I lived and drove, cycled and motorcycled in Madrid and not once had issue with drivers. That is except for one bus driver who was looking for trouble and deliberately drove at me while cycling.
As a driver you have to expect the motorbikes and scooters filter through to the front a traffic lights. Even if none filter through, you expect it and therefore look for it. There is a far heightened awareness of other road users. The only accidents I saw were where the scooterist had gambled and lost.
There are lots of cyclists in that there London village and the driver's default should be that there is a cyclist coming from behind.
We must learn to share the roads.

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Colin Peyresourde [1794 posts] 2 years ago
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You don't know that road. Cyclists regular come up on vehicles from the left and so drop into a massive blind spot. The driver will likely have been focusing on the car in front and the traffic in front of that. Undertaking is never recommended but this is how the road set-up dictates things. Strictly speaking the cyclist should take the lane and sit behind the truck - never undertake a tipper.

It's not surprising that a tipper truck was involved as they have huge off-side blind spots. The driver will not have known that the cyclist was there and may have done nothing wrong.

The filtering of cyclists happens well before any junction or traffic light.

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jacknorell [969 posts] 2 years ago
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Joeinpoole wrote:

Also the tipper-truck phenomena appears to be confined largely to London. Why? Is it just the sheer volume of construction traffic?

Yes, pretty much. There's been a boom in commercial construction for the last decade.

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don simon [795 posts] 2 years ago
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Quote:

You don't know that road.

What a ridiculously presumptuous thing to say.

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tarquin_foxglove [144 posts] 2 years ago
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Colin Peyresourde wrote:

You don't know ... The driver will likely have been focusing on the car in front and the traffic in front of that. ... The driver will not have known that the cyclist was there and may have done nothing wrong.

Please heed your own advice & keep your victim blaming opinions to yourself.

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sargey2003 [7 posts] 2 years ago
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The driver has a responsibility to be aware of the fact that a cyclist may be there. If he was not aware then he has done something wrong.

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congokid [303 posts] 2 years ago
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Joeinpoole wrote:

Does anyone understand *why* tipper trucks specifically are responsible for so many cyclist deaths and injuries?

Random checks on lorries in the capital under Operation Mermaid (2008) found that every single lorry that was stopped was in contravention of the law in some way.

During the more recent Operation Safeway, two thirds of the lorries on London's roads were breaking the law in some way - dodgy brakes, a fiddled tacho, unsafe load, etc. Fourteen were considered so dangerous they were immediately taken off the road.

It appears to be a profession in which law-breaking is endemic, and probably even condoned and encouraged by the FTA.

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Colin Peyresourde [1794 posts] 2 years ago
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tarquin_foxglove wrote:
Colin Peyresourde wrote:

You don't know ... The driver will likely have been focusing on the car in front and the traffic in front of that. ... The driver will not have known that the cyclist was there and may have done nothing wrong.

Please heed your own advice & keep your victim blaming opinions to yourself.

Well I have seen a lot of cyclists do this and it is dangerous to do so here. I'm explaining that it is about the road structure forcing cyclists into a behaviour they have learned. And explaining that the lorry driver may have been obeying the rules of the road too. People are pretty quick to jump on lorry driver (as evidenced above). You haven't told them to be quiet so I won't be anytime soon.

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Colin Peyresourde [1794 posts] 2 years ago
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sargey2003 wrote:

The driver has a responsibility to be aware of the fact that a cyclist may be there. If he was not aware then he has done something wrong.

I would agree with you if the lorry is turning and moving into space. But if it just moving forward then you cannot hope for it to be aware 100% of the time of what happens behind or beside it.

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teaboy [307 posts] 2 years ago
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Ah, Hackney - the "share the road - it's safer" borough. Thanks again...

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Colin Peyresourde [1794 posts] 2 years ago
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don simon wrote:
Quote:

You don't know that road.

What a ridiculously presumptuous thing to say.

Anymore ridiculous than talking about Madrid lorry drivers? Me' thinks not.

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